3 Replies Latest reply on Mar 2, 2014 5:34 PM by Rick Gerard

    How many processor cores available on 2013 Mac Pro?

    Evan Mather

      I have an early-2008 Mac Pro - 2 x (Dual Processor) 2.8GHz Quad-Core Xeon (Harpertown) which provides me with 8 CPUs (processor cores) available for After Effects CC (12.2.1.5). On order for February shipping (yes, it's March with no deliery in sight), I have a 2013 Mac Pro - 3.7GHz Quad-Core Xeon E5 (Ivy Bridge). Curious how many CPUs will be available for After Effects? Four? Dumb follow-up question: would I be better off staying with the early-2008 with it's more cores albeit slower processors for After Effects rendering? Thanks all.

        • 1. Re: How many processor cores available on 2013 Mac Pro?
          Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          The new MacPro, any of the CPU's, are way faster than the previous version. WAY faster. You can use all cores except the cores you assign to other apps for AE, but AE may not be able to utilize all that power on every project because of many factors. Nothing has changed on the number of cores assignable to AE, you're just getting a much faster processor and much faster buss speeds. Don't let the processor speed fool you. It's not like the old days when a 5 GHZ increase meant something. The 2.7GHz processor is actually faster than the 3.5GHz processor because of architecture, cache and number of cores. It's not just about GHz anymore.

          • 2. Re: How many processor cores available on 2013 Mac Pro?
            Evan Mather Level 1

            Thank you Rick. Is there a magic formula about how many CPUs, RAM, etc to reserve for other applications? Suppose I'm really talking about the multiprocessing settings in AE CC.

            • 3. Re: How many processor cores available on 2013 Mac Pro?
              Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              There are lots of threads about MP rendering. MP rendering can be fouled up by a codec or plug-in or temporal effect that kills it and makes it actually slower to render MP. Only about 1% of my projects benefit from MP rendering so I just keep it off.

               

              This will probably improve in the near future but any 3rd party plug-ins or any codec that does not support MP processing will kill the process. I am hoping that Adobe engineers are looking at a way to keep MP active for operations that support it and not allow incompatible plug-ins or codecs or temporal effects to completely kill the process so you don't have to keep turning MP on and off.