5 Replies Latest reply on Jan 7, 2014 4:00 PM by Tim Kurkoski

    "Add to Adobe Media Encoder queue" option very slow

    DA post prod Level 2

      Hello,

       

      The new "add to Adobe Media Encoder queue" directly from After Effects is great, but it is sooooo much slower than encoding directly from Adobe Media Encoder.

       

      My comp is very simple : it's a 90 min. length video that I'm trying to convert from 24 to 25 frames. I need a MPEG2 export for DVD, so I can't use AE because there're no option to export to MPEG2 files in AE.

      AME announced 10 hours of encoding, but after 5 hours it was only at a third of completion. So I rendered the movie in DNxHD, then encoded in AME : 1 hour for the DNxHD file, and 4 hours for the MPEG2. Much faster!

       

      I run After Effects CC (12.1.0.168) and AME CC (7.1.0.74) on a windows 7 system with i5 processor and 8go of RAM.

       

      Anybody else encoutered this issue?

        • 1. Re: "Add to Adobe Media Encoder queue" option very slow
          Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          Check your memory allocation settings. Sounds like you are starving the AME.

           

          I usually just render for DVD directly from my authoring program. Still uses AME and all the settings and eliminates a step.

           

          I'm curious about this statement:

            "My comp is very simple : it's a 90 min. length video that I'm trying to convert from 24 to 25 frames."

           

          Depending on the composition and it's source files there are very efficient ways to do this and very inefficient ways. Also, any modern tv/dvd player combination will play NTSC or PAL frame rates automatically. Are you positive this is a necessary step?

           

          One more note. The MPEG options were deprecated (removed but can be put back in preferences) because good MPEG compression requires multi pass compression and that is something that AE's output module is not capable of on it's own. That's why you should use the AME to do your serious pixel crunching.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: "Add to Adobe Media Encoder queue" option very slow
            DA post prod Level 2

            Actually my client needs a 25fps PAL DVD because it has to be sold on the european market. I could of course render directly in AME the 24fps file, but then I would get a freeze frame every second, unless I check the interpolation option which makes it even worse with some jittering, so I prefer to have a longer video with 25fps interpretation, that's why I use AE.

             

            Thanks for the MPEG options in AE, I didn't know I could put it back. But you're right, if there is no multipass it's useless.

            I'm curious so I've checked in the preferences, but I couldn't find the option. Do you know where it is ?

             

            My RAM settings for AE with multiple render disabled.

            AE settings.jpg

            • 3. Re: "Add to Adobe Media Encoder queue" option very slow
              Tim Kurkoski Adobe Employee

              Rick Gerard wrote:

               

              One more note. The MPEG options were deprecated (removed but can be put back in preferences) because good MPEG compression requires multi pass compression and that is something that AE's output module is not capable of on it's own. That's why you should use the AME to do your serious pixel crunching.

              That's not why we removed MPEG2, MPEG4, H.264 and WMV from the Render Queue in After Effects. We removed them because the software architecture used in After Effects for these formats is outdated and very buggy. AME's software architecture does a much better job of encoding these formats.

               

              It's true that the Render Queue in After Effects does not allow multi-pass compression, and that's good reason to use AME. However, improvements in single-pass encoding quality often make multi-pass compression unnecessary, especially at higher bitrates. Multi-pass encoding does not always produce better quality compared to single-pass encoding but it always takes longer to encode. I recommend you run tests with short samples of the most motion-complex sections of your composition, to determine which of single or two-pass encoding gives you the better results.

               

              To re-enable the legacy encoders in After Effects CC, open Preferences > Output and enable Show Deprecated Formats in Output Module Settings.

              1 person found this helpful
              • 4. Re: "Add to Adobe Media Encoder queue" option very slow
                DA post prod Level 2

                Thanks Tim for those highlights, I didn't know about the improvements in single-pass encoding. I'll try to run some tests to see how it performs.

                 

                As for the higher encoding time of exporting to AME frome AE, do you have any clue ?

                • 5. Re: "Add to Adobe Media Encoder queue" option very slow
                  Tim Kurkoski Adobe Employee

                  Tento wrote:

                   

                  As for the higher encoding time of exporting to AME frome AE, do you have any clue ?

                  Have you applied any effects to the footage in your After Effects comp? Are you using time remapping or the Time Warp effect? That will slow down the encode significantly. Also, what is the format of your source footage?

                   

                  Mind that, depending on what you're asking After Effects to render, encoding a comp via AME may not be as fast as using the Render Queue in After Effects. Feeding frames to AME via Dynamic Link incurs some memory overhead and limitations; for example After Effects can not render multiple frames simultaneously on different processors for Dynamic Link encodes.

                   

                  If I were you, I would try to solve the problems with AME transcoding your footage. You should bring the issue to the AME forum.  If you're fully committed to not using AME, I recommend using Premiere Pro, not After Effects, for this type of job.

                   

                  Regardless of all the above, I agree with Rick: you shouldn't need to transcode 24fps footage to 25fps for playback from DVD. DVD players will do that frame rate translation for you at playback time. But if your footage is not PAL dimensions (720x576), a DVD player won't necessarily convert the frame size, so transcoding at least the frame size is recommended. Bottom line: I would let your DVD authoring software (Encore?) handle the original file; it should do any conversions necessary when you set the DVD format to PAL.