10 Replies Latest reply on Dec 6, 2013 4:37 AM by Chuck Uebele
      • 1. Re: Does Adobe Block Some People from Reviewing Their Products?
        Curt Y Level 7

        You think it is plain and simple, but have no idea what you are talking about.  How about an example?

        • 2. Re: Does Adobe Block Some People from Reviewing Their Products?
          Stacey Bindman Level 1

          Glad to see that the forums are still crass and sarcastic, and Adobe allows this, yet

          when I wrote several reviews on CC Photoshop, they were never published!

           

          Weak workflow design:

           

          I'm adding type ( PS adds a new layer), then I decide to adjust the other layer of an image.

          When I  return to the type  layer, I need to press the T icon (type) in order to then continue typing.

          Simply returning to the layer should allow me to place my cursor where I had been before.

           

          Rasterization is weak, and only works when the DPI and image size are large.

           

           

          Some tools are very poor:

           

          Select >> Color range

          Fortunately there are other similar functions in PS to remedy this problem.

          Regardless of the parameters and adjustments that one uses, this tool does not select well.

           

          Removing distractions in a photo:

           

          The magic wand tool needs successive size reductions to maximize its use

          It works well if you follow this slow and tedious work flow.

          I simply purchased a non-Adobe software that works much better.

           

          I'm not going to add more, I once wrote that I'd like Adobe to send me a free copy of PS, and got "kicked around" on the forum.

          Using PS on a daily basis gets to have anybody realize the problems with PS. However, in all fairness, having started out with PS,it's hard to change.

          There just aren't any rivals yet to PS.

           

          I'd prefer that all of the Adobe employees and "members' answer the question and not add any personal insults to this question that I've added.

           

          Thanks!

          • 3. Re: Does Adobe Block Some People from Reviewing Their Products?
            Jeff Schewe Level 5

            Stacey Bindman wrote:

             

            Glad to see that the forums are still crass and sarcastic, and Adobe allows this, yet

            when I wrote several reviews on CC Photoshop, they were never published!

             

            Never published by whom? Based on the small sample you've written, could it be because of your writting? Just asking...

            • 4. Re: Does Adobe Block Some People from Reviewing Their Products?
              Curt Y Level 7

              We are just users, do not write or modify the code.  If you have specific problems in using a tool you need to be specific about what does not work as expected.  You are just rambling and therefore hard to pin down if there is a question here.

              • 5. Re: Does Adobe Block Some People from Reviewing Their Products?
                ssprengel Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                For once you’re being overly kind, Jeff, perhaps sarcastically so.

                • 6. Re: Does Adobe Block Some People from Reviewing Their Products?
                  Jeff Schewe Level 5

                  ssprengel wrote:

                   

                  ....perhaps sarcastically so.

                   

                  Yeah, that's it!

                   

                  :~)

                  • 7. Re: Does Adobe Block Some People from Reviewing Their Products?
                    Trevor.Dennis Adobe Community Professional

                    Stacey Bindman wrote:

                     

                    Does Adobe block some people from reviewing their products?

                     

                    That's the question - plain and simple.

                     

                     

                    Absolutely!!!!

                     

                    Black helicopter.jpg

                    • 8. Re: Does Adobe Block Some People from Reviewing Their Products?
                      Chuck Uebele Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                      Just looking over your list:

                       

                      Maybe I want to move the text and not edit it, so having the tool change based on a layer that I select could cause problems in a workflow.  Yes, I know that the text tool can move text, but if I'm adjusting a lot of elements in a layout, I don't want to be constantly changing my tool back to the move tool, just because I clicked on a text layer.

                       

                      If you rasterize a vector shape with into a low DPI image, yes, it's going to look like crap.  That's not PS, and just the way pixel based apps work.

                       

                      Personally, I love color range and find it an extremely useful tool.  You just have to realize that you sample size greatly affects the outcome, and that your images are loaded with noise that affects the results, but I use that to my advantage by going into the pixel level to select noise pixels that are way off in color, and this way I can very subtly shift the color.  Works great for people with ruddy faces.  With the current release of CC, Color range has been refined to make it possilbe to create a more controlable opacity mask.

