1 Reply Latest reply on Mar 20, 2014 12:16 PM by Joel Cherney

    Importing a TOC from Microsoft Word

    Craigoooo

      I'm working on a Medical instruction manual that was done in Microsoft Word.    The TOC came over and SEEMs to link up to it's appropriate areas but I'm having a hard double checking because of the naming conventions (i.e. "ref00084848").   I want to make sure the TOC links up to it's appropriate pages...and I'd also like to know how to make the pages dictate the TOC.  For example if we added a page which pushed pages,  is there a way for that to automatically update the TOC?

       

      One other question:  This manual is going to be dictated in several languages so it's 144 pages and the entire thing is threaded.   THere are diagrams with arrows pointing at specific things in photos with words.    Normally I would do it in illustator and place them in the text block to nest them but because their being translated I have to keep the all text in InDesign.  Is there an easy way to nest everything like this? 

       

      Thank you in advance!

       

      -Craig

        • 1. Re: Importing a TOC from Microsoft Word
          Joel Cherney Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          is there a way for that to automatically update the TOC?

          To completely destroy all of the xrefs that make up the imported Word TOC and rebuild a brand-new TOC with InDesign's Table of Contents tool.  Which you want to do anyways because:

           

          This manual is going to be dictated in several languages

          I'm guessing here that "dictated" means "translated." That Word TOC stuff, you'll barely be able to get it to work in English, don't try to send it through translation.

           

          THere are diagrams with arrows pointing at specific things in photos with words.    Normally I would do it in illustator and place them in the text block to nest them but because their being translated I have to keep the all text in InDesign.  Is there an easy way to nest everything like this?

          An anchored object would work here, I think - depending on how you expect the language service provider to work, what you expect to get back, and so on. You could place an InDesign file into another InDesign file, just as you could place an Illustrator file, but I can't tell if you expect to hand off a package with all links to your LSP, or if you are expected to just export IDML, and they expect to return only IDML for you to clean up (which is a pretty terrible translation workflow, but normal for the bottom end of the language industry, for what it's worth).

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