10 Replies Latest reply on May 6, 2016 12:48 AM by Laubender

    Fonts in linked images cause printing problems

    whitworth916

      This is not a question as I have already solved this issue, I just wanted to save someone else the time.

       

      Problem: Print job stops half way through document

      Error Code: 49.4C02

      Printer: HP line (3 different models)

      Program used: InDesign CS6 from Creative Cloud

       

      I had printed this job before and never had an issue. Then one day after many textual edits, the PDF stopped printing and would send the printers into a Fatal error which caused them to reboot. I had no idea what had happened or why. All I could remember changing was text. It was printing on some printers, but none of the printers on my floor. At first I thought the file was corrupt, so I resaved it. And resaved it, and resaved it. I saved it out with every type of export setting. I even replaced vector illustrations with crummy jpeg images. Still, not working. My boss is kind of an important guy for the government, so when he started to get upset, we all started to scramble for a solution.

       

      Research suggested that we update the firmware which did not work.

       

      I was suspicious of potential problem fonts, though it confused me as they had printed before. I opened the PDF and went to Properties > Fonts and saw a Type 1 font. Not familiar with this, I Googled it and after reading a bajillion websites, still could not find the answer in removing it.

       

      Now at this point, I had removed all of that font family (Type > Find Font > Replace), exported, opened PDF, still there! WTF, really? InDesign could no longer find this font.

       

      Here's what happened.

       

      Well, because in the new CS6, Preflight is no longer something that you have to manually go to, it works automatically similar to dynamic spell checking. My document did not have any errors, but I knew it HAS to have some sort of error. I went to the Preflight window (Window > Output > Preflight), clicked on the menu tab and went to "Define Profiles...". Well, well, well. Because the 'Default' setting put in place by Adobe does not actively have "Font Types Not Allowed" selected, it was not catching the Type 1 font that was causing a day of wasted IT resources and my sanity.

       

      I made a new Profile, checked "Font Types Not Allowed", checked ALL of the "Type 1" options, saved and let it scan. What's this?! 1 error!? Hmmmm... it was coming from a linked .eps file! I opened the file, I must have forgotten to outline the font during all of the changes. And I'm assuming that because the font was linked via an element, that when InDesign went to export all of the fonts, it did not have access or did not know what to do with the font that was in my .eps file, so what it did was turned it INTO a Type 1 font (or as I learned, a PostScript font) and embedded it along with all of my other fonts into the PDF. Which is why when I was trying to find this font earlier, it couldn't be found because it wasn't IN the document, it was LINKED to the document. This font on its own prints fine, but it gets converted to a PostScript font when it is within a linked element within InDesign.

       

      My whole office did a dance of victory once we fixed the problem. Ridiculous. So I hope now, if someone ends up having the same problem I did, now they know where to look to find the problem! It would have saved everyone here some time if the default "basic" preflight wasn't so "basic".

        • 1. Re: Fonts in linked images cause printing problems
          Willi Adelberger Most Valuable Participant
          1. Why are you using EPS files? Don't use them. If the linked file comes from Illustrator use AI or PDF! If the File comes from Photoshop use PDF if it contains fonts, otherwise PSD.
          2. Type 1 fonts shoul not be a problem anyway, InDesign has no problem with T1 in any case. The problem must be somewhere else. I would recommend to use PostScript Open Type Font (OTF).
          3. You should NEVER outline fonts for printing purposes. Not in linked graphics, never in InDesign. It is not a good idea because you are destroying the font information, not only the ability to edit it alone. Only for graphic purposes or in a logo or symbol I would do it.
          4. My interesting would be which export settings you used to create the pdf and WHY, WHY you use EPS? (Which seems to be more than a simple graphic like a bar code.)

           

           

          Please make shorter statements, it is not needed to write a personal curriculum of the past Years to understand a techical problem with a program.

          • 2. Re: Fonts in linked images cause printing problems
            whitworth916 Level 1

            First off, I was only offering my experience for others who were having similar problems as I did.

             

            1. I don't know why I used the EPS. I have the file saved in all formats .ai, .eps, .pdf, .png, and .jpg. I was using .ai in my InDesign document, this happened to be the only one, why? I don't know why I choose the eps at the time, it was probably an accident.

             

            2. Type 1 isn't a problem... UNLESS your printer does not support PostScript fonts. Which was the problem. I know to use OTF and TTF fonts, thank you.

             

            3. Thank you for your opinion. But here's an example of when you should, when you pass the document around and others will open it WITHOUT access to any special fonts you used. Yes, you outline then to keep the font. Yes it's uneditable.

             

            4. I tried all export settings and custom settings.

             

            I find your response rather offensive. As if I am a complete fool and am unfamiliar with everything you've mentioned. Just so you know, there are some people in the industry who still use .eps files for large print projects. I didn't post this for someone to "educate" me. I posted it because I came across a rather odd problem, that I would never have thought up on my own, and when searching for the solution, many others had similar problems with no answers. I was trying to help others who come across this random incident. I wrote it as a story, excuse me. Don't like my writing style? Don't read it.

