12 Replies Latest reply on Nov 10, 2016 10:46 AM by FlyingSquad

    OpenEXR import question

    Adrtghhjj

      I've read all over the net that EXR is the choice format for professional-grade images (and used by editors at Hollywood).

      Neither PPro nor Media Composer (which I thought was the standard in editing) allow me to import EXR's. Not even Lightroom can view them.

       

      So my question is: if it is so used, how do these people get EXR images into an editing application and export them to finished product?

        • 1. Re: OpenEXR import question
          Fuzzy Barsik Level 4

          In Adobe Suite - via ProEXR plug-in by fnord.

          (EXtractoR, IDentifier and OpenEXR plug-ings by fnord are shipped with After Effects)

          • 2. Re: OpenEXR import question
            Adrtghhjj Level 1

            Fuzzy Barsik wrote:

             

            In Adobe Suite - via ProEXR plug-in by fnord.

            (EXtractoR, IDentifier and OpenEXR plug-ings by fnord are shipped with After Effects)

            So everybody involved in pro editing has to use this plug-in? No native workflows? (If there *is* a way to deal with EXR without the plugin, please elaborate).

             

            Thanks.

            • 3. Re: OpenEXR import question
              Fuzzy Barsik Level 4

              Not sure what is unclear and needs further elaboration. Not everybody involved in pro editing ever deals with OpenEXR, which is primarily used in 3D and compositing. Plug-ins shipped with AE provide moderate functionality for dealing with OpenEXR files, even layered ones. For advanced functionality in AE and basic support in PrPro you need ProEXR. Check the link above, find and read ProEXR manual for more details.

              • 4. Re: OpenEXR import question
                Adrtghhjj Level 1

                Fuzzy Barsik wrote:

                 

                Not everybody involved in pro editing ever deals with OpenEXR, which is primarily used in 3D and compositing.

                Well, I've read on the net the phrase "EXR, the JPEG of Hollywood". That led me to think it was ubiquitous and absolutely required in any serious production. Else, it said "quality loss" would occur, especially after the grading stage.

                I have another (related) question: what would be a good, professionally-used, image format (non-EXR) to import in PrPro, optimal in resisting the above-mentioned "quality loss" after grading?

                • 5. Re: OpenEXR import question
                  Fuzzy Barsik Level 4
                  it said "quality loss" would occur, especially after the grading stage.

                  Start with these The Video Road blogposts:

                  - Understanding Color Processing: 8-bit, 10-bit, 32-bit, and more;

                  - What is YUV?

                  - Color Subsampling, or What is 4:4:4 or 4:2:2??

                  what would be a good, professionally-used, image format (non-EXR) to import in PrPro, optimal in resisting the above-mentioned "quality loss" after grading?

                  There is a load of production codecs, even codecs families, which serve different purposes in a production workflow, - from image based like DPX, TGA, TIFF, PNG to video based like ProRes, DNxHD, UT Video, Lagarith, CineForm etc.

                   

                  Choosing a codec for either digital intermediate or even proxy is a matter of finding optimal 'quality / file size / render time' ratio, in which the latter component depends on a spec (machine config).

                   

                  For monitoring mathematical quality loss I use the following technique: set my project in After Effects to 32-bit, linearise working space, drop a source file and a transcoded one into the same composition and set blending mode to 'Difference'. The closer the result to a pure black solid, the lesser mathematical shift in pixels values. However, such precision is not always required, and 'visually lossless' result is acceptable in many cases.

                   

                  In real life you may even not be allowed to make a choise and simply have to comply with the requirements / established workflow.

                  • 6. Re: OpenEXR import question
                    Jim_Simon Level 8

                    That led me to think it was ubiquitous and absolutely required in any serious production.

                     

                    Hardly.  I'd wager a very small percentage of PP users even know what EXR is, let alone use it in their daily work flow.

                     

                    I think the litmus on this one is, if you need to ask how to use it, you don't really need it.

                    • 7. Re: OpenEXR import question
                      fnordware Level 3

                      Adrtghhjj wrote:

                       

                       

                      Well, I've read on the net the phrase "EXR, the JPEG of Hollywood". That led me to think it was ubiquitous and absolutely required in any serious production. Else, it said "quality loss" would occur, especially after the grading stage.

                      I have another (related) question: what would be a good, professionally-used, image format (non-EXR) to import in PrPro, optimal in resisting the above-mentioned "quality loss" after grading?

                       

                      "The JPEG of Hollywood" is probably a fair statement, but remember that JPEG is a still image format. Premiere is primarily designed for movie formats, with modest support for image sequences.

                       

                      OpenEXR is mostly used for visual effects, not editorial. Most VFX studios are handed frames, not movies.

                       

                      At some point in the process, someone has to decide how to convert from the shooting format to a lossless image sequence format. ProEXR for Premiere could be used for that, along with many other tools.

                       

                      I wrote ProEXR for Premiere not so much because there was demand for it, but because I figured I'd add the capability and see what happened. Different people are using it for a variety of reasons. One guy is sending EXRs back and forth to Resolve because they're smaller and faster than DPX. One VFX studio has an EXR workflow and wants their VFX editors to grab the sources without conversion to a movie format.

                       

                      If you're considering fitting it into a workflow, let me know.

                      • 8. Re: OpenEXR import question
                        FlyingSquad

                        Hey, I want to export frames from Premier Pro CC and then import into Photoshop to enhance the image which is CCTV. In previous versions my choice was jpeg or bmp - does anyone have any suggestions as to the use of DPX or OpenEXR?

                        • 9. Re: OpenEXR import question
                          chrisw44157881 Level 4

                          according to RED(the camera makers) holding RAW in a DPX LOG requires at least a 12 bit container. EXR can export float at 32bits which is a newer, more capable container with way more features

                           

                          >Besides the fact that you don't have to convert from log to linear to log to linear to log to linear(oops!) got lost, which conversion again!!

                          • 10. Re: OpenEXR import question
                            FlyingSquad Level 1

                            Thank you, that makes sense - I use Red cameras and ARRI too. Appreciate your comment, I am just doing a bit of research to these new formats and want to make sure they will not affect my enhancement through lack of knowledge!!!

                            • 11. Re: OpenEXR import question
                              fnordware Level 3

                              FlyingSquad wrote:

                               

                              Hey, I want to export frames from Premier Pro CC and then import into Photoshop to enhance the image which is CCTV. In previous versions my choice was jpeg or bmp - does anyone have any suggestions as to the use of DPX or OpenEXR?

                               

                              CCTV, as in closed-circuit television? I assume it's an H.264 MP4 or something.

                               

                              The source is probably 8-bit, so you don't really gain anything by exporting to a HDR format like OpenEXR. PNG or DPX will be fine, I'd think.

                              • 12. Re: OpenEXR import question
                                FlyingSquad Level 1

                                Yes, closed circuit television but NOT in its native format SADLY. Converted to a mov via a lossless conversion bit of kit, imported into Premier to edit, from premier I exported stills but have the DPX and EXR files I have not used before. I could, however, go back to my original conversion software and export stills that way to a bmp or jpeg. I was just keen to know more about the DPX and EXR files.