3 Replies Latest reply on Jul 15, 2013 10:27 AM by Peter Spier

    Printing color photos in grayscale

    Ellis home Level 4

      I have a book with several images in it. Book is being printed in black and white on cream paper. Some of the original images were in color and converted to grayscale using desaturation in Photoshop, saved as JPG and placed in ID. Then exported to PDF using Press Quality set up. But images are showing a bit too dark, the ones with more dark tones. Any ideas how to improve this?

        • 1. Re: Printing color photos in grayscale
          Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

          Convert to Grayscale in Photoshop using the "Black Ink" channel for the CMYK working space in ID which does not respect gray profiles. All Grayscale data is placed directly onthe black plate unchanged.

           

          LoadGray.png

           

          In the screen shot above I've already loaded the black channel for my printer's custom uncoated profile, so you see it in the field and as a choice in the dropdown list. Normally you would choose Load Gray... and then in the resulting dialog chhose your CMYK profile.

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          • 2. Re: Printing color photos in grayscale
            Ellis home Level 4

            Thanks Peter. I think this is a bit over my head. I'm working with the folks at Createspace, so I don't really have a custom profile. The original color photos are JPGs and when I open them in Photoshop are in RGB color space. How do I proceed from here?

            • 3. Re: Printing color photos in grayscale
              Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

              You don't need a custom profile. The point here is that wahtever grayscale numbers you wind up with, those numbers get interpreted as being in the K channel of your CMYK workspace in ID. That could be lighter or darker, or dead on, than you expect depending on the gray profile and the CMYK profile in use.

               

              If you select the same CMYK profile as your ID working space (say, SWOP Coated, for example, if you are using one of the canned settings files like North America Prepress or North America General Purpose) to use as the grayscale space in Photoshop, then when you edit the grayscale in Photoshop your tones should match the output from ID.