5 Replies Latest reply on May 28, 2013 7:04 AM by SAFEHARBOR11

    Suddenly very slow export

    Script2Screen

      Hi.  Basically, my export has gone very slow.  I will give what details I can, but the main thing here is that I am doing what I have always done, but suddenly it is going very slow.  I export to MPEG2 DVD as that goes straight onto a DVD without further render in my Sony DVD maker program.  Export in Premiere usually takes between 30 and 40 minutes. Latyest project is warning me of over 3 hours!  I thought I would ask here before waiting and seeing if it still works okay in case there is an obvious answer.  MPEG audio, multiplexer on, maximum mrender depth, CBR slider set to make a file that will be as large to preserve quality and still fit on a DVD (I go for around 4GB or just over)  Stick to CBR as the estimated file size is more accurate than messing about with VBR sliders.  Projects are standard definition, two video sources mixed (full DV) and separate sound source added and synchronised.  I film stage plays with two cameras.  Projects typically between one and a half and two and a half hours long.  This project is actually at the lower end.  No other obvious problems with the PC in general.  Is it worth a system restore?  It was fine for a project similar size rendered last week.  I am asking befoire i try system restore as they are getting hard to do.  They never seem to work unless I remove all my virus protection stuff!  CAn I think of anything different about this project?  Well, only that the venue I was filming in was not quite level, resulting in a bit of an angle that I corrected by tilting the film just a few degrees.  (Only affecting the part of the picture that would be off the TV screen) just to make the stage look level.  I often do this with a few shots from one of the cameras, but maybe not the whole film for both cameras like in this case.  I even tried pressing enter and doing that render thingy before export.  That did not help.  Maybe that is just to get something better in the preview window.  Normally it just takes around half an hour or just over.  Media player can be a bit crackly and choppy playing the rendered movie, but then it is always fine on the DVD so I just put that down to windows media playing being a bit rubbish and not important in my case.  Sorry if I have neglected to tell you anything important.  I usually get told off for this on this forum, but I have tried to give you details about the settings I am using.  The main thing is that I am only doing what I usually do.  If I was exporting to a different format I might expect a different time.  I can tell you that I got bored waiting and cancelled a few times before coming on here.  A couple of times the screen went very white and said windows would close the problemn and notify me of any solution.  Program closed but no useful information (I would not really have expected Windows to give me any!).  Maybe someone here can?   I suppose I had better wait for the three hours or more and at least see what comes out, but cant help being scared it will freeze at 37.34 percent and I will give up after waiting three weeks!  But any suggestions would be helpful.  Sorry not very tech-savvy so please keep it to plain English.  Thanks in advance

        • 1. Re: Suddenly very slow export
          SAFEHARBOR11 Most Valuable Participant

          Without knowing your computer specs, hard to comment on how long an export ought to take. However, you said yourself that you may have applied rotation to much of the video, and perhaps that is slowing things down from normal.

           

          Please check that your hard drives are defragged and are not getting more than 70-80% full as performance can quickly degrade. I would turn OFF the "Max Bit Depth" and "Max Render Quality" if being used. Should not be needed for DV clips going to DVD. As for pre-rendering the timeline, not recommended. This just adds another layer of compression (quality loss) to the final render, IF you check "Use Previews" in the Export area. If not using Previews, then it is all getting re-rendered anyways, so just a waste of time and drive space really, unless playback is so terrible that you want to render a section to check the results before exporting.

           

          I notice you have MultiPlexing ON for the export - is that how the Sony DVD software wants it? Most authoring programs (like Encore) perform better with separate elements of audio and video, meaning the .wav and .m2v files. Reason being that the DVD program will usually be creating Dolby (AC3) audio for the final DVD, so if you feed it the raw elements, it can convert the .wav to .ac3 quickly, and will NOT need to transcode the video. If you Mux (combine) the audio and video, the audio has then been compressed to lossy MPEG audio, then the DVD software needs to separate the audio and video and re-encode them again in most cases. Not the best workflow. Unless your final DVD uses MPEG audio, but I'm not sure that is a legal part of the spec worldwide, is normally PCM or AC3 for player compatibility.

