3 Replies Latest reply on Jul 30, 2013 5:56 AM by Willam van Weelden

    Context-Sensitive Help for C# Visual Studio Application

    Ruth000

      We are attempting to create a help system for a C# WPF Visual Studio application. The help system should be available offline for users without internet access.

      The help system should include a main-help section and context-sensitive topics produced by clicking on help buttons attached to individual dialogs.

      Clicking F1 and/or selecting a main-help link should produce a default window containing the main help system.

      Clicking on a specific help button on a dialog within the application should produce a context-sensitive help window that has been pre-defined by the tech author.

      The context-sensitive help topics are separate and excluded from the main-help topics and are specific to each dialog that has a help button. The context-sensitive topic explains the individual components of that particular dialog.

      The following context-sensitive window options should have the capability to be pre-defined by the tech author:

      • Window size
      • Number of panes
      • Inclusion/exclusion of a table of contents
      • Inclusion/exclusion of navigation buttons
      • Inclusion/exclusion of a search bar
      • Inclusion/exclusion of browse sequences/bread crumbs

      We want to be able to apply a single .css file (stylesheet) to topics, including context-sensitive help topics.

       

      We have followed the instructions in the Adobe Online Help documents and attempted to use various outputs with the sample code provided with the RoboHelp installation files.

      So far have been unable to achieve this. Any suggestions would be much appreciated!

        • 1. Re: Context-Sensitive Help for C# Visual Studio Application
          Captiv8r Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          Hi there

           

           

          Ruth000 wrote:

           

          ...We have followed the instructions in the Adobe Online Help documents and attempted to use various outputs with the sample code provided with the RoboHelp installation files.

          So far have been unable to achieve this. Any suggestions would be much appreciated!

           

          You listed about seven different things before you made that statement. Are you unable to achieve all of them? Or is it just one or two that is stumping you?

           

          Cheers... Rick

          • 2. Re: Context-Sensitive Help for C# Visual Studio Application
            Ruth000 Level 1

            Thank you for your reply.

             

            The part we are struggling with is having the context-senstive help topic appear in a separate custom-made window that is different from the main-help window. So far all we can do is have a default window appear that we have no access to customise.

             

            We have made a window in Robo-Help that we want to use, but MapIDs can only be assigned to topics, not particular windows. Therefore the context-senstive help appears in the same style window as the main-help topics.

             

            We want the CSH topic to appear in a window that does not contain the navigation buttons, search bar, ToC etc. We want it to only contain info about the particular dialog that has the help button and for there to be  no navigation path to the main-help section. So basically a stand-alone context-sensitive help window produced by clicking on a  help button on a particular dialog.

             

            Please help!

            • 3. Re: Context-Sensitive Help for C# Visual Studio Application
              Willam van Weelden Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              You need to specify the window you want to use in the CSH call. I'm not familiar with the default C# API, but the JavaScript API allows you to set the window you want to use.

               

              For an in-dept overview of your options, see www.wvanweelden.eu/article-category/context-sensitivity

               

              Greet,

               

              Willam