5 Replies Latest reply on Oct 21, 2013 8:45 AM by ssprengel

    Camera raw no longer supports my camera/lens.

    Mary Bernard

      I'm running Camera Raw 8.2. In earlier versions of Camera Raw the lens tab supported my camera and lens, an Olympus E-400 with a Zuiko 12-60 f2.8-4 zoom. Now it doesn't. Is there something I can do to get back support for this camera/lens?

       

      Thanks, Mary

        • 1. Re: Camera raw no longer supports my camera/lens.
          ssprengel Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          Adobe doesn’t supply any Olympus lens profiles; however, you can find several profiles for a 12-60 lens in the Adobe Lens Profile Downloader if you replace the OLYMPUS in the Camera Make filter with a hand-typed OLYMPUS Imaging:

           

          http://www.adobe.com/support/downloads/detail.jsp?ftpID=5492

          • 2. Re: Camera raw no longer supports my camera/lens.
            Mary Bernard Level 1

            Thank you so much. I followed your instructions and now have my camera and lens in the lens tab of Camera Raw.

             

            How strange that Adobe no longer supports it. They certainly did for several years!

             

            Am I right that I’ll need to reload the profile with every update of Camera Raw?

             

            Best wishes

             

            Mary

             

            >> http://www.adobe.com/support/downloads/thankyou.jsp?ftpID=5492&fileID=5488 <<

            • 3. Re: Camera raw no longer supports my camera/lens.
              ssprengel Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              The profiles that the LPD installs are under your user library, not in the program area where ACR gets them from.  In the past you could mix user-contributed and Adobe-supplied profiles together, but a couple years ago, I think, Adobe updated things so you cannot do that, anymore.  What version of ACR did you have prior to 8.2 when the Olympus profiles were intact?

              • 4. Re: Camera raw no longer supports my camera/lens.
                Mary Bernard Level 1

                I’ve had every version of ACR since it was first available with Photoshop. I bought the Olympus E-400 in December 2006, a 50 mm macro in 2007 and the 12-60 zoom in 2008. I can’t actually remember when I first used the lens tab and found my lenses on it; but I do have a note that Olympus had gone from the camera list in late 2012.

                What I do know is (a) that the Olympus brand and my lenses were there at some stage, and (b) that I didn’t have to download the Adobe Lens Profiler to get the profiles. I downloaded it yesterday for the first time.

                 

                However, today I’ve been searching for more information, and found this in the Lightroom Micro 4/3rds Talk Forum at http://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/3176384:

                 

                …the difference with the traditional digital camera systems is that lens correction data in m4/3 is stored in the lens firmware and communicated to the camera through the electronic connections in the lens mount. The data is used in in-camera JPEG production and is included in the output raw files. Adobe Lightroom and other converters can use this data for their own conversions. Hence no separate lens profiles are needed for native m4/3 lenses. Neat huh?

                 

                Neat indeed, if it’s also true of ACR. I guess it must be included in ‘other converters’. Can anyone verify that this is really true of Olympus cameras/Zuiko lenses?

                 

                Mary

                 

                >> <<

                • 5. Re: Camera raw no longer supports my camera/lens.
                  ssprengel Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  You can confirm that lens profiles are always being applied for your lenses if you shoot RAW and JPG of the same regular pattern, like a brick wall or even some tall buildings, and see if the distortion is corrected similarly in the JPG by the camera and in LR w/o a lens profile explicitly chosen.

                   

                  Adobe hasn’t figured out a way to communicate that  a camera has lens profiles that are always on, because of some non-disclosure-agreements with camera manufacturers that preclude them releasing this information.