15 Replies Latest reply on Sep 28, 2013 5:02 AM by Fuzzy Barsik

    How to export using DNxHD

    Adrtghhjj Level 1

      I've seen many recommendations to use DNxHD for editing purposes.

      However, being new to PrPro, I don't know how to export to DNxHD. In the Export Settings window, what option(s) should I choose from the Format drop-down list?

        • 1. Re: How to export using DNxHD
          Jax24135 Level 3

          DNxHD is an AVID codec for handling HD footage.

           

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DNxHD

           

          There's no point in converting your footage to DNxHD unless you're outsourcing the proejct. Just edit your footage in the native format.

          • 2. Re: How to export using DNxHD
            Adrtghhjj Level 1

            Jax24135 wrote:

             

            There's no point in converting your footage to DNxHD unless you're outsourcing the proejct.

            So if I needed to outsource it what option do I choose from the Format list?

            • 3. Re: How to export using DNxHD
              Jax24135 Level 3

              Why do you have to choose an option in the format list? If they're just going to be editing, send them the original footage/tape/media.

               

              Any option in the export window will downgrade your footage somewhat. It's meant for choosing formats for outlets (BluRay,DVD,YouTube).

              • 4. Re: How to export using DNxHD
                Adrtghhjj Level 1

                Jax24135 wrote:

                 

                Why do you have to choose an option in the format list? If they're just going to be editing, send them the original footage/tape/media.

                Well, because from what I read on the subject on the net, I copied these quotes from various sources:

                 

                "For a feature film you would first export to a Digital Master for long term storage.

                Popular Digital Intermediates these days are

                    AVID DNxHD

                    Apple ProRes4444 (Mac only)"

                 

                "There is a load of production codecs, which serve different purposes in a production workflow, - from image based like DPX, TGA, TIFF, PNG to video based like ProRes, DNxHD, UT Video, Lagarith, CineForm etc."

                 

                "What is generally used for the editing stage? The most common are DNxHD and ProRes."

                • 5. Re: How to export using DNxHD
                  Jim_Simon Level 8

                  That last part needs to be qualified.  It may well be true when using Avid Media Composer or Final Cut Pro, but for Premiere Pro, the most common format used for editing is the original media.  PP has always been better at doing that than those other NLEs.  A lot of folks seem to be stuck in the 'conversion' mindset when they move over to PP, but it generally isn't necessary, and more often than not will gain you nothing, but still cost you time and storage space.

                  • 6. Re: How to export using DNxHD
                    Adrtghhjj Level 1

                    Jim Simon wrote:

                     

                    (...) for Premiere Pro, the most common format used for editing is the original media.

                    What is "native format"/"original media" in the case of a 3D software like Max or Maya, which usually produce image sequences, not videos? Are they usually imported native (as image sequences), too?

                    I'm asking because on this forum I've read that: "Premiere is primarily designed for movie formats, with modest support for image sequences".

                    • 7. Re: How to export using DNxHD
                      Fuzzy Barsik Level 4
                      What is "native format"/"original media" in the case of a 3D software like Max or Maya, which usually produce image sequences, not videos? Are they usually imported native (as image sequences), too?

                      Yes. But those renders are rather imported into a compositing application first.

                      I'm asking because on this forum I've read that: "Premiere is primarily designed for movie formats, with modest support for image sequences".

                      Why don't just run your own tests instead?

                      • 8. Re: How to export using DNxHD
                        Steven L. Gotz Level 5

                        Image sequences work just fine.

                         

                        Now, there are issues if the images are huge, right out of a DSLR for example, and you want to edit them in a 1920X1080 sequence. In that case use a Photoshop action to scale them down first (scale copies not the originals of course), before importing into Premiere Pro.

                         

                        Other than that, image sequences are not a problem.

                        • 9. Re: How to export using DNxHD
                          Jim_Simon Level 8

                          "Premiere is primarily designed for movie formats, with modest support for image sequences".

                           

                          I wouldn't agree with that statement either.  Premiere Pro has long worked with image sequences, including Hollywood standards like DPX.

                          • 10. Re: How to export using DNxHD
                            Adrtghhjj Level 1

                            Steven L. Gotz wrote:

                             

                            Now, there are issues if the images are huge, right out of a DSLR for example, and you want to edit them in a 1920X1080 sequence. In that case use a Photoshop action to scale them down first (scale copies not the originals of course), before importing into Premiere Pro.

                            I understand, but what if the final movie needs to be 1920X1080? When I export it, wouldn't I end up with a movie that has a lesser resolution?

                            • 11. Re: How to export using DNxHD
                              Steven L. Gotz Level 5

                              No.

                               

                              If you import images that you have scaled down in Photoshop to 1920X1080 into a Premiere Pro project, then put them on a 1920X1080 sequence, then export them at 1920X1080, they will look fine.

                               

                              You could also scale them to something larger if you want to pan around a bit. But there is no point in straining Premiere Pro by putting an image sequence made up of 36MP images into a 1920X1080 timeline.

                              • 12. Re: How to export using DNxHD
                                Adrtghhjj Level 1

                                Steven L. Gotz wrote:

                                 

                                If you import images that you have scaled down in Photoshop to 1920X1080 into a Premiere Pro project, then put them on a 1920X1080 sequence, then export them at 1920X1080, they will look fine.

                                But what if I have 4K images and would need a 4K final movie; wouldn't scaling them down and importing those images yield a 1920X1080 movie?

                                • 13. Re: How to export using DNxHD
                                  Fuzzy Barsik Level 4

                                  If you're working on a 4K project and facing timeline playback issues, which are not resolved via decreasing Playback Resolution, you normally go through proxy route for motion check.

                                  • 14. Re: How to export using DNxHD
                                    Adrtghhjj Level 1

                                    Fuzzy Barsik wrote:

                                     

                                    If you're working on a 4K project and facing timeline playback issues, which are not resolved via decreasing Playback Resolution, you normally go through proxy route for motion check.

                                    1) So decreasing Playback Resolution is a good way for speeding up playback? Where is this option?

                                    2) What is the "proxy route"? I don't know anything about that.

                                    3) What is "motion check"?

                                     

                                    And thanks for the answers.

                                    • 15. Re: How to export using DNxHD
                                      Fuzzy Barsik Level 4

                                      1. You need to familiarise yourself with the interface. See e.g. this help section.

                                       

                                      2. Proxy is usually a lower resolution or a lower bitrate footage, with which you temporarily substitute a source footage. Speaking in general terms, PrPro creates proxies under the hood when and editor chooses to render a timeline preview.

                                       

                                      Currently PrPro has some flaws in proxies workflow (e.g. it's impossible to relink a video file to an image sequence). Unlike PrPro, After Effects has a nice Placeholders and Proxies workflow, and some time ago I even posted a feature request proposal to introduce similar workflow in PrPro. Fortunately Adobe seems realised that proxy workflow doesn't harm native editing and is about to introduce some enhancement in the upcoming October release.

                                       

                                      3. Motion check is a check on your story telling (whether you cut your timeline properly, whether motion graphics elements are animated properly etc.), within which details precision is not crucial.