           

          Not a big fan of anti-virus programs, have found many of the popular ones to really take over and bog down the system. Personally, I use and recommend the free solution of Microsoft Security Essentials. My computer, and those of my kids, have been virus-free the last couple of years since going to that solution, and I see no decrrease in performance and it runs in the background totally transparent to me.

           

          Regards,

           

          Jeff Pulera

          Safe Harbor Computers

          • 2. Re: Suddenly very slow export
            Script2Screen Level 1

            Thank you Safeharbor11.  That is all helpful.  I think it was just the tilting thing really, as the next project has rendered iun the normal time I would expect.  That said, some of your stuff was really useful to know.  Use previews is switched off, but I will make sure in future.  As for the multiplexing, well that is really because Sony will put MPEG2DVD straight on without a further render.  If I kept it separate (I think) the DVD program would render again.  I used to export to full DV and let the authoring program render, but that seemed to lose some quality.  Specifically, the black backgrounds were not quite black!  More a flickery dark grey.  I use these a lot for scrolling credits, and I found that MPEG2 looked a lot better.  As for your query as to why I use MPEG sound.  Well, you are right that the authoring program still renders this (but just the audio not the video).  But using MPEG sound does allow me to slide the bitrate line quite a lot higher than using PCM and still fit the final thing on a DVD.  Swings and roundabouts I suppose.  No customers as yet have complained of a decline in audio quality.  If I am filming dancers, say, I like a smooth movement.  These 700mb avi films you can download that most people are fine with, always look a bit jerky to me, or blurry during fast action.  And I am visually impaired!  So I am a bit paranoid about getting these things right.  Your advice has been very helpful thanks

            • 3. Re: Suddenly very slow export
              SAFEHARBOR11 Most Valuable Participant

              Dolby AC3 is the standard for DVDs and is the same bitrate as MPEG audio. My understanding has always been that while *most* DVD players will play MPEG audio, the "official" DVD specification calls for either PCM or Dolby. So given a choice of Dolby or MPEG sound, Dolby would be my choice for both compatibility, and quality.

               

              Thanks

               

              Jeff

              • 4. Re: Suddenly very slow export
                Script2Screen Level 1

                Thanks again so much.  I have done a test (without a render, just looking at the estimated file size)  You are right that Dolby is the same, so I shall try this in the next project.  I stick by avoiding PCM.  That does take up more space and affect the bitrate I can use to keep all to fit on a DVD.  I am talking about the difference between 3 point something and 4 point something on the slider to keep it around 4 gig.  But dolby does give the same as MPEG.  As for you saying that MPEG might not work for a DVD, well no customers have complained yet.  However, maybe that is why the DVD program renders the audio.  Yes, I know I said that I liked the MPEGDVD to a avoid a second render with the authoring, but I just meant a long video render.  The authoring program does re-render audio but it only takes a minute or two for what are usually around two hour films.  So, maybe choosing Dolby will avoid this, and if it gives me a better quality sound track then even better.  So you have helped me a lot thanks.  By the way, before suggesting that I could improve things by having a crack at VBR, the problem here is that the estimated file size is much less reliable here.  Nothing worse than thinking it will be fine, only to find out that it is a whole Gig higher and will not fit on the disc!!!

                • 5. Re: Suddenly very slow export
                  SAFEHARBOR11 Most Valuable Participant

                  Don't trust the estimated size thing at the bottom of the AME window. Rather, use a bitrate calculator (search online) or use the formula 560/minutes=rate. For instance, 560/120=4.66 and I just round down a little for safety to allow for menu overhead and such, so will use 4.5 in this case. This should hold true whether using CBR or VBR encoding, as VBR will maintain the proper average bitrate. I used this last night for a 140 minute program and it just fit the DVD.

                   

                  Thanks

                   

                  Jeff Pulera

                  Safe Harbor Computers