9 Replies Latest reply on Jul 10, 2013 2:44 AM by Peter Spier

    Alternating Footers

    GuyLydig1

      I want to use InDesign CS6 to set up a 300-page book with 40 chapters. I want the footers to contain page numbers that run continuously from 1-300. On the odd pages, the footer should be on the right side; on the even pages, the footer should be on the left.

       

      I also want to include the chapter title for each chapter together with the page numbers.

       

      I cannot use facing pages because the publisher I am using said that they must be single pages.

       

      Must I use 80 masters, one for odd pages and one for even pages, for each of the 40 chapters?

       

      This is the first time I am using InDesign so excuse my ignorance...

       

      TIA

       

      Guy

        • 1. Re: Alternating Footers
          Willi Adelberger Most Valuable Participant

          No, you have to set up your document with FACING PAGES and create your PDF upon PDF Export (print) as single pages.

          GuyLydig1 wrote:

           

          I want to use InDesign CS6 to set up a 300-page book with 40 chapters. I want the footers to contain page numbers that run continuously from 1-300. On the odd pages, the footer should be on the right side; on the even pages, the footer should be on the left.

           

          I also want to include the chapter title for each chapter together with the page numbers.

           

          I cannot use facing pages because the publisher I am using said that they must be single pages.

           

          Must I use 80 masters, one for odd pages and one for even pages, for each of the 40 chapters?

           

          This is the first time I am using InDesign so excuse my ignorance...

           

          TIA

           

          Guy

          Set up your Master Page, you need, as your descriptions indicate, to set up 1 spread Master Pages. No need to set up the document as single pages.

          The chapters can be done with text variables, section markers or similar things, so you need not to set up several Master Pages for different chapters.

          • 2. Re: Alternating Footers
            GuyLydig1 Level 1

            THANK YOU!

             

            A follow-up, if I may:

            I would very much appreciate guidance on how to use "text variables, section markers or similar things" in a footer to:

            1) Number the 300 pages in the book continuously from 1-300 and

            2) Have the chapter titles change for each chapter.

             

            I tried experimenting with text variables and I see that I can create a custom text variable but if I use a one-page spread Master Page, I don't know how to get the custom variable to change at each chapter. I looked at sections as well, but as far as I see, that is for numbering, not for changing text according to chapter titles.

             

            Ideally, I would want the variable to simply "read" the first line of text in a specific font/size (i.e.: each chapter title is TNR/16 pt.) and continue using that in the footer until the next occurrence of TNR/16 pt. at which point it should use the new text in TNR/16 until the next occurrence, etc.

             

            Alternatively, I can create custom variable text for each chapter title by simply typing 40 titles but in any case, I don't see how, using a one-page spread Master Page, I can tell the Footer to change when the chapter changes.

             

            Any help or advice you can give this newbie is very much appreciated.

             

            Guy

            • 3. Re: Alternating Footers
              Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

              For the page numbering you use the Current Page Marker special character (from the Insert Special Character > Markers... list). For your chapters, assign a unique paragraph style to the chapter names and then you can use a Running Header variable.

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: Alternating Footers
                GuyLydig1 Level 1

                Each chapter was originally a Word document and all chapters were then assembled as one PDF. The PDF was then placed in InDesign. I believe that may be why the Running Footer cannot read the chapter names.

                 

                Is there a way around this? Can I prepare a list of Chapter titles and assign pages for the Running Footer to read from?

                 

                When you respond, please remember that I have no background in InDesign at all.

                 

                Thank you

                • 5. Re: Alternating Footers
                  Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                  Why not place the Word files directly (that's the normal workflow so that you can edit the text if you need to). ID's typography controls are far superior to that in Word, so you'll get a nicer looking file to boot.

                   

                  It that's not an option, however, you can add new text frames onthe document pages where necessary and put the cahpter names you want to appear in the headers in those frames. If you do that, select these frames and go to Window > Output > Attributes and check the Non-Printing checkbox so they will not be included inthe final output. You may also want to group them with the frames tha hold the corresponding PDF page so they move together id something needs to be shuffled. As an alternative you can alos put these ne text frames on a separate layer and mark that as non-printing, but you cannot group objects on different layers.

