7 Replies Latest reply on Aug 9, 2013 9:05 AM by station_two

    Photoshop Print Preview Bug

    Rick Meikle Level 1

      The print preview in Photoshop CC and CS6 is seriously flawed, though that may not be apparent if you are working in sRGB at 6500K and a 2.2 gamma, which most people use by default. In my case, using "old school" print settings (Adobe RGB at 5000K and a 1.8 gamma), print preview is now considerably darkened and blue shifted. This problem is virtually identical, to my eye, to a known bug with Acrobat Pro (and Reader) in which the user's display profile is ignored.

       

      Fortunately, files print correctly despite the flawed preview, which is what you would expect if the display profile is being ignored. A recent attempt by Adobe to fix the bug in Acrobat Pro was only partially successful for users of the most current version. The problem is still being investigated, according to the Adobe staff participating in the Acrobat forum.

       

      I don't print much anymore--relying instead on soft proofing--and rarely from Photoshop, so I just discovered the print preview problem now in Photoshop CC. Of note is that the last time I printed from Photoshop CS6, which was at least several months ago, the preview was fine. But CS6 now exhibits the same problem. All of this suggests to me the possibility of a more fundamental color display error than just a Photoshop or Acrobat bug. (I wonder if it might even lead to Apple.)

       

      My setup: MacPro running OS X 10.8.4, NEC SpectraView PA271W (includes calibrator), North American Prepress 2 workflow (synced across CC and CS6). In print settings, Photoshop is set to manage color using Canon MX870 profile for GL2 (glossy) paper. Of note is that in any combination of color management and print settings, the print preview is darkened and color shifted (in slightly different ways per whatever settings are in effect). I have not tried recalibrating the display for 6500K and 2.2 gamma, which would presumably "fix" the problem (more accurately, not reveal it), but that would undermine the print workflow.

        • 1. Re: Photoshop Print Preview Bug
          Level 5

          Even for the Mac, the ancient gamma 1.8 has been obsolete for many years.  It stems from the day of LaserWriters and has nothing to do with modern printing.

           

          Gamma 2.2 has been adopted even by Apple for years.

           

          I don't have CC and never will, but I see no such problem in Photoshop 13.0.5 ("CS6") on my 65-lb Mac Pro1,1 running Lion 10.7.5.  I print on Epson and Noritsu units, using Epson, Pictorico, Fujifilm, and Fuji Crystal Archive pepers.

           

          My working space is ProPhoto RGB, which incidentally is gamma 1.8, and my dual high-end CRT monitors are calibrated to gamma 2.2.  I calibrate them regularly and often, and I revalidate the calibration more than once a week, for added reassurance given the age of my monitors.

           

          The Adobe RGB standard color space is gamma 2.2.

           

          Can you post a screen shot of your print preview dialog box with one of your typical images showing inthe color managed preview?

          • 2. Re: Photoshop Print Preview Bug
            Rick Meikle Level 1

            Sorry, I wasn't posting a question. The 1.8 gamma is not obsolete. It produces a better soft proof for offset printing than 2.2. I know a lot of people have started using that along with the 6500K temp, but in my real world comparisons it simply doesn't get it done. However, this topic is not about what you think I should be using. It's about an easily reproduced flaw in the software.

            • 3. Re: Photoshop Print Preview Bug
              Level 5

              I cannot reproduce your issue with what you have described, sorry.

               

               

              I'm out of here.

              • 4. Re: Photoshop Print Preview Bug
                Rick Meikle Level 1

                That is because you are working at a 2.2 gamma on your displays (and 6500K color temp, which you did not mention). The Adobe staff in the Acrobat forum was able to reproduce it once they moved away from those settings. Several users in that forum have also reported the problem. It may be because Acrobat is used for prepress work, while Photoshop is not so much (probably more for printing photos, as you described in your first response).

                • 5. Re: Photoshop Print Preview Bug
                  Level 5

                  Thank you for the hint about the Acrobat forum.  I checked the thread where you posted, and it seems that Mountain Lion is needed to trigger the bug in Acrobat.  OS X 10.8.x won't even run on my machine, so in my situation the gamma chosen in the calibration is irrelevant to my not being able to reproduce the bug.

                   

                  You are also correct in pointing out that I don't deal with prepress directly myself.

                   

                  In other words, I shouldn't have commented at all. 

                  • 6. Re: Photoshop Print Preview Bug
                    Rick Meikle Level 1

                    I apologize if my replies were terse. I didn't want to see this topic chase a wild goose, but I do appreciate your willingness to check it out. Not sure that the problem is limited to Mountain Lion. It may be that part of the color management solution that Adobe worked years to implement was broken in the move from carbon to cocoa. And it may well involve what Apple is doing too. Whatever it is, it has resisted Adobe's efforts to solve it, whether because of technical/coding issues or a scarcity of finite corporate resources (which may amount to the same thing). With the gradual demise of print, the sRGB/6500K/2.2 gamma settings have become a de facto standard to the point that even Adobe has apparently overlooked the traditional print standard in their development and testing.

                    • 7. Re: Photoshop Print Preview Bug
                      Level 5

                      Apology cheerfully accepted and hereby reciprocated.