1 Reply Latest reply on Mar 4, 2014 5:23 PM by Joel Cherney

    "Headers and Footers" settings in table styles?

    creatureworks

      I thought I'd check here before submitting this as a bug.

      I'm trying to make all of the tables in my (long) document repeat their headers at the top of every text column.

       

      I can apply this setting to an individual table by selecting the table and going to Table > Table Options > Headers and Footers.

      But I do not see anywhere to set these header and footer settings in Table Styles.

       

      And, table styles do appear to honor these settings:

      Say I create a table and apply a table style to it. I check to make sure that there are no overrides applied to the table style. Now I go to Table > Table Options > Headers and Footers and change a setting there. Now the table style shows that I have overridden it. If I clear overrides, the setting is removed. If I don't clear overrides, and instead redefine the table style, it maintains the setting I've changed and I can apply that to other tables. But, when I view the table style's settings, nothing has been added to its list of Style Settings.

       

      Is this a bug? Thanks in advance to anyone who can either point me toward something I'm missing or confirm that I'm not crazy for expecting this functionality to be there.

        • 1. Re: "Headers and Footers" settings in table styles?
          Joel Cherney Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          Now, that's odd. You are not crazy! I am surprised that you can use all of the Cell Style section of the table style to specify, say, all the right columns to have a single cell style, and you can define which style the header will get when you go turn it on manually, but you can't define it in the style.

           

          I put it up to the fact that tables were a third-party plugin (by Woodwing? I can't remember who made it originally) that Adobe bought and added it to ID, and then left it unchanged for a decade. So maybe not a bug as such, but just an inconsistency in development.