                       

                      Magic wand is a very very old tool.  There are far better ways to make selections, but if Adobe removed it, you would hear the screams from the people who love it and use it all the time.  I used it often for a quick and dirty selection. 

                       

                      If you have found software that works much better, then that's great!  Use it.

                      • 9. Re: Does Adobe Block Some People from Reviewing Their Products?
                        Stacey Bindman Level 1

                        Hello csuebele,

                         

                        Thank you for taking the time to write an answer based on what I wrote.

                        Your answer for colour range was quite thorough, and confirmed what the problems that I was having.

                        Of course,PS had many other ways to handle the problem, and I've learned that.

                        An example would be Image Adjust >>>Selective Color tool.

                        I find that tool great when I need to remove unwanted colour in a product shot.

                        When you don't surround a tabletop item on a coloured foundation, the product will pick up unwanted reflected colour.

                        What you normally do is add either white or black around the product out of view of the camera frame. This blocks unwanted color relecting on to the product.

                         

                        Here's another problem, and a solution that I have found,but I have to use another slightly different tool in PS - the polygonal lasso, which I feel I shouldn't have to!

                         

                        The magnetic lasso had a similar problem as the color range. It cannot differentiate suble nuances of colour, contrast,light and dark and so forth.

                        As a result, the lasso point will attach itself to parts of a path that I don't want touched.  I would think that since PS and all programs similar are mathematically and digitally written, a program could be able to differentiate between suble colours. An analogy would be a very senstive weight scale can differentiate between .005 grams and .0053 grams.

                         

                        As such, I  find I have to use the polygonal lasso to do the job,since I use it manually rather than automatically as the magnetic lasso.

                         

                        Here is an example of an idea (and I have lots!) that I would like to have Adobe give me a "free copy"" of PS in return for my effort and work:

                         

                        Take the polygonal lasso and make it slightly magnetic. I find that when I do a capture around many round objects in a photo, it takes way too long.

                        Imagine having the polygonal lasso sightly magnetized, so that straight lines would "bend" in a capture. A circle really is made up of many tiny lines that are slightly bent from each other, such as .03 degrees. So again relating computer programs to math,why can't my suggestion be be adopted to the polygonal lasso?

                         

                        Of course, like many of Adobe's menus,tools, and sub-menus, I have "worked around" the polygonal lasso to expedite my "issue" with this tool, which in all honesty I have to admit is a small one. However, I find that as I mentioned,working day in and day out with PS, there are and have been carry-over issues and problems with PS that migrate from version to version.

                         

                        So Adobe PS creators and programmers, if you're reading this.......

                        • 10. Re: Does Adobe Block Some People from Reviewing Their Products?
                          Chuck Uebele Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                          As you mentioned, there are a lot of ways to do things in PS.  I must admit, the magnetic lasso tool is one of my least favorites.  While color range and the magnetic lasso tool may not do what you want, they might work extremely well for other people and other types of images.  With the release of CS5, Adobe came out with a whole new way of refining edges of selections to enhance some of these very old tools.  Most people I've talked to in the proffesion opt for the pen tool to create selections for the ability to quickly select curved shapes like the circle.  While, as you mentioned a circle is made up of tiny striaght lines, which may be the case with some vector graphics apps, You would be hard pressed to see thse tiny lines on things like bottles or balls.  You would get down to the pixel level, which would cause lines rather than the actual item, and at that point you would want anti aliasing to make the item not look so choppy.  The selection tools at this time to snap to the pixels to create "little lines." 

                           

                          As far a a free copy of PS, you have to do a lot of work to get that, just ask, Jeff, whoes devoted years to the developement of PS.  If you're serious about helping Adobe improve PS, and want to see your ideas implemented, then fill out the form to join the prerelease:

                           

                          https://www.adobe.com/cfusion/mmform/index.cfm?name=prerelease_interest

                           

                          p.s. I'll be away from my computer for seveal days, so will not be able to respond.