9 Replies Latest reply: Aug 2, 2013 9:19 AM by Rick Gerard RSS

    Is a MPEG h264 faster to render than a QuickTime PNG?

    jhr7719

      I have a 2 minute composition (1920 x 1080). I renered it out once as a mpeg 4 (h264) and resized the final output to 852 x 480. It took roughly 12 minutes. I rendered it out again at the full size (1920 x 1080) as a Quick Time with the PNG sequence codec. It takes over an hour. I know the Quick Time with the PNG sequence codec is a much more high resolution format....so that is why it took longer to render, right?

        • 1. Re: Is a MPEG h264 faster to render than a QuickTime PNG?
          Rick Gerard CommunityMVP

          Given the same frame size, frame rate, and length properly compressed H.264 would require multi pass rendering and would take longer than a lossless or nearly lossless format like QuickTime PNG, but there could be other factors.

           

          I just don't know about your project to be sure. Don't know enough about your system either.

          • 2. Re: Is a MPEG h264 faster to render than a QuickTime PNG?
            jhr7719 Community Member

            Thanks for the response Rick.

             

            The project is a 2 minute 1920 x 1080 composition. The frame rate is 29.97 square pixels. The effects are already pre-rendered. After Effects will only let me do one pass with the h264 codec.

             

            The specs on my system are:

             

            - Dell Precision M4700

             

            - Intel Core i7-3820 QM @ 2.70 GHz

             

            - 8 GB of RAM

             

            - 64-bit OS

             

            - Quadro K2000M

            • 3. Re: Is a MPEG h264 faster to render than a QuickTime PNG?
              Szalam CommunityMVP

              jhr7719 wrote:

               

              After Effects will only let me do one pass with the h264 codec.

              Which is why After Effects is not a good choice for rendering the h.264 codec. You always use the Adobe Media Encoder for that. It won't matter much for some videos, but on many videos it will make a huge difference. You'll get much better-looking video for the same data rate.

              • 4. Re: Is a MPEG h264 faster to render than a QuickTime PNG?
                jhr7719 Community Member

                Thanks for the reply, Szalam. Normally I render out a high resolution Quick Times from AE and then run it through the Media Encoder to create a more polished MP4. I was just wondering why it takes longer to render out a quick time png than it does a mp4 h264 from AE.

                • 5. Re: Is a MPEG h264 faster to render than a QuickTime PNG?
                  Szalam CommunityMVP

                  Does it take the same amount of time if you don't resize the video?

                  • 6. Re: Is a MPEG h264 faster to render than a QuickTime PNG?
                    jhr7719 Community Member

                    See, that's the weird part....I rendered out another MP4 h264 at the full composition size (1920 x 1080) and it rendered much faster than the Quick Time PNG at 1920 x 1080 did.

                    • 7. Re: Is a MPEG h264 faster to render than a QuickTime PNG?
                      J2M2012 Community Member

                      Hi jhr,

                       

                      Using the PNG format frequently myself, I also noticed how much longer my renders took than with a quicktime export. At first, I wondered if the fact of exporting to an image sequence was not longer than exporting to one single quicktime file... But when I tried a TGA sequence export, the render was also much, much faster.

                       

                      Which is when I realized what the problem was : For whatever reason, Multiprocessing doesn't work with the PNG format. And the vicious part is that AE doesn't let you know. MP is not officially disabled like with some MP incompatible effects or expressions. It's still officially on, but it just doesn't work.

                       

                      Try to render your comp in a TGA sequence, and I'm pretty sure it will be as fast as the h264 export.

                       

                      JM

                      • 8. Re: Is a MPEG h264 faster to render than a QuickTime PNG?
                        jhr7719 Community Member

                        Hey J2M2012...that's brilliant! I just did a test and it rendered much quicker. Thanks for the tip! It was driving me crazy.

                        • 9. Re: Is a MPEG h264 faster to render than a QuickTime PNG?
                          Rick Gerard CommunityMVP

                          I was going to ask you about MP.... MOST MOVIE CODECS, avi, mov, wmv, do not support multi processing Some kill it badly. I only have MP turned on if I am not using AE's 3D Ray-tracing turned on, I am not using any 3rd party plug-ins, I am not rendering audio, I am rendering to an image sequence. That's more than 95% of the time that I have MP rendering turned off.

                           

                          How can I take the increase in rendering time you ask? Simple, I never wait for renders unless all my other work is done. I do my work in AE, send the Comps to the Adobe Media Encoder, then jump back in AE, or Premiere, or Photoshop and continue my work as my projects render in the background. That's the only way I can be productive. Working in AE, droping a comp in the Render Cue and then waiting for the render to move to the next step is just not an option. I have not worked that way, or cued things up to render overnight, since the AME has been available.

                           

                          Disk cache, caching previews in the background, and the other workflow improvements do make AE easier to use, and I utilize them but never at full rez. I also never do full frame full rez ram previews, seldom do ram previews longer than a few seconds, or waste time looking at things over and over again and tweaking a frame or two here and there that isn't perfect. Once you gain some experience you will know what you've got when you set up your animation, check a few motion tests, color correct a few critical frames, and send things off to render. I spent years shooting 16mm and 35mm film and sending it off to the lab and except for a very few occasions the first 3 months of my career, I got back exactly what I expected. It's all a part of learning your craft.