4 Replies Latest reply on Oct 22, 2013 12:23 PM by naumen

    PSU power?

    naumen Level 1

      Hello

       

      some of u may find my question stupid , but i have to ask - i have chieftec 1000w PSU (APS-1000C) , and i d like to ask : does it mean that it eats 1000w all the time ? when i turn on PC it just starts eating 1000W non stop? or it eats only the necessary amount that is needed to power up mother board, CPU, GPU, hard drives? lets say if all i have installed on my PC in total need only 750w - will it eat just 750W or 1000w?

       

      electricity prices went up and our government told its going to be even higher since new year... so i am trying to figure out if i need to change my PSU to less powerful unit? they are not crazy expansive and 750w unit will save me much more on electricity bills, then the curent unit price.

       

      my system : I7 950, WIN 7 ultimate 64bit, 24GB RAM, EVGA gtx 580 3GB classified, MSI X58M , SSD as drive c, several sata2/3 HDDs, PP CS6

       

      Regards

        • 1. Re: PSU power?
          cc_merchant Level 4

          Big PSU.

          The PSU is one of the most crucial components in any system but also the one component most often overlooked. A good PSU will give you years of reliable work on your PC, a suboptimal or mediocre PSU will give you tremendous headaches and unexplainable crashes, hangs or errors, causing you to miss deadlines.

          Go to eXtreme Power Supply Calculator Pro v2.5 and get the Pro version. Enter all your components, including planned expansions, set the Motherboard to High End - Desktop, set the CPU Utilization (TDP) to 100%, set System Load to 100% and Capacitor Aging to 30% and press the Calculate button. Add 10 - 15% to this Wattage for safety and note the required amperage on the various rails (+3.3V, +5V and +12V). Based on these figures, select a good GOLD or PLATINUM label PSU, that meets the total wattage and the amperage on each rail. It is your best guarantee for long and reliable, trouble-free editing.

          It is a myth that a big PSU uses more electricity than a small PSU. If the system needs 600W to run, a 650W PSU will use 600W and run at 92% of its capacity. A 1200W PSU will draw the same 600W from the wall outlet, but runs at 50% of its capacity. It is comparable to a Formula 1 race with a safety car situation. Bernd Schneider in his Mercedes AMG safety car will run at 92% of its capacity, the Formula 1 cars run at 50% of their capacity.


          See in context: Tweakers Page - What kind of PC to use?

          • 2. Re: PSU power?
            naumen Level 1

            i found there the following:

             

            It is a myth that a big PSU uses more electricity than a small PSU. If the system needs 600W to run, a 650W PSU will use 600W and run at 92% of its capacity. A 1200W PSU will draw the same 600W from the wall outlet, but runs at 50% of its capacity. It is comparable to a Formula 1 race with a safety car situation. Bernd Schneider in his Mercedes AMG safety car will run at 92% of its capacity, the Formula 1 cars run at 50% of their capacity.

             

            if its true - i am very happy that i got a 1000w psu, i use Calculator and its says i need just 550w.... so i am good.

             

            Glad its finally confirmed

            • 3. Re: PSU power?
              ECBowen Most Valuable Participant

              The PSU's pull their rated load or even a little over if they have over drive ability for the first initialization seconds. Once all electronics and hardware have initialized they idle down to their operational load. However if you purchase any Line Interactive UPS units you have to go by the initialization load and not the operational load. That has to do with the transformer on the main circuit. Their not rated for a greater load than what the UPS is rated to handle.

               

              Eric

              ADK

              • 4. Re: PSU power?
                naumen Level 1

                thank u ! it was very useful info!