9 Replies Latest reply on Feb 20, 2014 7:42 AM by the_wine_snob

    How do I convert a photo to a traditional Oil Painting?

    cam71101

      Similar to the paintings below. I know there is a oil painting filter in Photoshop, but the results are not what I'm looking for. Any advice is much appreicated!

      cowper.jpg

      ivan-makarov-a-portrait-of-grand-princess-maria-aleksandrovna-first-half-of-the-19th-c.jpg

        • 1. Re: How do I convert a photo to a traditional Oil Painting?
          the_wine_snob Level 9

          If the Filters in Ps are not getting you what you want (might also need other adjustments, besides just the application of the Filters), you might want to look at Corel Painter. It interfaces well with Photoshop, but offers a world of "natural media" options, and many of those are in the area that I would typify as "painterly." I have used that program for many years (long before it was bought by Corel), alongside my Ps. Though Ps has added some similar Filters over the years, I still find many uses for Paint, and rely on it often. Though a separate, stand-alone program, think of it as a big plug-in set of Filters (literally millions). Besides the many "painterly" presets, it allows infinite control over so many aspects of the application of the Effects.

           

          Also, before the application of the "painting look," think about using other Tools, in Ps, to get you closer to what you want - that would be a good starting point.

           

          Good luck,

           

          Hunt

          • 2. Re: How do I convert a photo to a traditional Oil Painting?
            davidc1815 Level 4

            There is no single filter that will do this for you.  You need to remake the photo you are using in this style using other tools.  I would be looking at the the Smudge and Mixer brush tools used as cloners to give a smooth, delicate finish.  Consider how much bristle you want to show in the brush strokes - that will determine the brush tips you use.  Then add a canvas texture using the Texturizer filter or a Pattern Fill.  I never found a use for the Oil Paint filter - quite unconvincing in my view. Good luck.

            • 3. Re: How do I convert a photo to a traditional Oil Painting?
              Trevor.Dennis Adobe Community Professional

              I have never used it myself, but I have seen some impressive video tutorals doing this sort of thing with Corel Painter.  Try Google videos with 'Corel Painter oil painting'

              • 4. Re: How do I convert a photo to a traditional Oil Painting?
                DrStrik9 Level 4

                There's also Studio Artist, but I think it's Mac only. It can do amazing painterly things.

                 

                synthetik.com/

                • 5. Re: How do I convert a photo to a traditional Oil Painting?
                  SG... Adobe Employee

                  What's that famous line on how to get to Carnegie Hall?

                  • 6. Re: How do I convert a photo to a traditional Oil Painting?
                    Trevor.Dennis Adobe Community Professional

                    There's a plugin for opera?!

                    • 7. Re: How do I convert a photo to a traditional Oil Painting?
                      the_wine_snob Level 9

                      Sg,

                       

                      I agree. Isn't that "location, location, location... ?' No wait, that is what my realtor says. It's "practice, practice, practice."

                       

                      While Ps has added some interesting Filters, over the versions, there are still times, when I reach for my Painter, to go beyond - especially with the myriad of "watercolor" options - wet paper, dry paper, bleed, et al.

                       

                      To me, having both is a godsend, and I work with each (though Ps is where I normally start - Adobe, are you listening?), but Painter then comes into the mix. A wonderful program, though I am not the biggest fan of the Corel interface. On one old computer, I still have the Painter 4 (think that is correct), which was the last version of the Fractal Design version - just in case.

                       

                      Hunt

                      • 8. Re: How do I convert a photo to a traditional Oil Painting?
                        Trevor.Dennis Adobe Community Professional

                        I must admit you have piqued my interest Bill, but Painter 12 is still a bunch of dollars for an only occassionaly used application. 

                        • 9. Re: How do I convert a photo to a traditional Oil Painting?
                          the_wine_snob Level 9

                          Trevor,

                           

                          Yes, it was about the same price as Ps, way back when I first added it to my kit. I have upgraded many times, but have probably topped out at Painter X, since I am retired, and Corel has never had the best upgrade policy, IMHO.

                           

                          Still, if one is doing much "natural media" work, I find it to be a very useful program.

                           

                          Once, Painter and Ps were not so compatible with each other. Then, at about Painter 4 (think that was the last Fractal Design version, pre-Corel?), it added support for Layered PSD's. It did take another version, to get the full Layer support, and then, there were still some differences in HOW it supported them. I would always have to think a moment - "wait, I'm now in Painter... " Now things are much better, and over those years, Adobe has added more "natural media" Filters, but they are still separate programs, with separate functions.

                           

                          My workflow was to usually start the Image in Ps, then Save_As PSD, which I'd Open in Painter, and work on it. Then, I'd do another Save_As from Painter, and finish things in Ps. A more "dynamic link" would have been nice, but considering Adobe and Corel, that had never been expected.

                           

                          I do sing the praises of Painter, but if one only used it infrequently, I would have problems justifying the price, especially as more and more of its power has been added to Ps. Glad that I invested, when I did.

                           

                          Hunt