10 Replies Latest reply on Oct 22, 2013 9:40 AM by laurel2013

    Exporting video sees jerkiness, has this issue been fixed ?

    Envirographics Level 1

      Hi,

      Flash CS5

      Many months ago I had need to export the animation as a video file, tried both avi and mov, only to see the smooth movement in flash test movie become jerky in the exported video file. Others on the forums had also experienced this and I tried the various suggestions they had tried, but nothing worked. The most promising seemed to be a program that created a still frame from each flash frame, but no joy.

       

      I even tried camtasia screen capture, for if it looked smooth in flash test movie, why not capture that this way. Amazingly it also still ran jerky.

       

      I have plan views of cars and they travel across screen but with the occasional jerk in their motion, as opposed to jerky throughout, two or three per car.

       

      fps is 60, we found the action in test movie was jerky with the 25fps or even 12fps, and it got better the more fps we used.

       

      I just wonder, as I need to provide a non jerky video file to the client, what to try now ?

       

      Has Adobe fixed the issue ?

       

      Would running this through Pro CC solve it, has Pro fixed the video export jerks issue,  though we cannot go using a prog that makes use of the network to create things as the network here is hopelessly slow. It would have to write it locally to the HD.

       

      Envirographics

        • 1. Re: Exporting video sees jerkiness, has this issue been fixed ?
          sinious Most Valuable Participant

          Long story short, sometimes what you perceive as jerky is just movement that's too fast for a slow frame rate and it's unavoidably noticable to human eyes.

           

          There's a formula to the speed at which you can pan a movie camera before you'll undoubtedly encounter "studder" in the video. You can have the best equipment in the world and only frame blending techniques can really work out things like that.

           

          What I'm getting at is if what is moving is very fast and you have a low frame rate it will always look studdery. Each time a frame is captured the object is a lot farther from the previous frame. As you lower your frame rate (below 45fps) your eyes begin to perceive this and understand they're basically watching a fake slideshow. There were actually movies that used to be filmed at over 40FPS (The Hobbit being one recent one) but because the motion was so true to life your brain started to perceive it as real. Some people threw up in the isles of the movie theaters and the films and cinemas were too expensive, so it died out.

           

          In your case there's just a chance your subject is moving too fast to use a low frame rate. 60 is fast enough to fool your eyes into seeing smooth motion. I have 60FPS MP4s I play on iOS devices and the same video with slower moving visuals at 30FPS for android devices on the same app (most Androids suffer playing above 40FPS with a HD video). There is a very noticable difference between the two.

           

          I have a very modern tricked out overclocked system and a pretty well equipped lesser system side by side. The tricked out system can play back 60FPS MP4 video but dies trying to play it using an efficient uncompressed codec (sheer video or animation lossless MOV). Mostly due to not having SSDs in RAID0 so you can barely expect a 80GB file to play great. The lesser system struggles greatly to even play back the 60FPS MP4, with a hardware decoder on the GPU. 60FPS at high resolution is pretty tough overall in high motion, high bandwidth.

           

          After you export from Flash, preferably at double the framerate you're interested in targeting, you should be able to reduce it by half and let frame blending smooth out some of the jerkiness. Having twice the frames to choose from will greatly help the blending in quality apps like Premiere, After Effects, Sorenson Squeeze, etc.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Exporting video sees jerkiness, has this issue been fixed ?
            SujaiS Adobe Employee

            There has been many improvements in the Export video feature in CC which uses Adobe Media Encoder for the export.

             

            More details on: http://helpx.adobe.com/flash/using/exporting.html#id_83354

             

            Would recommend you to try this out.

             

             

            -Sujai

            1 person found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Exporting video sees jerkiness, has this issue been fixed ?
              Envirographics Level 1

              Sinious...

              Thanks for the reply.

               

              sometimes what you perceive as jerky is just movement that's too fast for a slow frame rate and it's unavoidably noticable to human eyes

              Cars travel across the animation which fills a 1024pixel width screen taking 1.66 secs to do so. Its not a fast motion in my book. Would what you refer to see a jerkiness throughout the entire left to right same speed motion of the car or would it account for what we see, just two or three jerks during an otherwise acceptable smooth travel (see Note A) ?

               

              Why is the motion perfect in Flash, or certainly not showing these jerks in a noticeable way but then jerky upon export movie ?

              The swf plays fine when run from windows in Adobe Flash Player, but converted to avi or mov it then sees cars with two or three jerks during their travel.

               

              After you export from Flash, preferably at double the framerate you're interested in targeting, you should be able to reduce it by half and let frame blending smooth out some of the jerkiness. Having twice the frames to choose from will greatly help the blending in quality apps like Premiere

               

              I try 120fps as you suggest. I choose export quicktime mov and set frame rate to 120 but the system wont let me, saying the quicktime frame rate needs to match the flash document frame rate.

