3 Replies Latest reply on Nov 15, 2013 11:21 AM by Curt Y

    How do I non-destructively sharpen, re-size and save my images if I'm using both LR & CS6?

    devstock0180

      Hi guys {and gals}... 

       

      Ok... here is my dilemma. I am having an incredibly difficult time understanding the best way to sharpen, re-size and save my images for both posting on the web and giving them to clients. I completed my first paid photo shoot (yay!), but as I finished editing each image, I re-sized it and posted it on my FB photography page. I later learned from a fellow at my local print shop that this is a destructive and irreversible edit (not yay! ).

       

      So...  before I pull out every last strand of hair on my head, I REAALLLYYYY need to get a good grasp on how to do the following things so that I can establish a good workflow: 1. Sharpen my image well {w/ Smart Sharpen}. Does this have to be done on a flattened image... and isn't flattening irreversible?  2. Re-sizing my images for both web display and client work/printing. Is it true that once I set it to 72ppi for web display, that I lose a great deal of the detail and quality? Do I need to create a copy of the file and have 2 different image sizes?

      I am self taught, learning off the cuff through tutorials and constant error... and I just want so badly to have a smooth and beneficial work flow in place.

       

      Currently, my workflow is as follows...  1. Load images into LR and convert to DNG files  2. Quick initial edit & then send into PS CS6  3. Perform detailed/layered edit(s)  4. {I know I'm supposed to sharpen now, as the last step, but am afraid to permanently flatten my image in case I want to tweak the layers later..}  5. Save the file (unflattened)  6. Go back into LR and Export the file to the appropriate place on my hard drive

       

      So... at this point, my image is still at 300ppi {not appropriate for web display}, unflattened {I'm told flattened images are ideal for client work and printing} and not as sharp as I want it to be {because I don't know when to apply Smart Sharpen filter}.

       

      HELP!!!!!!! 

       

      Thanks in adavnce for "listening" to me ramble...

       

      ~ Devon

        • 1. Re: How do I non-destructively sharpen, re-size and save my images if I'm using both LR & CS6?
          Curt Y Level 7

          It is hard to have a one size fits all image.  From what I understand ppi is meaningless to the web.  The only thing that it looks at is image size in pixels (height and width).  Sites may have different limits on what they accept.

           

          Are you starting with a RAW image?  What OS?

          • 2. Re: How do I non-destructively sharpen, re-size and save my images if I'm using both LR & CS6?
            devstock0180 Level 1

            Yes, I do shoot in RAW... and what do you mean by OS..?  {Sorry... }

             

            I was told that posting images on Facebook should be resized to 72ppi so that people can't steal them (with good quality, anyway).

             

            Like I mentioned in my "rant", I am also unsure when/where to apply the Smart Sharpen filter. I know it is supposed to be the last step, but I'm afraid to permanently flatten my image..

             

            I feel like this is supposed to be a pretty simple thing to understand, and I don't. Bleh.

            • 3. Re: How do I non-destructively sharpen, re-size and save my images if I'm using both LR & CS6?
              Curt Y Level 7

              There are a lot smarter guys on this forum than I so will let them give you ideas on the sharpen workflow.

               

              Is DNG the same as RAW in that all the edits are non-destructive?  With RAW all the edits are put on a separate XMP file and believe with DNG the XMP file is written to the image.  In this case would suggest you save the DNG then create a jpg to send to clients or on web.  A jpg will not save layers so it is by its nature flattened.

               

              Since you are new to this try this test to understand ppi.  Click on Image/image size. 

                    Change Document size to inches. 

                    Now uncheck "unsample image" as if this is checked all the pixels will be modified to adjust to the new size.  Unchecked no pixels will be changed.

                    Now adjust the resolution from 72 to 300 ppi (pixels per inch).  Note that the Image Size in pixels does not change, but the document size changes.  This means resolution is unchanged.

                    Now click "resample image" and change the resolution.  Note how the image size changes and document size stays the same.

               

              Bottom line quality of picture is the image size in pixels.  THe larger the numbers the higher the quality.

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