4 Replies Latest reply on Jan 25, 2016 8:02 AM by Ndigent

    Redefine paragraph style to match unstyled selection

    elmimmo

      How do I redefine an existing style to match the formatting of a text selection that does not have said style still assigned.

       

      As far as I know you can only refine a style to match a text selection that has that style already applied to it plus some formatting overrides. Contrary to what the Help states:

       

      When you apply a paragraph style, character styles and other previous formatting remain intact.

       

      the selected text's formatting will change upong being assigned a style either by clicking on the style or by going to the Paragraph Styles' palette and choosing "assign style" instead of "assign styles, remove overrides" (translated from Spanish), so I see no way to get to the "redefine style" command without having previously modified the formatting of the text which I want the style to match.

       

      Sure, I can instead select the text, create a new style with a temporary name, delete the old one, and rename the new one to the name of that old one. That is too prone to errors, though, as there are many style settlings that would be easy to miss, such as "based on" and "following" style relations.

       

      I already have the formatting that I want and a list of styles with the naming that I want. How do I match the latter to the former?

        • 1. Re: Redefine paragraph style to match unstyled selection
          Willi Adelberger Most Valuable Participant
          1. Create a small frame with a dummy text and apply the Paragraph Style you want to change.
          2. Double click on the eyedropper tool
          3. Select all text formatting attributes but no paragraph or character style
          4. Select the dummy text with the text tool
          5. Use now the Eyedropper Tool and select with it the original text
          6. The dummy text has changed its appearance, the Paragraph Style's name should have a "+" added. In the Paragraph Style Panel select from the panel's menu "Redefine Style".
          7. Now you can delete the dummy text frame.
          • 2. Re: Redefine paragraph style to match unstyled selection
            Ndigent

            I've just migrated over from QuarkXPress, and had a wonderful plugin called ...<drumroll> ... "Redefine Stylesheet"

             

            You could just place your cursor in a paragraph, select the name of the style from the RS palette, and click.

             

            The selected stylesheet would adopt the ¶ traits of wherever the cursor was.

             

            Didn't realize how good I had it til now, without it...

            • 3. Re: Redefine paragraph style to match unstyled selection
              TᴀW Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              Willi has shown one way of doing this.

               

              Perhaps a simpler method is: Place your cursor in the unstyled text. Alt-click to create a new paragraph style in the Paragraph Styles panel. Now just delete the old paragraph style, and when ID asks you what to replace it with, choose the new one. Once you've deleted the old one, you can rename the new one with the same name.

              • 4. Re: Redefine paragraph style to match unstyled selection
                Ndigent Level 1

                TaW,

                Thanks for your idea, I've actually been doing that...

                 

                but the problem isn't doing it once or twice... its doing it 20, 30 times... a day

                 

                I honestly wouldn't have known how important this maneuver was if that Quark XTension hadn't made it so damn quick/easy.

                 

                It really made maintaining accurate stylesheets plausible.

                Redefining is nice, but

                being able to "map" an existing stylesheet

                to an existing block of formatted text which has a different stylesheet applied

                is really powerful

                 

                It might be the kind of thing that seeing in action proves itself.