3 Replies Latest reply: Jan 30, 2014 7:14 PM by JSS1138 RSS

    Premiere Adding Frames in Render

    thesantifox

      Hi,

       

      So here's the backtracking of what I did:

       

      Edited my footage in a sequence in normal size.

       

      I wanted to make it widescreen, so I made a new sequence in 1920x810.

       

      I then copy pasted my edit into the new sequence and started rendering.

       

      The render window kept adding frames to render, and the percentage jumps and very slowly adds 0.1% into the progress.

       

      I tried choosing a smaller amount to render, same problem still persists.

       

      Why does it now want to render normally? Why does it add frames to render all the time? Wheres the problem?       

        • 1. Re: Premiere Adding Frames in Render
          JSS1138 Community Member

          You're dimensions are weird.  Try 1920 x 800 instead, which is the standard 2.40:1 aspect.

          • 2. Re: Premiere Adding Frames in Render
            thesantifox Community Member

            Hi Jim Simon,

             

            I was told that 1920x810 is the standard RED Wide format. So I wanted my 5d video to look the same as the RED wide.

             

            "When a commercial widescreen movie is mastered for distribution on Blu-Ray disc, it's rendered at the full 1920-pixel width of the FHD format. Due to its wide aspect ratio, however, the movie's height covers only about 810 pixels of the 1080-pixel height of the screen, with upper and lower borders letterboxed. This 1920x810 frame is the native size of widescreen Blu-Ray video."

             

            And also I really don't think that the sequence size would matter to render the project.

            • 3. Re: Premiere Adding Frames in Render
              JSS1138 Community Member

              I was told that 1920x810 is the standard RED Wide format.

               

              I don't believe that's true.  At least, I've never seen those dimensions listed in any RED camera specs.

               

              More to the point, most deliverables are MPEG in one form or another, and MPEG works best when the dimensions are evenly divisible by 8.  So do give that 1920 x 800 a go and see what happens.