3 Replies Latest reply on Sep 22, 2013 6:16 PM by denez mcadoo

    Is my footage interlaced and what do I do about it?

    denez mcadoo Level 1

      Sorry for the kinda newbie question, but I don't deal with interlaced footage too much these days.

       

      So I've been editing footage from various sources that come in all sorts of formates. I have no way of contacting the people that shot it, not an option. I'll use my current project as an example.

       

      In this case, the footage is comming from a playable DVD, so perhaps the first question is - does this make it interlaced? From what I've read online, people seem to say that programs like MediaInfo and GSpot will not tell me if the footage is interlaced or not. I don't see why not, but I also don't see a section in these programs that say interlaced or progressive (GSpot does have a blank "Fields/s" but in this case it is blank).

       

      When I drop my footage into Premiere, it auto formates the timeline as progressive. Is this correct? I don't know, but I can tell you the footage definatly looks interlaced. Then again, perhaps I'm being confused by visable artifacts because it is very low resolution footage (320x240, never seen that before). I tried dropping the footage into two different time lines, settings the same except one is interlaced, one progressive. The footage looks virtually the same in both (suggesting that the footage is progressive, perhaps?) 

       

      Like I said, info on the net seems to point to "use your eyes" as the solution, but this brings up two issues. How do I know if the footage is actually interlaced, or if the interlaced look was "baked" into a progressive frame at some earlier point (perhaps when converted to DVD). Second, if the footage is interlaced, how can I possibly tell if it is upperfield domint or lowerfield dominant by just "using my eyes"?

        • 1. Re: Is my footage interlaced and what do I do about it?
          Ann Bens Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          Run the file through Mediainfo (treeview)

          It will give you all kind of informatie including what fields are used.

          http://mediainfo.sourceforge.net/en

          • 2. Re: Is my footage interlaced and what do I do about it?
            joe bloe premiere Level 5

            ...the footage is comming from a playable DVD,

            so perhaps the first question is - does this make it interlaced?

            If the media was properly formatted for DVD playback, yes.

            MediaInfo and GSpot will not tell me if the footage

            is interlaced or not.

            I don't see why not, but I also don't see a section

            in these programs that say interlaced or progressive

            You can import the file into Premiere, select it in the Project Panel,

            then check the 'File Info' Panel, or use GSpot.

            In Premiere, LFF indicates 'lower field first'.

            In GSpot, I/L indicates interlaced - lower.

            Interlaced.png

            (GSpot does have a blank "Fields/s" but in this case it is blank).

            That means 'fields per second'.

            A blank "Fields/s" field in GSpot indicates progressive scan.

            When I drop my footage into Premiere, it auto

            formates the timeline as progressive. Is this correct?

            Yes, if the media is progressive.

            If the media is interlaced, the Sequence will be interlaced as well:

            Sequence.PNG

            ...it is very low resolution footage (320x240, never seen that before).

            Properly formatted media for DVD should be 720x480 (NTSC).

            How do I know if the footage is actually interlaced, or if the interlaced look was "baked" into a progressive frame at some earlier point

            That is possible, as you do not actually have a DVD formatted file.

            • 3. Re: Is my footage interlaced and what do I do about it?
              denez mcadoo Level 1

              thanks joe, you are absolutly correct. I tried some other footage from another DVD, which looks to be PAL and GSpot identifies 25 Frames/s, 50 Fields/s, and as you pointed out, in green underneith, I/L, indicating Interlaced Lower Field dominance.