4 Replies Latest reply on Oct 5, 2013 11:58 AM by Markpic

    Burning DVD's

    gugnunc

      My avi.file is about 16gb. How can I burn it on to one 4.7gb DVD, or if not how can I burn it onto a succession of DVd's (say3)?

        • 1. Re: Burning DVD's
          John T Smith Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          The Tutorial Links Page http://forums.adobe.com/thread/1275830 has a link for Sharing to a DVD that may help

           

          Your AVI file will be compressed to MPEG/VOB to go on a DVD... I'm not sure if 16Gig will compress that far and still be above the minimum data rate

          • 2. Re: Burning DVD's
            A.T. Romano Level 7

            gugnunc

             

            What version of Premiere Elements are you using and on what computer operaing system is it running?

             

            Just what do you want to do?

             

            Burn an .avi file to a DVD disc as an .avi file?

             

            or

             

            Burn a Premiere Elements Timeline containing this .avi file to the format of DVD-VIDEO on DVD disc?

             

            For now, I will assume the latter.

             

            Preliminary test to get a baseline for strategy...

             

            1. If you can, import your .avi file into Premiere Elements project with project preset selected to match the properties of your source media.

             

            2. Place a DVD-R into the DVD burner tray.

             

            3. Go to the sharing area of your Premiere Elements, select ..../Disc/DVD disc, in the burn dialog, what does it say in the Quality Area for Space Required and Bitrate? Get those values for with and without a check mark next to the option "Fit Contents to Available Space".

             

            What type of DVD disc do you have?

            DVD 4.7 GB/120 minutes (in reality 4.7 = 4.38 GB)

            or

            DVD 8.5 GB/240 minutes (in reality 8.5 = 7.95 GB)

             

            Let us start here and then decide what next.

             

            Thanks.

             

            ATR

            • 3. Re: Burning DVD's
              the_wine_snob Level 9

              Along with the answers to the questions posed above, I have one more, please:

               

              What is the Duration of your Timeline?

               

              When one authors a DVD-Video, the Timeline is Encoded to MPEG-2 DVD, which is a compressed format. The resulting file(s) will be compressed to a smaller size. How much compression is needed, and even possible, will be shown by the Duration of that Timeline. From that information, others can recommend either a "quality setting," or perhaps suggest that you use a DVD-9 (8.5), in lieu of a DVD-5 (4.7) in very general terms - see ATR's Reply #2 for exact capacities.

               

              Good luck,

               

              Hunt

              • 4. Re: Burning DVD's
                Markpic Level 1

                DVD-video (as it is actually known)

                Can maintain high quality playback using mpeg-2 compression.

                The 4.7 GB blank disk can most times hold...just 4.1 GB's.

                When my camcorder was a DV-tape camcorder--I made 50-minute long video's to hold quality at its best.

                I would push that to 1-hour 10-minutes if absolutely necessary.

                At 1-hour 20-minutes...the video quality will be less.

                Your DV-avi File should be 13-GB's MAX.

                While 11.5 GB's is best.

                ===

                Next to consider is a Dual Layer DVD-blank.

                Which requires DL format playback machines.

                ===

                Blu-ray solves all of those problems.

                But also requires a Blu-ray playback machine.

                ===

                When using DV-tape...I just made 50-minute lenght projects.

                Adding multiple disk--projects.

                 

                Message was edited by: Markpic