10 Replies Latest reply on Jan 5, 2014 9:08 AM by Bill Gehrke

    How much would I gain by upgrading my graphics card with my current system?

    johnjv24

      I am currently a PreE10 user and was thinking of getting CS6 to improve my export times.  Right now in PreE10, it takes 94min to make 65min (5min is black video) SD DVD. My video footage is AVCHD 29.97 fps.

      I tried the CS6 trial with GPU MPE enabled and got 36min (CPU usage 30-40%, GPU usage 96%) when exporting a 65min clip (no black video) to MPEG-DVD. Of course, in CS6 this is the time of transcoding only, as I couldn't test the time of making a DVD in Encore.

       

      When I was using the trial CS6, it seemed a bit glitchy. I don't know if it was maybe to due the fact that the graphics card needs to be updated (rolled back graphics card for smoother PreE10) or because I need more RAM. Is this a valid assumption?

       

      Given my current system specs:

      Windows 7 Professional

      -Intel Core i7-3770

      16GB DDR3 RAM (forgot I had 16GB not 8GB)

      SanDisk 128 SSD (OS+Programs)

      WD Blue 1TB 7200RPM HDD (All media)

      GTX 650 1GB

       

      How much could I improve the 36min export time in CS6 if I upgraded my graphics card to a 650 Ti and 650 Ti Boost, respectively?

        • 2. Re: How much would I gain by upgrading my graphics card with my current system?
          johnjv24 Level 1

          Thank you for the link! What are page files? Also, how much improvement could I get from improving my disk setup? 25min or 15min export?

          • 5. Re: How much would I gain by upgrading my graphics card with my current system?
            Bill Gehrke Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            The first thing you should do is download GPU-z and look at your GPU memory usage during an export.  A 1 GB video card like yours might be marginal an cause it to revert to CPU usage.  As an example here is a screen grab showing more than 1 GB

            More-than-1GB-GPUz.jpg

            Notice that I had a GTX 680 with 2 GB of video RAM.  I suspect that this may not have been a problem if you do not have a highly complex timeline.

             

            With that our of the way then let me present some test data that was obtained by running the latest PPBM6 DE.  This direct export from Premiere as opposed to earlier testing with exporting via Adobe's Media Encoder (AME).I do not have any of the three GPU boards you referenced but you should be able to interpolate results to answer your question.

            MPEG2-DVD-w-GPU-Encoding-plus.jpg

            Just look at the CS6 x16 column.  Your GTX 650 has 384 CUDA cores and a memory bandwidth of 80 GB/s, way below the GTX 480.  Now you asked about an upgrade to the GTX 560 Ti Boost.  That unit has 768 CUDA cores and a video memory bandwidth of 144 GB/s.  That means slightly more cores than a GTX 580 but less memory bandwidth with only 144 GB/s.  I would venture a guess that on our PPBM6 DE test that moving from a GTX 560 to a GTX 560Ti Boost would give you somewhere around 6 +/- 2 seconds inprovement  which amounts to roughly a 12% improvement.  Hardly worthwhile in my opinion.  Also our benchmark uses highly GPU assisted effects and features, your timeline is likely to be less GPU assisted.

            • 6. Re: How much would I gain by upgrading my graphics card with my current system?
              johnjv24 Level 1

              The GPU memory usage is around 56-62%.  I appreciate your input as it is extremely helpful!

              • 7. Re: How much would I gain by upgrading my graphics card with my current system?
                RjL190365 Level 4

                I agree with the suggestion that your disk setup should be improved first before you perform a GPU upgrade. Currently, your system is set up to read and write to the exact same single (secondary) disk simultaneously, which a single SATA channel simply cannot allow (remember, SATA is a half-duplex interface, not a full-duplex interface like SAS is; as such, the SATA channel must wait for a block of data to finish transferring in one direction before any data can get transferred in the opposite direction). As such, upgrading the GPU will not provide as much of a performance improvement for the upgrade buck as simply adding an additional 7200 RPM disk to your current setup.

                 

                Speaking of your single 1TB WD Blue, which model numfer is it? The WD10EALS/EALX or the newer WD10EZEX? The WD10EZEX (single 1TB platter) is as fast as, if not faster than, the latest Seagate 7200.14 drives in sequential transfer performance (190-ish MB/s on the outer tracks). In comparison, the older EALS/EALX is about par for its disk generation (two 500GB platters) - 130-ish MB/s on the outer tracks.

