6 Replies Latest reply on Aug 3, 2013 8:27 AM by Jim_Simon

    How to create a file that is widely playable and doesn't require re-encoding in Encore?

    Guy Burns Level 1

      Background

      I've put together a pretty-good home theatre (see p34 http://www.mediafire.com/download/z3da0rik3dgj2oq/Digital_Projector_Screens.zip) for showing cinema classics, pre-1960 mostly, as well as my own stuff. Once a month I try and replicate a picture-theatre experience from the 1950s. The before-interval part consists of up to a dozen shorts: a home-theatre promo, some of my own stuff, cigarette commercials from the 1950s, clips from newreels, a cartoon or two. Run time might be 40-60 minutes.

       

      I've done a before-interval show twice now, but the workflow needs speeding up. The encode time is ridiculous. Up to 6 hours. So I've got a plan.

       

       

      The Plan

      1. Use Premiere to trim and scale all the clips I might need for the next year or two. There could several hundred. Export to a format that doesn't need transcoding in Encore. Index and archive.
      2. Import the clips, as needed, into Encore.
      3. Build a Blu-ray disk to ISO format, and burn to disk.

       

      If the clips did not require transcoding in Encore, I could put together a before-interval show in about 20 minutes, including burning. That's the plan. Problem is, my technique seems very complicated, and I'm hoping someone can show me an easier way.

       

       

      Export to m4V format, un multiplexed

      Encore always wants to transcode multiplexed files (other than m2ts) even if they are in Blu-ray format. So, I have to export from Premiere as separate video and audio files, with the video being in m4v format. But… no software other than Premiere and Encore can read and play these m4v files. Why is that? I don't like the idea of archiving files that can only be used by two programs. So…

       

       

      Build a Blu-ray folder to m2ts format

      From Encore, using the m4v files that don't need transcoding, I can quickly Build a Blu-ray folder that will have .m2ts files containing the multiplexed audiio and video (inside the STREAM folder). Another way to get m2ts files is to send the Premiere clips directly to Encore (without exporting), then Build from there. That way I don't have the intermediate m4v files. And I've gained something else:

       

      • VLC can now play these m2ts files;
      • Premiere can import them;
      • Encore treats them as already encoded (when I feed them back in at a later date), so I can prepare a before-interval show in 15 minutes (instead of 6 hours); and
      • if I need to, I can run them through MP4 Tools from where audio and video quickly "passthrough" to mp4 without loss, and the files become widely playable.

       

       

      Recap

      To be able to generate and archive files that can be used by Encore without transcoding, and which are widely playable, I have to:

       

      Export from Premiere > m4v

         Build from Encore > m2ts (for archiving)

            Re-import to Encore at a later date (to quickly generate a before-interval show)

       

      What a carry on. Is there a simpler way of getting 40 minutes of clips out of Premiere that does not require 6-hours transcoding by Encore, and which can be widely played?

        • 2. Re: How to create a file that is widely playable and doesn't require re-encoding in Encore?
          Jim_Simon Level 8

          no software other than Premiere and Encore can read and play these m4v files.

           

          http://download.cnet.com/DAPlayer/3000-13632_4-75755739.html

           

           

           

          Is there a simpler way of getting 40 minutes of clips out of Premiere that does not require transcoding by Encore, and which can be widely played?

           

          The normal method is to export out of PP twice, once as files for authoring and again as files for computer playback.  You can even do both at the same time with Adobe Media Encoder.

          • 3. Re: How to create a file that is widely playable and doesn't require re-encoding in Encore?
            joshweiland Level 2

            Your setup is awesome! Excellent WAF (wife approval factor)!

             

            I do what Jim mentions.  When I create something for DVD or Blu-ray, I'll render out an additional non-multiplexed version in addition to an archive/computer playback version (I usually go with MP4/h.264 files).

             

            Your Blu-ray player might support playing MP4 files, either on a disc or a USB thumb drive.  I'd try exporting one straight from Premiere and see what happens.  For multiple files, you may need to rename them so they play back in the order you'd like.

             

            If your Blu-ray player is compatible with this, and this still provides the functionality you want, then you could skip Encore entirely.

            • 4. Re: How to create a file that is widely playable and doesn't require re-encoding in Encore?
              Jim_Simon Level 8

              you could skip Encore entirely.

               

              I do that for my reviews.  Rather than authoring and burning, I just slap the MP4 onto a flash drive and plug that into the front of my Blu-ray.  Works great.

              • 5. Re: How to create a file that is widely playable and doesn't require re-encoding in Encore?
                Guy Burns Level 1

                joshweiland wrote:

                 

                Your Blu-ray player might support playing MP4 files, either on a disc or a USB thumb drive.  I'd try exporting one straight from Premiere and see what happens.  For multiple files, you may need to rename them so they play back in the order you'd like.

                 

                If your Blu-ray player is compatible with this, and this still provides the functionality you want, then you could skip Encore entirely.

                 

                Yes, I'd like to skip Encore. My player, an Oppo, seems to play almost everything I give it. Superb that way. But what no player/projector combination seems to be able to do, is to play files without a gap. I can save a series of short clips in almost any format to a USB stick and the Oppo will play them, but at the end of each clip the projector wants to resync, which takes several seconds. Meanwhile, the Oppo keeps on playing. So as well as the screen going black and a "Sync searching" message appearing, you miss the start of the next clip. Something to do with handshaking between player and projector, I guess.

                 

                I've tried driving the projector from my iMac. Works beautifully. First time I tried it I connected the cable, turned on the iMac and projector, and I couldn't believe it – within a few seconds the iMac image was being projected on the screen. No setup, no nothing. It just worked. And there's no syncing problem. But, I have been unable to find any software that can seamlessly play a series of clips without something interfering. VLC comes very close. But it displays the name of each clip for five seconds at the start of play. And I can't turn it off.

                 

                Another problem, my iMac (a 2011 model running at many GHz), no matter what the software used, can't scale-up as well as the Oppo (DVDs, for instance, are obviously superior through the Oppo than from the iMac), and for fast moving sequences, the iMac drops frames. I suspect any computer would when the video is H.264 running near full speed. I've never seen my two Blu-ray players drop frames.

                 

                And of course, having a computer in the room is really a no-no. I want to mimic as closely as I can a cinema experience from the 1950s. The lights dim, the before-interval section comes on and plays seamlessly (cigarette commercials, Movietone newsreels, cartoons), then interval, during which the cigarette girl in a short-skirt comes around ("Ice cream? Cigarettes?" – the lolly kind nowadays). I've yet to find the cigarette girl – though "J" is coming around to the idea.

                 

                Mimicking a cinema experience at home is quite a challenge. And it's not helped by the restrictions put in place by Premiere and Encore.

                • 6. Re: How to create a file that is widely playable and doesn't require re-encoding in Encore?
                  Jim_Simon Level 8

                  at the end of each clip the projector wants to resync, which takes several seconds.

                   

                  I see the same thing with my cousin's new 1080p 3D projector, even coming from a Blu-ray disk.  Never happened with his older 720p projector.

                   


                  Mimicking a cinema experience at home is quite a challenge. And it's not helped by the restrictions put in place by Premiere and Encore.

                   

                  Nor all the crap we get on most any commercial Blu-ray, like warnings, notices and menus.