7 Replies Latest reply on Aug 15, 2013 9:17 PM by Steven L. Gotz

    Taking 100fps footage down to 24 or 30

    phorlings

      Sorry if this is an obvious question here - I'm learning! Using Premiere Pro CC on an iMac i7 16 gigs of ram

       

      So, I am receiving footage to be edited into a 60-90 second spot. They are going to want some time remapping effects so they ended up shooting the ENTIRE thing at 100 fps.

       

      Now for this project only select clips will end up even needing to be slowed down, ramped, etc.


      For shots where I don't require the 100 fps, if I set up my project and sequence at either 24 or 30, will I be able to drop cuts into my sequence and have it be normal? or will I need to do some sort of massive duplication and conversion up front.


      Thank you SO MUCH in advance!

        • 1. Re: Taking 100fps footage down to 24 or 30
          Jim_Simon Level 8

          I'd recommend shooting at 24 or 30 for full speed shots, and only shooting at 100 for the slow motion shots.

          • 2. Re: Taking 100fps footage down to 24 or 30
            phorlings Level 1

            Yeah I would have thought this as well - unfortunately they already filmed this way and this is how I am getting all the footage. Any advice?

            • 3. Re: Taking 100fps footage down to 24 or 30
              Jim_Simon Level 8

              Reshoot.  The only point of 100 fps is slow motion.  You just don't shoot that for normal speed playback.

              • 4. Re: Taking 100fps footage down to 24 or 30
                phorlings Level 1

                Yikes! Thanks for your help Jim. I don't think a reshoot will be possible - what are my options for fixing this footage the best I can? I do have after effects

                • 5. Re: Taking 100fps footage down to 24 or 30
                  Jim_Simon Level 8

                  Well, drop it into the sequence and see how it looks.  My suspicion is not nearly as good as if it were shot at the correct frame rate.

                  • 6. Re: Taking 100fps footage down to 24 or 30
                    strypesinpost Level 2

                    What camera are you shooting with? If it's the RED cameras, the operator will usually shoot let's say 120fps and set the playback frame rate to 23.976 for slow motion playback, so when you import the clips into Premiere, it will automatically playback at 23.976fps.

                     

                    Once I had 50fps clips and I needed an option to edit in real time in 25fps. For that, I can simply interpret the clips to playback at 50fps and edit in a 25p sequence. As 50fps is exactly twice the fps of 25, the conversion is pretty straightforward, and there aren't any interpolated frames.

                     

                    In your case, you would set the frame rate to 120fps (if they shot 120fps), and Premiere should be able to do the frame rate conversion without interpolating frames. But the thing is whether 120fps is exactly 120fps, because in the NTSC world, you have 60Hz and you have 59.94Hz... 120fps will convert to 24p quite easily by dropping one out of every 5 frames, and you can slow that down to 23.976 after the edit and add a pulldown to go up to 29.976fps. That or you can edit in a straight 30fps and conform it down to 29.97fps.

                     

                    That said motion quality may look a bit awkward, due to the different shutter speed required for shooting 24p and 120fps.

                    • 7. Re: Taking 100fps footage down to 24 or 30
                      Steven L. Gotz Level 5

                      I don't have any 100fps footage, but I often shoot at 60fps and put it into 29.97 sequences. All Premiere Pro does is skip frames. If you shoot at 100fps with a shutter speed of twice that, it will look about the same as it would have had you shot 29.97fps at that same shutter speed. Most people use a shutter speed of 1/50 or 1/60 if available on the camera when shooting 25fps or 29.97fps. But if you shot at 1/200 how would it look?

                       

                      So, does it matter if your shutter speed is higher than normal? That depends on what you are shooting and what looks good to you.

                       

                      As Jim said, drop it on a sequence and see what happens.