6 Replies Latest reply on Oct 23, 2013 9:40 AM by thedigitaldog

    Preserve vs Convert (embedded) color profile? | Scanning workflow

    IdamIndia Level 1

      Assumptions:

      I have learned the following:

      1. Respect color profiles (preserve embedded profile)

      2. Work in at least AdobeRGB (working space)

      3. Convert to profile only as the last step, before printing (your printer may nto respect embedded profile)

       

      Do comment if any of the above general assumption is wrong or in what conditions it can be dangerous (=colors appear unexpected!)

       

      Question:

      Should the step1, while respecting the profile, not convert to the workign space? Since we dont ever have to revisit the scanner. We just have to now edit and continue towards output, converting may be desireable I felt.

       

      Specifically, what are are pros and cons of the two choices to let me choose preserve embedded profile vs convert to working  space (both respect the embedded profile, isn't it?)

       

      Note: Searching for the topic I only got things related to assigning vs converting to a selected profile. My question is not about that. It is about wheater to keep the tagged (scanner) profile or convert it to working space while opening the image.

        • 1. Re: Preserve vs Convert (embedded) color profile? | Scanning workflow
          jdanek Level 4

          Are you in a closed loop work environment or an open loop work environment?  What is the profile of the scanned image?  Have you gone through the scanner calibration process?  Typically, you want to "capture" as much information as possible when scanning.  The scanner profile may or may not match your working profile.  In such a case where the scanner profile does not match, then, depending on the output device, you may want to convert to working profile.  But, if you are printing to an inkjet device in a photographic workflow, you may be able to retain the profile used in the scanner.  This all depends on application color settings and RIP calibration ( if any ).  Many print vendors will accept a converted file to adobe RGB, in such a workflow, you'd have to decide if that is the proper protocol.  If you are capturing in adobeRGB, then no conversion is necessary.

          • 2. Re: Preserve vs Convert (embedded) color profile? | Scanning workflow
            TurgayOrhan Level 1

            I'm not a color management pro ... but I feel that you should convert it to the working space which you prefer to work in PS. It is not a good practice to edit images in PS with a scanner profile.

            • 3. Re: Preserve vs Convert (embedded) color profile? | Scanning workflow
              IdamIndia Level 1

              Thanks TurgayOrhan. I think I will just follow the advise to "convert to WS for scanner profiles". But are there reasons why this should be done, keep as tagged vs convert to WS? It would be good to know that.

              • 4. Re: Preserve vs Convert (embedded) color profile? | Scanning workflow
                IdamIndia Level 1

                I am digitising my slides and b/w negatives. I run a HDR multi exposure scan in SilverFast to later edit in Silverfast HDR. For selected photos I do need to touch up in Pshop. Where and how it will print is open. Is that what you mean by "open loop" workflow?

                 

                Unfortunately I don't have IT8 targets to calibrate my scanner, but using a generic scanner profile by manufacturer (plustek).

                 

                jdanek wrote:

                 

                The scanner profile may or may not match your working profile.  In such a case where the scanner profile does not match, then, depending on the output device, you may want to convert to working profile.  But, if you are printing to an inkjet device in a photographic workflow, you may be able to retain the profile used in the scanner.  This all depends on application color settings...

                I want to know if I should convert or retain the scanner profile to be able to set my application (Pshop) color setting accordingly. Though you say I "may" convert, which I feel may be good. But I don't exactly know WHY it would be good to covert vs keep embedded. Either way, Pshop will allow me to work just the same way. Or not?

                • 5. Re: Preserve vs Convert (embedded) color profile? | Scanning workflow
                  jdanek Level 4

                  What RGB color space is applied in the scanner?  ColormatchRGB, ProPHOTO, sRGB, or AdobeRGB?  Or none?  When I scan, I scan to .tif using the scanner's generic driver ( just like you ).  I interpret that scenario to assuming the capture is somewhat RAW data.  I have not calibrated the scanner ( HP All-In-One ) and use it for general purpose office scans.  I have, in the past, used Silverfast and have also calibrated a work station scanner on a professional level.  However, I do not recall assigning an RGB colorspace to the scans, only a scanner profile used in the driver.  Now, since you are i an open-loop workflow, you probably should assign a profile upon opening the scan in Photoshop.  That profile should fit whatever output device you plan on going to with the file.  In most cases, Adobe RGB supplies plenty of gamut to go to most output devices.  ProPHOTO is a good option ( 8-bit and/or 16-bit ) for a photographic workflow ( inkjet, wide format ).  Calibration at the scanner level will give you optimized results before conversion at Photoshop.  The entire process is a bit complex, but suffice it to say you are on the right track coverting in Photoshop to whatever the output device is ( including internet [ sRGB ] ).

                  • 6. Re: Preserve vs Convert (embedded) color profile? | Scanning workflow
                    thedigitaldog MVP & Adobe Community Professional

                    jdanek wrote:

                     

                    What RGB color space is applied in the scanner? .

                    Scanner RGB (whatever RGB that scanner produces and as described by an ICC profile).

                    I interpret that scenario to assuming the capture is somewhat RAW data.

                    Raw is in the more modern definition of data** no.

                    ** http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/understanding-series/u-raw-files.shtml

                     

                    There is some 'raw' scanner data which is different and that is what could be profiled. The scanner software may or may not provide this for a profile or even support ICC profiles.