                  • 6. Re: Alternating Footers
                    Willi Adelberger Most Valuable Participant

                    As Peter said, place the Word files directly in InDesign. I suppose you have them because of the other question you had in June in the Acrobat Forum which sounded a little bit similar.

                    I would also recommend to prepair the print document completely in InDesign not only because of the better typographic control but also for the reliability to get a working print document. Word allows false styles which are a problem for the printer, Word has also not a CMYK workflow, Word does not support any professionell vector type, all this things can cause problems in the printing procss which you can avoid when you set up the document in InDesign. You have also superior export possibilites to pdf for print and for web from the same file.

                    • 7. Re: Alternating Footers
                      GuyLydig1 Level 1

                      I placed a Word document into InDesign but the Footnotes and Text Boxes  got totally messed up so I don't think this is a viable option since both footnotes and text boxes are liberally sprinkled throughout the document.

                       

                      I haven't yet tried Peter's idea about frames but I will--as soon as I figure out how (remember--this is the first time I am using InDesign--and I had no lessons!). You are right, Mr. Adelberger, about this being the same file I asked about last month. I'm still wrestling with it.

                       

                      I suppose I can resort to creating a facing pages Master Document for each chapter and typing the chapter title into both footers (left and right) in each Master. I have three books to create, each with 42 chapters, so I was hoping to automate this a bit but it's got to get done--one way or the other.

                       

                      Your suggestion about exporting to a PDF as separate pages is a life saver.

                       

                      Question: The pictures/graphics are not sharp when I print. Do you know if changing the Resolution from 72 to 300 dpi and the JPEG Quality from Medium to Maximum will make a significant difference? Also, what should the setting be for Compression: JPEG (Lossy), JPEG 2000 (Lossless), or Automatic?

                       

                      I appreciate the help from both Mr. Spier and Mr. Adelberger.

                       

                      Guy

                      • 8. Re: Alternating Footers
                        Willi Adelberger Most Valuable Participant

                        If the images are sharp when printed depends on several factors:

                        • What is the quality and resolution (ppi not dpi) of the original files..
                        • What is the content and is the type best for content? E.g. if a vector graphic or/and text in the image, an ai file would be best for InDesign, but for Word it would not work.
                        • Where do you place/import/insert the images? In Word, then you are limited to the file types which are supported by word up the supported resolution, and you have to live with a multiple conversion, E.g. in the case of a vector from Ai > JPG (WORD) > JPG (PDF) > JPG (InDesign-Export-PDF), when you place the AI in InDesign you would not even have an image to convert.
                        • 300ppi should be fine for normal images to print, if you wnat to offset print export to a PDF-X-standard conform to your printers request.
                        • 9. Re: Alternating Footers
                          Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                          Sounds like you have a complicated Word file with footnotes and sidebars of some sort, and yes that can cause some issues when importing to ID. The trick to working well is to NOT attempt to format your word files into beautiful pages, just write, and do all the formatting and layout in ID. I won't say footnotes are always imported correctly -- my own work doesn't involve a lot of files with footnotes and I've never had a problem, but there are plenty of reports of Word footnotes getting garbled, and common suggestions are to be sure the Word file is clean by accepting all changes and doing a Save As in word to rewrite the file, as well as to try other formats like .doc if using docx or RTF.

                           

                          As far as image resolution, the resolution saved in the image is essentially meaningless. What matters is the effective resolution after scaling the image on your page. A 1" x 1" image at 300 ppi in photoshop has an effective resolution of only 75 ppi when used at 4" x4" on the page. For print I never recommend jpeg, but if you are making jpegs from other images you should always use the highest quality compression setting available. There's no point, however, in resaving the same medium or low quality jpeg and adjusting the slider to hight quality. You've already damaged the image the first time, and nothing you do now will fix that. Similarly, there's no point in upsampling an existing image as all you are doing is creating new pixels out of thin air and it won't improve the quality.