               

              I try for avi but see no option to even set the fps.

               

              How do I export as 120fps ?

               

              Sujai S

              Flash CC wont run on XP I see, and we have XP, and for many months yet.

               

              I am told try Prelude to remove the two or three jerks in motion but Prelude CC same OS issue, need win7 or 8.

               

              Prelude is OnLocation, I wonder if OnLocation would help, if I can find a trial of it. Unable to commit to buy without knowing. CS5 was ok with XP but was Prelude or OnLocation in CS5, I cant seem to find out.

               

              Note A: The motion in Flash cannot be termed perfect, watch the cars very carefully and they have a very slight stuttering throughout their entire travel. This was more noticeable at 12fps and 25fps and we settled on 60fps as best compromise between improving this and far too many frames per second to make the editing possible, timeline being miles long etc.

               

              Envirographics

              • 4. Re: Exporting video sees jerkiness, has this issue been fixed ?
                SujaiS Adobe Employee

                Yeah. Most CC apps are not available on XP. Flash Pro CC is a 64 bit native app and in order to take advantage of this you will need a 64 bit Operating System.

                 

                -Sujai

                1 person found this helpful
                • 5. Re: Exporting video sees jerkiness, has this issue been fixed ?
                  sinious Most Valuable Participant

                  Well XP has a 64bit version but it's missing several things like updated DirectX, IE, etc. Those probably are the real reason it's not supported (unless it is on XP SP3 64).

                   

                  When you say cars travel across, are these part of a background video embedded or are you animating cars across the screen with a tween? Please include more details about the objects that are jerky, what they are and how they're used/animated.

                  • 6. Re: Exporting video sees jerkiness, has this issue been fixed ?
                    Envirographics Level 1

                    Sinious.

                    The cars are imported to library png files moving across a static png road scene, all in plan view, using classic tweens. Each is a MovieClip, within which are MCs giving reflection (for wet day scenes), tyre spray, indicator lights, brake lights. Paths are straight or curved, using guide lines. Just a few cars per animation. Animation duration 14 secs. 43Mb fla file. 60fps, Also a cyclist pedaling (MCs within MC) and human (latter is vector and a load of shape tweens so he morphs from standup to lie down). Earlier on he is png (MCs in an MC) and walking.

                     

                    Hope that helps.

                     

                    Still wondering, on the suggestion of using Prelude, what is there in Prelude that will help remove the two or three jerks per vehicle ?

                     

                    Envirographics

                    • 7. Re: Exporting video sees jerkiness, has this issue been fixed ?
                      sinious Most Valuable Participant

                      To simplify it can you make a brand new document at 60fps at (I assume) HD size, 1920x1080, draw a curve for a guide, make a simple shape (rectangle, circle, etc) and animate it going from one side of the screen to the other over the time you mentioned, around 1.6 seconds, so about 96 frames. Export that and see if it's smooth.

                       

                      Here's a nice ugly yellow stroke around red rounded rectangle following a curved path over 1.6 seconds at 60FPS to compare to your results, see if there's any difference:

                       

                      Original (Animation) MOV

                      60FPS MP4

                      30FPS MP4

                       

                      60fps.jpg

                      • 8. Re: Exporting video sees jerkiness, has this issue been fixed ?
                        laurel2013 Level 1

                        Hello,

                        I'm having a similar problem - can anyone help?  I'm creating an animation of a planet orbiting the sun and it is stuttering no matter what I try.  I'm working in Flash CC, the animation is done with a custom ease and only 2 keyframes (one at the slowest point and one at the fastest).  The end result has to be .mp4 so I am exporting as video.  But even the swf is a little jerky.  My frame rate is 29.97.  The animation path is oval in shape (using an oval guide path which the planet follows), the planet is small, maybe 6 mm across,  and the planet's speed varies as it orbits the sun (thus the custom ease).

                         

                        thanks in advance for help!

                        • 9. Re: Exporting video sees jerkiness, has this issue been fixed ?
                          sinious Most Valuable Participant

                          You'll get a better response opening a new thread. In there you should detail out exactly how long you're animating the object and be specific about what you mean by 'jerky'. Pictures (even mockups) help a lot. Chances are you're just falling into the category my first response detailed, moving too fast over too short of a duration for the frame rate used.

                          • 10. Re: Exporting video sees jerkiness, has this issue been fixed ?
                            laurel2013 Level 1

                            Thanks sinious, I do have a new thread, it is titled

                            Need help with jerky animation in Flash CC

                            I will add a few more details and a mockup to that post now in hopes that gets me some specific feedback.  The number of frames in the animation is 102, that's how long it takes for the planet to complete one rotation.  That anim is then looped in the movie as a graphic, because it has to stop and resume at specific points as the movie progresses.