7 Replies Latest reply on May 23, 2013 6:22 PM by BingoFriday

    Color Correcting Help!

    Arturo8 Level 1

      I shot a bunch of timelapse clips (12 and 15fps) with two GoPro3's and transcoded them in the GoPro software, Cineform Studio, because PP5.5 apparently does not natively handle MP4's.  I made them universally 1080 and 29.97fps AVI's for import into Premiere 5.5 (on my mac). 

       

      While doing so, I also did minor color corrections.  However, as I start to lay them side by side in Premiere I see that I did a poor job and that they look very different.

       

      As a result, I have two problems:

       

      1) I have no idea how to use Premiere's color many correcting tools.

      2) Assuming I can figure a tool out, if I must correct each clip in the sequence individually, then there is no reason why I will not again make them all look different from each other.

       

      Is there a way to make all the clips conform to a target value, with each changing the appropriate amount from it's own, current values to match it?  For example, can I take one clip, adjust it's values (basically just white balance, brightness and contrast), and ask the rest to match it regardless of how close or far they currently are from it?  I hope I've asked this question correctly.

        • 1. Re: Color Correcting Help!
          Biggles Lamb Level 3

          This is something we cannot write an easy responses to as it will go into pages and pages, its far better if you look at some video tutorials

           

          Go to www.linda.com and search for colour video tutorials

           

          Also on the Creative Cow website there are plenty of color tutorials related to Premiere, start off with this and then work your way through each, as they progressively will take you through each of the waveform monitors that are in Premiere and then onto color correction

           

          http://library.creativecow.net/devis_andrew/Color-Correction-1_Premiere-Pro/1

           

          But of all those I have seen the best by a long way is a guy called Matthew Scott

           

          http://mattscottvisuals.com/color/

           

          Matt has plenty on his site and whilst primarily related to Edius the processes are very similar

          • 2. Re: Color Correcting Help!
            Arturo8 Level 1

            I take it the answer is no and, unfortunately, I don't have time to learn color correction as much as I should do so.  I have to cut this by Tuesday and am shooting 12 hour days this weekend.  I basically have to cut this by tomorrow afternoon.

             

            What that means is that I'll re-transcode all the footage and output it without color correction so that it all looks the same.  I'll learn some kind of auto correction and apply it to the whole sequence.

            • 3. Re: Color Correcting Help!
              joe bloe premiere Level 5

              The Three Way Color Corrector is probably the

              most intuitive CC effect for a beginner in a hurry.

              Here are a couple of short tutorials:

               

              Three-way Color Corrector effect (CS6)

              http://helpx.adobe.com/premiere-pro/using/three-way-color-corrector-cs6.html

              Using the Three Way Color Corrector

              http://www.video2brain.com/en/lessons/using-the-three-way-color-corrector

               

              You can copy > paste the Three Way Color Corrector effect

              from one clip to another as a starting point for additional clips.

               

              Also, you can use an Adjustment Layer to apply a single

              color correction effect across multiple clips.

              Here's a short tutorial + documentation:

               

              Using the New Adjustment Layers in Premiere Pro CS6

              http://tv.adobe.com/watch/cs6-creative-cloud-feature-tour-for-video/using-the-new-adjustme nt-layers-in-premiere-pro-cs6/

              Adobe Premiere Pro Help / Adjustment Layers (CS6)

              http://helpx.adobe.com/premiere-pro/using/help-tutorials-adjustment-layers.html

              • 4. Re: Color Correcting Help!
                cfg_2451 Level 2

                Arturo8 wrote:

                 

                I take it the answer is no and, unfortunately, I don't have time to learn color correction as much as I should do so.  I have to cut this by Tuesday and am shooting 12 hour days this weekend.  I basically have to cut this by tomorrow afternoon.

                Color correction / grading takes time. Don't leave that time out of the schedule. It's hard to do a good job in less than the time required. Been there, done that, learned it the hard way. Like you're doing now.

                 

                Arturo8 wrote:

                 

                I'll learn some kind of auto correction and apply it to the whole sequence.

                Um.... you might try. But there is no "auto correction" that will automatically read your mind and create a beautiful grade that seamlessly meshes all your cuts into a fully finished Hollywood blockbuster. If there were, there'd be a lot of finishing houses out of work. And that hasn't happened.

                 

                Color correction is a painstakingly picky operation that has to be done clip by clip. Color grading is another proposition altogether, and requires a vision of how the final picture should look so that it reinforces the story by provoking the right feelings in the viewer at the right time. This, takes talent, creativity, subtlety, and much experience.

                 

                A good place to start learning about it is Van Hurkman's Color Correction Handbook. Best technical book I've seen, and well worth the read from anyone interested in the topic.

                • 5. Re: Color Correcting Help!
                  Arturo8 Level 1

                  Sorry, you typed "um."  I'm not clear on what that means in this context.  It's like typing "achoo" if you sneeze while you're typing?  Apologies, I don't understand.

                   

                  Also, we appear to have gotten a bit off topic so many thanks anyway for trying.

                  • 6. Re: Color Correcting Help!
                    dsfsdsdfsdffdsf Level 2

                    Arturo8 wrote:

                     

                    2) Assuming I can figure a tool out, if I must correct each clip in the sequence individually, then there is no reason why I will not again make them all look different from each other.

                     

                    Is there a way to make all the clips conform to a target value, with each changing the appropriate amount from it's own, current values to match it?  For example, can I take one clip, adjust it's values (basically just white balance, brightness and contrast), and ask the rest to match it regardless of how close or far they currently are from it?  I hope I've asked this question correctly.

                     

                    There's no substitute for careful manual grading but at a pinch Auto Levels and Auto Color will get you in the ballpark of neutral, reasonably exposed shots. Beware there is a good to high chance of flickering at a result of using these filters, so check carefully and dial in some temporal filtering if necessary.

                     

                    My method is to balance the shots by 1) neutralising the color temperature, 2) adjust the black, white and mid points to roughly have the same density, 3) apply any stylistic looks over the top. It's all practise though, and the more you do the more intuitive and faster you'll work.

                     

                    The CC release of Speedgrade supposedly has some auto correction tools added, but that's not much help to you in the time being.

                    • 7. Re: Color Correcting Help!
                      BingoFriday Level 1

                      Sometimes and I'm just saying sometimes - duplicating your clip - stacking above the otheron the timeline and using a blending mode on it can do wonders. Also, for white balance issues - sometimes - if you're in a hurry - making a color color matte from the new items menu - and using the blending mode method can work - maybe even - between the original and the duplicate clip on the stack in the time line.