3 Replies Latest reply on Jul 8, 2013 8:50 PM by buck415

    Japanese - InDesign to ePub to Kindle

    buck415 Level 1

      Product: InDesign CC (CC Member)

       

      Hi everyone.

       

      I'm currently writing a book that utilizes some Japanese kanji and wanted to ask some questions about how to manage the Japanese words in the English version of InDesign.

       

      Question 1:

       

      Within Illustrator I can easily type vertically from right to left. I have not been able to locate the veritcal type tool in InDesign at this time... do I just have my tool blinders on, preventing me from seeing what's right in front of me, or do I need to fanagle things around to get vertical type into my document?

       

      Question 2:

       

      Since I began to study Japanese last week, it's likely I'll be using it quite a lot in the future. As a CC member, can I install and both versions of InDesign, the English and Japanese?

       

      Question 3:

       

      Ultimately I need to get my document that includes kanji into Kindle format, and Kindle is still on the (deprecated?) Latin ISO, not UTF-8. My test PDF exports display the font fine, as a font... but my concern is that by the time they get into the Kindle, they won't look like fonts but rather some esoteric and mystical computer-speak code. What is the best way for me to get the kanji to appear the way that it should in the Kindle?

       

      Thanks,

      Buck

        • 1. Re: Japanese - InDesign to ePub to Kindle
          David W. Goodrich Level 3

          Question 1: English language AI has long had Japanese text-processing features, but access to the corresponding capabilities in stock versions of ID is only available in the CJK versions; this may continue in IDCC.  One alternative is to use the World Tools Pro add-on, but I am not sure that has been updated for IDCC (the IDCS6 version took a while).

           

          Question 2: In the past, it has not been possible to install different language versions of the same version of ID (for example, both the Japanese and English versions of IDCS4).  Moreover CJK versions of ID have had interfaces only in C, J, or K (unlike Quark, which at one time let you run, say, the Japanese version with an English-language interface).

           

          Question 3: I dunno.  The great thing about PDF for CJK is that it embeds the fonts, giving you full control over the text.  However, I'm not sure PDF readers available for Kindle implement CJK properly.

           

          EPub3 adds a bunch of features for CJK text, including vertical writing and even furigana phonetic notations.  Unfortunately, I wouldn't count on popular e-readers fully implementing Epub3 anytime soon.

           

          I wish the news were better.  Good luck!

           

          David

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Japanese - InDesign to ePub to Kindle
            David W. Goodrich Level 3

            A second thought: you can fake vertical columns of CJK in stock English ID by making a text frame just wide enough for a single character, and you can thread a bunch of these together right to left -- not elegant but it does the job and will look ok in a PDF.  But you'd have to test how well this converts to e-readers such as Kindle.

             

            There are also the old TechArt/TransPacific templates allowing non-CJK versions of ID access to some CJK features, but again you'll have to test to see if they'll serve.

             

            David

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Japanese - InDesign to ePub to Kindle
              buck415 Level 1

              Hi David.

               

              Well, Kindle is Amazon's problem and the growing demand will require Amazon to eventually upgrade their product to be UTF-8 compatible sooner than later.

               

              Your suggestions are very good. I believe the easiest solution for me at this time is to use Illustrator, convert the fonts to an outline, and then simply place that image file within InDesign.

               

              Thank you.