                 

                And based on my own personal experience with both the older Fermi and the newer Kepler GPUs (in the mid-high range), don't assume that two GPUs with an equal number of CUDA cores running at equal core speeds and equal memory bandwidth will perform equal to one another. The architectures between the two are different from one another to allow this. In fact, in my main i7-3770K system (CPU overclocked to 4.2GHz) with factory-overclocked eVGA-branded cards, the GTX 660 (960 CUDA cores, 144 MB/s memory bandwidth) performed equal to that of an older GTX 560 Ti 448 (448 CUDA cores, 152 MB/s memory bandwidth). A large part of this is due to the Kepler GPU's relatively weak computation performance caused in large part by the lower shader clock to core clock ratio (unlike Fermi, which runs its shaders at double the core clock speed, Kepler runs its shaders at the same clock as the core clock). And looking back at several reviews that compared the GTX 650 (384 CUDA cores, 80 MB/s memory bandwidth) to the older predecessor GTX 550 Ti (192 CUDA cores, 98 MB/s memory bandwidth) revealed that the GTX 650 was generally slower in overall performance than the GTX 550 Ti.

                 

                Finally, Bill's specs for the "GTX 480" is actually for the GTX 470. The actual GTX 480 has 480 CUDA cores and a 177 MB/s memory bandwidth (the nVidia site's specifications page for the GTX 480 was messed up).

                • 8. Re: How much would I gain by upgrading my graphics card with my current system?
                  johnjv24 Level 1

                  RjL190365,

                   

                  "Currently, your system is set up to read and write to the exact same single (secondary) disk simultaneously, which a single SATA channel simply cannot allow (remember, SATA is a half-duplex interface, not a full-duplex interface like SAS is; as such, the SATA channel must wait for a block of data to finish transferring in one direction before any data can get transferred in the opposite direction)."

                   

                  • That is very interesting didn't realize the dramatic effect this has on my system. So my disk setup matters for exporting performance, even if I'm exporting directly to DVD? Forgive my ignorance.

                   

                  • My 1TB WD Blue is the WD10EZEX. Awesome! I guess my buddy picked the right one for me.

                   

                  "And based on my own personal experience with both the older Fermi and the newer Kepler GPUs (in the mid-high range), don't assume that two GPUs with an equal number of CUDA cores running at equal core speeds and equal memory bandwidth will perform equal to one another. The architectures between the two are different from one another to allow this. In fact, in my main i7-3770K system (CPU overclocked to 4.2GHz) with factory-overclocked eVGA-branded cards,....."

                   

                  • Thanks for the heads up! Yeah, I have noticed that people seem to say some of the older GPUs are sometimes better than the newer mid-range GPUs.

                   

                  I will definitely be looking into improving my disk setup.  I know I have already be provided with a helpful link, but what would you suggest as a disk setup for my current system specs and the fact that my main goal is to produce SD DVDs.

                  I have 6 available 3.5 Drive Bays in my tower.

                   

                  Thank you for the explanations and info!

                   

                   


                  • 9. Re: How much would I gain by upgrading my graphics card with my current system?
                    RjL190365 Level 4

                    RjL190365 wrote:

                     

                    And based on my own personal experience with both the older Fermi and the newer Kepler GPUs (in the mid-high range), don't assume that two GPUs with an equal number of CUDA cores running at equal core speeds and equal memory bandwidth will perform equal to one another. The architectures between the two are different from one another to allow this. In fact, in my main i7-3770K system (CPU overclocked to 4.2GHz) with factory-overclocked eVGA-branded cards, the GTX 660 (960 CUDA cores, 144 MB/s memory bandwidth) performed equal to that of an older GTX 560 Ti 448 (448 CUDA cores, 152 MB/s memory bandwidth). A large part of this is due to the Kepler GPU's relatively weak computation performance caused in large part by the lower shader clock to core clock ratio (unlike Fermi, which runs its shaders at double the core clock speed, Kepler runs its shaders at the same clock as the core clock). And looking back at several reviews that compared the GTX 650 (384 CUDA cores, 80 MB/s memory bandwidth) to the older predecessor GTX 550 Ti (192 CUDA cores, 98 MB/s memory bandwidth) revealed that the GTX 650 was generally slower in overall performance than the GTX 550 Ti.

                     

                    Finally, Bill's specs for the "GTX 480" is actually for the GTX 470. The actual GTX 480 has 480 CUDA cores and a 177 MB/s memory bandwidth (the nVidia site's specifications page for the GTX 480 is messed up).

                    Sorry for the error. I meant to say 144 GB/s memory bandwidth for the GTX 660, 152 GB/s for the GTX 560 Ti 448, 80 GB/s for the GTX 650, 98 GB/s for the GTX 550 Ti and 177 GB/s for the GTX 480. I mistyped "MB/s" instead of "GB/s".

                    • 10. Re: How much would I gain by upgrading my graphics card with my current system?
                      Bill Gehrke Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                      Thank you Randall!

                       

                      it just goes to show you that you cannot believe everything on the Internet.  Here is the GPU-Z report on my GTX 480  As you said, 480 CUDA cores and 177 GB/s

                       

                      GTX-480-GPUz.jpg