7 Replies Latest reply on Mar 2, 2014 10:32 PM by D Fosse

    Getting a pure white color

    Sensei Nacho Level 1

      How do I get a pure white color? The whitest thing I can find is beige.

        • 1. Re: Getting a pure white color
          Trevor.Dennis Adobe Community Professional (Moderator)

          Sample that beige colour with the eye dropper, and check its RGB values in the Info panel.  If it's values are 255, 255, 255 then it is pure white and your monitor needs calibrating.

           

          Or hit the d key to force foreground/background colours to black, and white, and hit the x key to make white the forground colour.  Select an empty lay, and use Alt backspace to fill the layer with white.  If it still looks beige, you need to calibrate your monitor.

          • 2. Re: Getting a pure white color
            Sensei Nacho Level 1

            Sorry for the late response. I tried it on my t.v. and it was pure white. How do I calibrate my monitor to fix this?

            • 3. Re: Getting a pure white color
              Trevor.Dennis Adobe Community Professional (Moderator)

              The proper way is to purchase a calibration device like the Spyder3 but they are expensive.  This LINK discusses its use.  Note that this link also tells you how to use calibration aids within your operating system, if you happen to have the right OS.

               

              There also lots of online aids to help you calibrate your monitor using the brightness and contrast controls on the front of the monitor like THIS ONE

               

              Or there are images you can download to help you adjust your monitor.  You should be able to see the individual segments from black to white, and the same for the three colour channels.  Note it is important to view this image full size, so click on it to expand it > Right click and copy, and paste into Photoshop.

               

              http://johnwiddall.files.wordpress.com/2012/08/jwcolourtestcard1024.png

              • 4. Re: Getting a pure white color
                D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                Trevor Dennis wrote:

                 

                The proper way is to purchase a calibration device ... but they are expensive.

                 

                 

                Expensive? Really?

                 

                B+H.jpg

                • 5. Re: Getting a pure white color
                  Noel Carboni Level 8

                  Thanks for posting that image, Trevor.

                   

                  Huh, just when you think you know a browser...

                   

                  IE11.png

                   

                  You may have to download this and display it in Photoshop to sense the difference...  Notice how differently the bright reds are shown when that (untagged) PNG is displayed by Internet Explorer 11 vs. by Photoshop.  This is especially interesting in light of the fact that I actually have calibrated sRGB monitors, and what I *thought* IE11 was doing was assuming untagged images are sRGB and doing more or less proper color-management of online images to sRGB.  Obviously there's a flawed assumption in there somewhere.

                   

                  Learn something new every day about this woefully imperfect computing environment we call home, and within which we strive for accuracy and consistently.

                   

                  Moral:  NEVER trust what you see in Internet Explorer.

                   

                  Secondary Moral:  Post online images with color profiles.

                   

                  -Noel

                  • 6. Re: Getting a pure white color
                    Trevor.Dennis Adobe Community Professional (Moderator)

                    The last three red segments all appear as one on my monitor even in Photoshop, but they all sample as 255,0,0 so they would do.  However, if I right click and save before loading into Photoshop, they view and sample as you'd expect the, to, so I actually gave bad advice in post #3.

                     

                    As for calibration hardware, the prices Dag posted are less than I expected, but we tend to pay a premium for such devices here

                     

                    Spyder4 Express NZ$219

                    X-Rite i1Display Pro NZ$495

                    X-Rite ColorMunki NZ$795  (A huge mark up!)

                     

                    Getting back to Noel's comments about browsers, I sometimes say to camera club members who are unsure about basic monitor calibration, if things look about right on the Internet, then you are probably not far off.  Looks like that was bad advice as well. :-(  So I really should scrap the Huey Pro that I know be compromised, but I've spent a bomb already this year, and have other priorities.  In fact I actually got with the program and replaced my aging Palm mobile that was more trouble than a fifteen year old PC running ME, with an iPhone 5s.   That was a lot of dollars when you consider I get maybe two calls a month, and don’t even know how to do Texting, and definitely don’t understand that strange text-speak language.  If they used Usenet acronyms I’d be fine.

                    • 7. Re: Getting a pure white color
                      D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                      Trevor Dennis wrote:


                      As for calibration hardware, the prices Dag posted are less than I expected, but we tend to pay a premium for such devices here

                       

                      Spyder4 Express NZ$219

                      X-Rite i1Display Pro NZ$495

                      X-Rite ColorMunki NZ$795  (A huge mark up!)

                       

                      Those prices are 5 - 10 % higher than the Norwegian prices, strictly based on exchange rate. But the main point was the comparison to SSD prices, which no one seems to complain about

                       

                      The Color Munki you looked at was probably the ColorMubki Photo, which is a complete display / printer solution that comes with a spectrophotometer and not a colorimeter. X-rite's naming conventions move in mysterious ways. You're not the first to mix up those two.