8 Replies Latest reply on May 2, 2013 1:05 PM by AttilaHan

    Camera calibration tab in ACR ...

    AttilaHan Level 1

      When we slide the saturation slider for a primary to the left end (completely desaturated position), does it mean that we move this primary to the white point on the chromaticity diagram? Thanks ...

        • 1. Re: Camera calibration tab in ACR ...
          Jeff Schewe Level 5

          No...adjusting the sliders alters the hue and saturation of the end points of the RGB primaries and has no real effect on the white point.

          • 2. Re: Camera calibration tab in ACR ...
            ssprengel Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            What you will find; however, or at least what I find, is that if you set the Red Sat = Green Sat = -100 and Blue Sat = -50, then no matter what WB Temp/Tint are set to or Camera Profile you select or whether the image is raw or jpg, with those three sliders set that way, the image won’t have any color, and if you set the Blue Sat to -100 you’ll actually see a hue reversal, although it’ll be very faint and you have to crank up the main Saturation slider to see much color.

            • 3. Re: Camera calibration tab in ACR ...
              AttilaHan Level 1

              Hi Jeff ... I don't mean any effect on the white point ... I mean that moving a primary to the place of white point in the chromaticity diagram ... I think that this can be done by dragging the saturation slider to the left end.

              • 4. Re: Camera calibration tab in ACR ...
                AttilaHan Level 1

                Hi ssprengel ... You may get the same result decreasing one saturation slider -100 and and others -75. Do you know why we always get monochorome image after decreasing saturation sliders -250 in total. I thought that we should get completely desaturated image by dragging all the saturation sliders to the left end, -300 in total ... but this is not the case with ACR.

                • 5. Re: Camera calibration tab in ACR ...
                  Jeff Schewe Level 5

                  AttilaHan wrote:

                   

                  I mean that moving a primary to the place of white point in the chromaticity diagram ... I think that this can be done by dragging the saturation slider to the left end.

                   

                  Moving the camera calibration saturation sliders to -100 does not completely desaturate the RGB colors. It only moves the saturation in a range useful for camera calibration–you would never need to completely desaturate a sensors colors for the purposes of calibration.

                  • 6. Re: Camera calibration tab in ACR ...
                    AttilaHan Level 1
                    Jeff Schewe wrote:
                    Moving the camera calibration saturation sliders to -100 does not completely desaturate the RGB colors. It only moves the saturation in a range useful for camera calibration–you would never need to completely desaturate a sensors colors for the purposes of calibration.
                    I see ... but as ssprengel said, if you desaturate three primaries -250 in total, input profiles on the camera calibration tab can be made monochrome. I think that the range of saturation sliders are going beyond which are required for just fine tuning camera profiles. Am I missing something?
                    • 7. Re: Camera calibration tab in ACR ...
                      Jeff Schewe Level 5

                      AttilaHan wrote:

                      I see ... but as ssprengel said, if you desaturate three primaries -250 in total, input profiles on the camera calibration tab can be made monochrome. I think that the range of saturation sliders are going beyond which are required for just fine tuning camera profiles. Am I missing something?

                       

                      I don't know...I think that's a question for an engineer (there may be one lurking around).

                      • 8. Re: Camera calibration tab in ACR ...
                        AttilaHan Level 1

                        Thank you for your time ...