2 Replies Latest reply on May 29, 2013 3:58 PM by project_c

    tiny mov import from PS kills AE

    project_c

      Not sure if this is a bug or if I'm doing something wrong. I'm making tiny animations in Photoshop, (72dpi greyscale 10cm x 10cm, approx 2 seconds length, filesize around 22k). I then export from Photoshop at the default setting, Quicktime in .mov format.

       

      I then import this into AE (where I already have 2 huge .mov files, over 250Mb, playing, which were rendered out of AE and imported back in - these are playing back without any problems or issues.) The tiny imported animations slow down AE to the point of rendering it totally useless, spinning wheel of doom etc. Does anyone have a clue why this is happening? I have a very fast system and AE can cope with many multi-layered huge files without any issues, but this particular problem just freezes AE up almost completely.

       

      Using latest version of AE and PS CS5 extended. (maybe I should be using the latest version of PS too, I just haven't got round to installing it yet).

      IMac 3.4Ghz Intel Core i7, 16GB memory.

       

      thanks

        • 1. Re: tiny mov import from PS kills AE
          Dave LaRonde Level 6

          I'm making tiny animations in Photoshop, (72dpi greyscale 10cm x 10cm, approx 2 seconds length, filesize around 22k). I then export from Photoshop at the default setting, Quicktime in .mov format.

           

           

          Ah, a classic example of Photoshop thinking!  It's time to think in After Effects.

           

          Forget all about dpi.  The concept doesn't exist in AE.  Photoshop only utilizes it as a handy guide for common video resolutions, and it's becoming less useful every day.  AE deals in PIXELS:  the number of horizontal pixels  and vertical pixels in a comp.  DPI is completely irrelevant.

           

          Here's an example: In Phiotoshop at 400 DPI, a 1-inch x 1-inch image has dimensions of 400x400 pixels.  At 100 DPI, a 4-inch x 4-inch image has dimensions of 400x400 pixels.  Imported into AE, both images are precisely the same size: 400x400 pixels

           

          And if DPI means, "dots per INCH",  it must be tough to work in metric linear measures like centimeters, n'est-ce pas?

           

           

           

          I then export from Photoshop at the default setting, Quicktime in .mov format.

           

          The ".mov" file extension simply indicates that the file is a quicktime movie.  Quicktime movies are simply media containers.  The file can be encoded via a ny number of schemes, called Codecs.  Here's a metaphor: an .mov file is a bottle.  A bottle can hold many different kinds of liquids: beer, milk, water, juice, gasoline... you get the idea.  Those liquids are the codecs.

           

          The codecs of some Quicktime Movies don't work well in After Effects.  Your configuration of Photoshop may default to one of the bad ones: we can't tell.  But you can --  highlight the problem footage in the project window and look at the information at the very top.  The identity of the codec will be revealed there.

           

          Clearer now?

          • 2. Re: tiny mov import from PS kills AE
            project_c Level 1

            Thanks for the reply, I get the pixel / ppi issue, and you're right, after many years of use, my thinking is firmly embedded in Photoshop logic..

             

            In the meantime I've found a solution to this, I have tried exporting as mpeg-4 and that actually seems to work very well for this purpose. I will come back if I run into further problems. Thanks again!