9 Replies Latest reply on Mar 13, 2015 2:01 PM by HarleyTDavis

    Video Frame Capture

    LST

      Can you capture individual video frames for sharing or printing using Premiere Elements?

        • 1. Re: Video Frame Capture
          A.T. Romano Level 7

          LST

           

          Yes.

           

          But, what version of Premiere Elements are you using and on what computer operating system is it running.

           

          With those details, we can give you more specific details of the process. There is even a way to get all the frames of your video as freeze frames at one time as well as to get one frame of your video as a freeze frame. There are two places in the program that freeze frame, one will give you a .bmp freeze frame, another will give you the ..jpg freeze frame.

           

          We will watch for additional information from you if you want specifics.

           

          Thanks.

           

          ATR

          • 2. Re: Video Frame Capture
            LST Level 1

            Thank you for your reply.  Premiere Elements 11 is running on Windows 7 OS. 

            • 3. Re: Video Frame Capture
              A.T. Romano Level 7

              LST

               

              One at a time freeze frame grab....ending up with .bmp image on Timeline, in Project Assets, and a copy in Documents Adobe Folder/Premiere Elements/11 (default)

               

              Timeline Indicator at position of frame to be grabbed

              Tools Menu/Freeze Frame or Toots Tab/Freeze Frame at bottom of interface

              Freeze Frame dialog/Insert in Movie

               

              There are other options in the Freeze Frame dialog for you to explore, such as Export and Edit with Photoshop Elements after inserting.

               

              Also, you can get a jpeg freeze frame if, after placing the Timeline Indicator at the spot for the frame grab, you go to Publish+Share/Computer/Image. There you can use the default settings for your choice or customize under the Advanced Button of the preset.

               

              Another interesting aspect of the Publish+Share/Computer/Image route is that you can get a freeze frame for all the frames of your video (all at one time) by putting a check mark next to the option Export as Sequence in the Export Settings dialog under the Advanced Button of the preset used. Lots to explore.

               

              Please review and then let us know if you have any further questions on this.

               

              Thanks.

               

              ATR

              • 4. Re: Video Frame Capture
                the_wine_snob Level 9

                ATR has given you excellent, detailed directions for the two methods of doing Freeze Frame Still Images.

                 

                One caveat would be that when printing, I would go the BMP route, rather than JPEG, to keep what quality you have, uncompressed - BMP will be a larger file, but will be uncompressed, where the JPEG option will compress.

                 

                Also, Video is basically at screen resolution, and is only a few pixels x pixels. Do not plan on printing a very large Image from a Video Freeze Frame, as you will probably not be pleased with the quality.

                 

                Good luck,

                 

                Hunt

                • 5. Re: Video Frame Capture
                  A.T. Romano Level 7

                  Hunt

                   

                  What I think that we both forgot to include....frame grabs from video sometimes need to be deinterlaced for better results. If they look OK, I say leave them as is.  I do not see where a send back to Photoshop Elements 11 Full Editor/Filter/Video/de-interlace would be appropriate anymore since that option seems to have disappeared in Photoshop Elements 11 Full Editor. What might be explored if necessary for deinterlacing, is Premiere Elements 11's Field Options/Always Interlace applied to the frame grab on the Timeline.

                   

                  Interestingly, photos from camera do not have fields, so consideration in this regard for them would not be expected.

                   

                  ATR

                  • 6. Re: Video Frame Capture
                    the_wine_snob Level 9

                    ATR,

                     

                    You are correct - depending on the source Video.

                     

                    Good catch,

                     

                    Hunt

                    • 7. Re: Video Frame Capture
                      A.T. Romano Level 7

                      Hunt,

                       

                      Just one other thing that I want mention for clarification purposes. Not sure where you were driving at with

                       

                      Also, Video is basically at screen resolution, and is only a few pixels x pixels. Do not plan on printing a very large Image from a Video Freeze Frame, as you will probably not be pleased with the quality.

