4 Replies Latest reply on Mar 6, 2014 9:34 AM by Szalam Branched from an earlier discussion.

    transcoding

    Robotboyv02

      Looong story short, I was working on a project for a friend that I started out on PC and FINALLY moved the project over to a MAC to finish it. The video camera's original format was MPEG. (I converted the files to .MOV, thinking it would be more compatible since After Effects works in tandem with Quicktime.) I started to have the same issue as everyone: with .MOV files erroring during RAM preview and rendering.

       

      I downgraded to Quicktime 5 (because most forums say to downgrade), all the way back up with no success on my Windows 7 machine. From Quicktime 5 thru 6, the audio would play (ACC), but not the video (unknown compressor). Through all the Quicktime 7 series, I could see the video (H.264 now added to Quicktime 7), but began to get the audio error, again. Occasionally, the first file in the composition would play and then error out.

       

      I brought the project over to MAC and it imported the files fine.  I was able to RAM preview and render. The only thing Adobe After Effects asks me to do was re-title the project . . . I'll take it!

       

      Now going back to the original problem on my PC: I used a video converter to try out different file types on After Effects that would not produce an error. I found that MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 worked fine on my PC and MAC. So, if I need to cross over again, I know NOW to just use this format (container).

       

      I also decided that if I want to preserve the best quality from the "film," I can rip out the audio and just sync it to my project using the original MPEG from the camera. NOTE: I'd do this because the audio doesn't show up when I import the video to the project

        • 1. Re: solutions for problems with QuickTime files in After Effects CC (12.0)
          Szalam Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          Robotboyv02 wrote:

           

          Now going back to the original problem on my PC: I used a video converter to try out different file types on After Effects that would not produce an error. I found that MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 worked fine on my PC and MAC. So, if I need to cross over again, I know NOW to just use this format (container).

           

          NOooooooooooooooooo!

          MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 are lossy and compressed (not to mention, old) formats. They are not appropriate as intermediate codecs! At all! Never were! Not only are they compressed, but they use interframe compression which is not ideal for After Effects.

          Use DNxHD (from Avid), Cineform (from GoPro), Quicktime with the PNG codec, or Quicktime with the Photo-JPEG codec. Any of these work just fine in After Effects on Windows and Mac and aren't lossy.

          • 2. Re: solutions for problems with QuickTime files in After Effects CC (12.0)
            Robotboyv02 Level 1

            Thanks Szalam. I was only trying to help and the limited converter software I was currently using only converts to certain file types. I just loaded MPEG Streamclip and the Avid codecs. Please advise if there are better apps to use. Thanks for your help.

            • 3. Re: solutions for problems with QuickTime files in After Effects CC (12.0)
              Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              After Effects, Premiere Pro... Adobe Media Encoder are all way better than MPEG Streamclip.

               

              BTW, a PC can use Quicktimes just fine, just pick a frame based easy to decode codec like Jpeg 2000 or PhotoJpeg and you are good to go.

              • 4. Re: transcoding
                Szalam Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                Robotboyv02 wrote:

                 

                The video camera's original format was MPEG. (I converted the files to .MOV, thinking it would be more compatible since After Effects works in tandem with Quicktime.)

                This was likely the initial problem. MOV is just a container and whatever codec you used inside your MOV container caused the problems. Newer versions of AE (usually) work reasonably well with MPEG files, but if you do want to transcode them into a proper production codec, use Adobe Media Encoder to go to one of the formats Rick or I mentioned (note that most of them are MOV files, just with different codecs inside).