7 Replies Latest reply on Nov 17, 2013 11:13 PM by Mike M

    Why can't I access the download link for the newest Flash Player build?

    Nepal

      So I want to update my Adobe Flash Player...

      If I head over to Adobe.com and go to Download > Adobe Flash Player, I am sent to http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/?promoid=JZEFT

       

      Then, if I click "Install Now" (also my anti-virus does accept software installations) I am simply directed back to Adobe.com

      It's an infinite loop and no matter where I look for alternate downloads I am sent back to the same place with the "Install Now" button, again directing me to Adobe.com

       

      I currently run (newest) Mac OSX 10.8.5, (newest) Firefox 25.0.1, and Adobe Flash Player 11.9.900.117.

        • 1. Re: Why can't I access the download link for the newest Flash Player build?
          Mike M Level 6

          Re: Antivirus on a Mac...

          This comment applies to malicious software ("malware") that's installed unwittingly by the victim of a network attack. It does not apply to software, such as keystroke loggers, that may be installed deliberately by an attacker who has hands-on access to the victim's computer. That threat is in a different category, and there's no easy way to defend against it. If you have reason to suspect that you're the target of such an attack, you need expert help.

          All versions of OS X since 10.6.7 have been able to detect known Mac malware in downloaded files. The recognition database is automatically updated once a day; however, you shouldn't rely on it, because the attackers are always at least a day ahead of the defenders. In most cases, there’s no benefit from any other automated protection against malware.

           

          Starting with OS X 10.7.5, there is another layer of built-in malware protection, designated "Gatekeeper" by Apple. By default, applications that are downloaded from the network will only run if they're digitally signed by a developer with a certificate issued by Apple. Applications certified in this way haven't actually been tested by Apple (unless they come from the Mac App Store), but you can be sure that they haven't been modified by anyone other than the developer, and his identity is known, so he could be held responsible if he knowingly released malware. For most practical purposes, applications recognized by Gatekeeper as signed can be considered safe. Note, however, that there are some caveats concerning Gatekeeper:

          1. It doesn't apply to software that comes packaged as an installer. Treat all third-party installers with caution.
          2. It can be disabled or overridden by the user.
          3. It can be bypassed by some third-party networking software, such as BitTorrent clients and Java applets (see below.)
          4. It only applies to applications downloaded from the network. Software installed from a CD or other media is not checked.

          For more information about Gatekeeper, see this Apple Support article.

          Notwithstanding the above, the most effective defense against malware attacks is your own intelligence. All known malware on the Internet that affects a fully-updated installation of OS X 10.6 or later takes the form of so-called "trojan horses," which can only have an effect if the victim is duped into running them. If you're smarter than the malware attacker thinks you are, you won't be duped. That means, primarily, that you never install software from an untrustworthy source. How do you know a source is untrustworthy?

          1. Any website that prompts you to install a “codec,” “plug-in,” or “certificate” that comes from that same site, or an unknown one, is untrustworthy.
          2. A web operator who tells you that you have a “virus,” or that anything else is wrong with your computer, or that you have won a prize in a contest you never entered, is trying to commit a crime with you as the victim. [Some reputable websites did legitimately warn users who were infected with the "DNSChanger" malware. That exception to this rule no longer applies.]
          3. “Cracked” copies of commercial software downloaded from a bittorrent are likely to be infected.
          4. Software with a corporate brand, such as Adobe Flash Player, must be downloaded directly from the developer’s website. No intermediary is acceptable.

          Java on the network (not to be confused with JavaScript, to which it's not related) is always a potential weak spot in the security of any operating system. If a Java web plugin is not installed, don't install it unless you really need it. If it is installed, you should disable it (not JavaScript) in your web browsers. Few websites have Java content nowadays, so you won’t be missing much. This setting is mandatory in OS X 10.5.8 or earlier, because Java in those obsolete versions has known security flaws that make it unsafe to use on the Internet. The flaws will never be fixed. Regardless of version, experience has shown that Java can never be fully trusted, even if no vulnerabilities are publicly known at the moment.

           

          Follow these guidelines, and you’ll be as safe from malware as you can reasonably be.

           

          Never install any commercial "anti-virus" products for the Mac, as they all do more harm than good. If you need to be able to detect Windows malware in your files, use the free software ClamXav — nothing else.

           

          Remove ANY Antivirus software you have because YOU DON'T NEED IT WITH OS X.

          See: How to perform a "clean install" of Flash Player in Mac OS X

          • 2. Re: Why can't I access the download link for the newest Flash Player build?
            Nepal Level 1

            While I appreciate your comments on anti-virus, this has literally nothing to do with my question. Can you please address my question?

            • 3. Re: Why can't I access the download link for the newest Flash Player build?
              Mike M Level 6

              How to perform a "clean install" of Flash Player in Mac OS X

               

              Yes, I DID address the question.

               

              That page has instructions to download the "offline" installer, which bypasses the normal installer/downloader. It WON'T redirect to anywhere because there is NO connection software in it.

              • 4. Re: Why can't I access the download link for the newest Flash Player build?
                Nepal Level 1

                This reply better answers my question. Just had to say it plain and simple. Thank you. I read your whole previous reply and failed to see how my anti-virus software caused the problem.

                 

                -Newest version successfully installed using "How to perform a 'clean install' of a Flash Player in Mac OS X"

                Thanks again.

                • 5. Re: Why can't I access the download link for the newest Flash Player build?
                  Mike M Level 6

                  Glad it wokred.

                  The "Antivirus" info comes from a former Apple employee in the Apple forums.  It's sage advice. I've had seven Macs over the last eleven years and I've NEVER had Antivirus software on ANY of them, and I've NEVER had a virus on ANY of them. Put simply; you don't need it because there has never been a virus for OS X.  As the info stated, it will do more harm than good.

                  • 6. Re: Why can't I access the download link for the newest Flash Player build?
                    Nepal Level 1

                    Yea, I'm aware of the system security of OS X and have as well never encountered a virus. I use my anti-virus simply for its webshielding ("attack page" alerts and things like that) features and felt the need to add that in case that were the problem.

                     

                    For the sake of learning, how does it specifically cause more harm than good?

                    • 7. Re: Why can't I access the download link for the newest Flash Player build?
                      Mike M Level 6

                      "For the sake of learning, how does it specifically cause more harm than good?"

                       

                      By blocking access to updates (some critical) that would otherwise NOT be unavailable.
                      Antivirus companies are focused on Windows (there's a new virus created EVERY 20 MINUTES for one or more versions of Windows). They do not invest a lot of time and expense in their Mac products because they too, know that there is no such thing as a virus (an executable file - which DOESN'T run in a Unix based environment such as OS X) for Mac OS X. As a result, their Mac definitions are not updated as frequently as those for Windows, and a new release or update to a product like Flash Player may go weeks before the A/V company adds it to the list of acceptable links or downloads for their Mac client. Meanwhile, your software is out of date and may present its own security risk. Not to mention that you can't update it because it's "blocked" by your so-called "protection".

                       

                      As mentioned, the "Gatekeeper", which was initiated with OS 10.7 is a far better protection than any third party app will provide. Apple silently updates it at least four times a day. You never even see the updates occurring. You CANNOT say that about any commercial antivirus software.