            • 3. Re: Fonts in linked images cause printing problems
              Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

              It's a pretty rare printer that doesn't support T1 fonts, I think. I suspect you might not have embedded the fonts into the .eps file and weren't set to upload them to the printer with the job (if they were still installed).

              • 4. Re: Fonts in linked images cause printing problems
                whitworth916 Level 1

                They were HP Laserjets 3500, C3525, and 4650C that I later learned did not have the postscript drivers installed, they were just out of the box. Other printers of the same model printed fine, but they had the drivers installed.

                 

                To be honest, I don't know why I didn't have the font outlined to begin with, it was a logo file that was linked. Perhaps I left it open waiting for final approval, but then forgot to outline them thereafter. I most likely selected the .eps file by accident as all my other linked items are .ai, .pdf, .jpg/.png. 

                 

                So it probably was the perfect storm: fonts not outlined or embedded into a linked file to a printer without the drivers. The font itself is an OTF, InDesign converted it to Type 1, probably by what you stated (not being embedded and probably because it was linked).

                I just wish that the default Preflight settings included checking for postscript fonts... as not every printer has those drivers and to assume they do...

                • 5. Re: Fonts in linked images cause printing problems
                  Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                  You don't need to use a postscript driver to print T1 fonts, as far as I know. I used to use them near exclusively before the advent of OpenType (most of which are actually also Type1 font outlines  -- OT is a "wrapper" format that magically eliminates the need for having the printer font half or maybe the screen font half -- not sure which -- and allows what would normally be an OS-specific font to be read cross-paltform) and I've printed many a document using them on PCL printers. I think there was some sort of "perfect storm" here, but I wouldn't lay the blame on the font format.

                  • 6. Re: Fonts in linked images cause printing problems
                    whitworth916 Level 1

                    I agree, as the Type 1 fonts didn't have a problem on any other printer.

                    • 7. Re: Fonts in linked images cause printing problems
                      Willi Adelberger Most Valuable Participant

                      whitworth916 schrieb:

                       

                      First off, I was only offering my experience for others who were having similar problems as I did.

                       

                       

                      3. Thank you for your opinion. But here's an example of when you should, when you pass the document around and others will open it WITHOUT access to any special fonts you used. Yes, you outline then to keep the font. Yes it's uneditable.

                       

                      I find your response rather offensive. As if I am a complete fool and am unfamiliar with everything you've mentioned.

                      It is not only my opinion, when someone has not the used font, please export the file to PDF and send the PDF with embedded fonts. That is the way how missing fonts on the recipients computer are handled. In your case it is a logo, ok, as I mentioned before, in a logo I would outline the font too.

                      With outlining a font, e.g. in InDesign you loose not only the editibility but also automatic numbers and bullets, frame color & stroke with all effects applied on them, paragraph rulers, underline, strike through and many issues more, also missing metrics can cause a different setting (space between letters) after a font is outlined. And it is also impossible to outline automatic placeholder from the master without releasing them, but releasing them can cause a different order of items and will result in different  text wrapping and a changed layout. If you want these things happen, do it.

                      Maybe that I am offensive, but I never considered you as a fool.

                      • 8. Re: Fonts in linked images cause printing problems
                        whitworth916 Level 1

                        I didn't outline the entire document, I never said that. It seems as though you are assuming that I did. I outlined a few custom fonts that I was using as headlines (that I knew would not be changed).  I know you lose editability when you outline fonts... I did this as a process of elimination to find the problem, not as a general practice. I'm sorry you didn't understand that when I wrote it originally.

                        • 9. Re: Fonts in linked images cause printing problems
                          Dsastray Level 1

                          Just wanted to thank you for your post. I am tracking something similar down - haven't quite nailed it - and frankly appreciate the detail, and a touch of humor never hurts (most people).

                          • 10. Re: Fonts in linked images cause printing problems
                            Laubender Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                            Hi Dsastray,

                            since this is an older thread here and you are not sure about what exactly has hit you, I'd suggest that you open a separate new thread with a speaking title.

                             

                            If you have issues with placed EPS files and fonts saved with them, I would test distilling a PDF out of them using Adobe Distiller that comes with Adobe Acrobat, preflight the PDF in Adobe Acrobat and place the PDFs to see, if that will work.

                             

                            If the EPS files are exported from Adobe Illustrator and you have access to the original AI file, I'd resave the AI files using the include PDF representation and place the AI files. Often customers provide EPS files of unknown sources, then it's good to check some basics by distilling them to PDF before using the EPSs or better place the distilled PDFs (preferable).

                             

                            Hopefully it's not necessary to convert text to outlines, neither in a EPS or PDF or in InDesign to get a page printed.
                            Of course it will depend on a lot of details concerning the used font and the placed file format.

                             

                            Uwe