2 Replies Latest reply on Sep 26, 2013 7:25 PM by Bill Gehrke

    SSD RAID 0 or as a C: & D:?

    glasswave Level 1

      Curently, I have an i7 3930 six core, 32gb, gtx 560ti (driving 2 dell 2713h's), 256gb Samsung 830 system at home.

       

      One of my clients (identical machine) is upgrading to a 512GB 840 pro and gifting me an identical 256gb Samsung 830!! Hooray!!

       

      My main apps are pShop/lightroom (usually basic pp on 18mp RAWS w/ocassional panos), 3ds Max/Maya/Mudbox, w/ some Premiere Pro, AE, ilustrator/corel draw and web design utils. So far, I only need about 100 GB for progs, swaps and cache. Most of my video rendering is done at work, but I have been offered some sponsorships and as such might soon be doing more video (dslr & POV cam) at home.

       

      I keep regualr back ups of my system build and data.  I am looking into building a 3 drive 9GB  raid 3  Seagate Baracuda 7200rpm array on a 6GB/sec eSata for data if I start doing lot's of video editing at home.

       

      I am tempted to install the ssd's in a RAID 0 c: drive, but have heard that there may be little real world difference for most of my work (ie: boot times and prog launches don't speed up that much). So would I be better off just installing the second ssd as a D: drive and using it  for photos I am working on and other current project data? or should I build the ssd's into a raid 0 array?

        • 1. Re: SSD RAID 0 or as a C: & D:?
          JEShort01 Level 4

          Sweet - the 830's rock, I have a few! They perform closer to the 840 pro than the 840 models.

           

          There is a LOT of disagreement regarding using a RAID 0 OS/boot drive configuration, and mostly it is various users preaching NEVER, NEVER do this.

           

          I have personally used RAID 0 for my "main" personal workstations for more than 10 years. In the early years I had 10k SCSI drives, then 10k Raptors, and for the past few years I have been using a SSD RAID 0. Like you I do regular backups. For my boot array I do image backups, not data backups (I use ShadowProtect and love it). I never lost any data by the way.

           

          Now, from what I just said you might expect me to suggest you go for the dual 830 RAID 0, but I am not. Well not exactly. If you stick with your motherboard controller I would suggest not doing a RAID 0 on the SSDs. SSDs are so fast and today's Intel and Marvell controllers are not getting 100% approval ratings in the reliability department for RAID 0 builds. If however you were to add a workstation class RAID card however, I would say go for it.

           

          I will suggest that you "treat" your STRONG PC build with an Areca controller. They are expensive, but awesome. If you add a ARC-1882i for example, you would have 4 internal channels and 4 external channels:

          - RAID 0 the SSDs

          - use the external SFF-8088 connector to go to a Sans Digital TowerRAID box as your external RAID; this way you are not having to pipe the collective RAID through a single SATA channel and using a slower external RAID appliance controller for the RAID 5

           

          A few years ago, and considering the high cost for SSDs at that time, I went with a 5x RAID 0 boot array with low cost Crucial 64GB SSDs (330MB/s read, 65 MB/s write). When you Adobe Bridge's cache files on this array it is simply scorching performance for photo browsing or work. This same array does very little for Premiere Pro; the write speeds are not very good and it is not a very large array. Again I repeat, it is awesome for photo work, and you mention that is your focus here. Having Photoshop load in under 2 seconds is nice too!

           

          Regards,

           

          Jim

          • 2. Re: SSD RAID 0 or as a C: & D:?
            Bill Gehrke Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            All three systems that I have recently built have the fastest drive for the project files.  Having a RAID array for the Boot/Applications does not help performance on editing with Premiere.  A single SSD Boot drive is great for starting up Windows but does nothing for Premiere performance.