1 Reply Latest reply on Jun 20, 2013 4:20 PM by ECBowen

    Retina Macbook Pro - All SSD workflow?


      Looking at purchasing a Retina Macbook Pro. I want the model with 16GB of ram which means it will have 768GB of SSD storage.


      Obviously an ideal setup would use more than one drive for read/write and scratch. When I'm in the field or mobile I won't have that luxury. I don't do heavy video eiditng, most of what I produce are 1-2 minute shorts shot on a Canon 60D or Canon XF105. I also do some After Effects work and Illustrator design, but nothing that's high intensity by any means.


      My main concern is all that read/write to the SSD. I've read hit or miss reports on SSD issues and reliablity long term. This won't be my primary machine, just a backup/mobile setup if I want to get out of the office and do some lighter editing at a coffee shop or demo my video with a client. I'm even thinking of cutting video on the laptop and then moving project files to my PC tower for final rendering. 


      So is there a real concern about the SSD long-term sustanibility? My other thought was just to purchase a non-retina MBP with the same processor/RAM/GPU since it wouldn't have the SSD, yet the SSD speed increase was something I was looking forward too. I guess it even comes down to which drive (SSD or regular) is best for a mobile, single drive setup?


      Any help is appreciated. thanks!

        • 1. Re: Retina Macbook Pro - All SSD workflow?
          ECBowen Most Valuable Participant

          One of the biggest benefits of SSD drives over mechanical drives is latency. SSD drives have a Random access in microseconds. Mechanical drives latency is in milliseconds. This means an SSD drive can read multiple files simultaneously without any trouble and would be fine for the workflow you list where as a mechanical drive would not be. I would also suggest taking a 2.5 USB3 drive with you incase you do require a seperate drive for media. The SSD drive may fill up quick so having an extra drive to dump to is never bad especially if USB3 or TB. I would not worry about the Permanent erase write cycles on the SSD drives. The SSD manufacturers use so many mathematical tricks to avoid using those that you can write to those drives every day for years and not burn out the MLC. Bad reports on SSD drives now are related to bad firmware, manufacturing/QC, or end user knowledge and not just because they are SSD's.