                       

                      If you do that freeze frame grab in the Premiere Elements 11 Edit area with Tools/Freeze Frame, the resolution of the .bmp image will be that of the project settings (project preset/new project dialog). So, in Premiere Elements 11 with the NTSC AVCHD Full HD1080i30 project settings, all the freeze frames with Tools/Freeze frame will be 1920 x 1080 pixels .bmp. And, if you use the Publish+Share/Computer/Image, the freeze frames there (jpegs) have a preset for 1920 x 1080 as well as for other possible sizes.

                       

                      ATR.

                      • 8. Re: Video Frame Capture
                        the_wine_snob Level 9

                        ATR,

                         

                        The Frame Size of the Freeze Frame WILL match the Frame Size of the Project. However, when Opened in Photoshop, or most Image-editing software, it will show up with the pixel x pixel dimensions @ ~ 72 PPI. When printing, that 72 PPI, translated to DPI, will not be producing a really sharp print.

                         

                        If, say one wished to print an 8 x 10 inch Image on a desktop, inkjet printer, that looked really good, they would want an Image that was 3000 x 2400 @ 300 PPI/DPI, though that might depend on the exact printer used (some do a very nice job at only 240 PPI/DPI).

                         

                        If one wished to go larger than 8 x 10 inches, then the quality will definitely be lower, and easily seen.

                         

                        If one is printing, say a 4 x 6 inch/5 x 7 inch Image, then things will usually be OK, provided that they are starting with a 1920 x 1080 Frame Size. If they are starting with 720 x 480, then there will be an even greater quality hit.

                         

                        If quality is considered, I would not choose the JPEG option, but that is probably more personal, as I do not like the JPEG compression, and avoid it, unless a client demands JPEG. I choose PNG, or TIFF, if the client cannot use a PSD. Some people do not see the JPEG compression, but maybe I spent too many years doing high-end advertising photography, to really love it.

                         

                        Hunt

                        • 9. Re: Video Frame Capture
                          HarleyTDavis Level 2

                          I am with you pal.  Jpeg never has the same quality as an original when viewed up close, and discerning pros will definitely be looking close.  However, when outputting your work, always consider your target.  I do a lot of posts to my Facebook with photographs.  I start with 8megapixel images, crop and enlarge in camera raw, clean some dust, save them in TIFF, then run automation actions in photoshop to add watermarks and save for web, with settings that are conducive to the type of image (action still, steady still, noise reduced still), which saves as Jpeg in a 1920x1080 or similar size based on the crop.  This saves a high def image with some smoothing of the pixels, with a standardized internet rgb color balance.  It holds fairly close to the real file, and from screen size, it's really difficult to tell a difference without pressing your face against the screen.  By compressing with the save for web, I can control the smooth\sharp compression artifacts to a greater degree, and I can ensure a smaller file size for use on the web.  Since most of my audience will sit back and enjoy (i.e., not the most discerning of eyes and not pressing faces against their screen), Jpeg will do fine.

                           

                          As for screen caps from video... ...they are never clear when using a single frame.  If you can find two or more frames that don't have motion, export all of them, and have them process together, like with photoshop auto blend, you can usually get better results.  Personally, I process each as an HDR.  The best way I've found for extracting the frames is to create a dupe sequence, then add edit marks around the frames you want, export that to AE, and have AE export to image files as TIFF.  Then I go to work.  I dupe each frame at least twice, and process dark, and light, adding clarity and processing for the detail in each, then I process the main image for the smoother details like solids or skin tones, and combine each set to make an HDR, then I stack the TIFFs again, auto blend and make any adjustments to get the detail.

                           

                          I use this when making the main menus of some video discs.  It's an emotional linkup when you're working on a family oriented project (wedding, bar\bat mitzvah, christening, baptism, etc), and it always ups the sell when you show the previews.  On faster systems this doesn't take long, but on my mobile setup, the processing takes hours, while the actual work is more like minutes.  It results in great images, with exceptional clarity.  Even when compressed, they retain better sharpness.