2 Replies Latest reply on Jul 25, 2013 9:07 PM by JJMack

    Why does Image Processor give wrong results ?

    accafella12

      Hello.

      I was trying to resize some images to 1080 x 1920 (tiff) using Image Processor but the resulting images came out as 1080 x 1620 and the filesize appears to have remained unchanged. Similarly, another time 720 x 576 came out as 720 x 540.

       

      Have i missed something ? Can someone please help, i'm baffled.

       

      Thanks.

        • 1. Re: Why does Image Processor give wrong results ?
          Level 5

          That's perfectly normal and expected behavior.

           

          Quite simply your images do not have the necessary aspect ratio to fill the entire pixel dimensions you're specifying.  It's elementary, grade-school math. 

           

          Your images are not tall enough in the specific cases you mention.

           

          Work out the ratio between 1080 and 1920:  you'll get an aspect ratio of 1:1.77777777777778.  That is exactly the aspect ratio to which you must crop your images first if you absolutely want those exact pixel dimensions (width x height).

           

          Other than that, the image processor is working exactly as it should.

           

          You can't fit a round peg into a square hole, so to speak.

          • 2. Re: Why does Image Processor give wrong results ?
            JJMack Most Valuable Participant

            The Image Processor Scripts use Adobe Fit Image plug-in to do the resize. It looks like you trying to resize to fit a HDTV.  You should set width 1920 and the height to 1080.  All image will be re-size to fit within that size pixel area.  The image will retain their current Aspect Ratio  and not distort.  Image with a 16:9 aspect ratio will be resized 1920 px wide and 1080 px high.  Image with an Aspect ratio wider then 16:9 will be resize 1920 PX  width and x PX high where x is less then <1080. If an images aspect ratio is narrower then 16:9 the image will be resized x PX wide and 1080P X high where x is less the <1920.