9 Replies Latest reply on Apr 8, 2014 10:56 AM by D Fosse

    Should I set my Dell 3008 monitor mode to Adobe RGB when calibrating it with i1 Display?

    thomasbrigantino Level 1

      Hi,

       

      Should I set my Dell 3008 monitor mode to Adobe RGB when calibrating it with i1 Display?

       

      Thank you,

       

      Thomas

        • 1. Re: Should I set my Dell 3008 monitor mode to Adobe RGB when calibrating it with i1 Display?
          D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          Short answer, no.

           

          Leave it at full native gamut. Adobe RGB has no particular significance in relation to a display, even though wide gamut units are often marketed as such.

           

          In a color managed environment the monitor profile is used for remapping the source data, whatever that may be. It's a straight up profile conversion, performed by the application on the fly. So it's document profile > monitor profile - and all that is required in that conversion is that each profile is an accurate decription of the color space it represents.

           

          IOW what you need is a monitor profile that accurately describes the monitor as it is.

          1 person found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Should I set my Dell 3008 monitor mode to Adobe RGB when calibrating it with i1 Display?
            thomasbrigantino Level 1

            Thank you kindly for the quick response...

             

            There is a full native gamut (Custom R/G/B) as well as an sRGB mode, I am thinking, from what you said, go with simply the (Custom R/G/B) mode which has all values of RGB at 100%

             

            Does that make sense?

             

            I really appreciate you getting back to me, this has been very troubling for the past few days and with all the information out there it is difficult to find solutions, thank you.

            • 3. Re: Should I set my Dell 3008 monitor mode to Adobe RGB when calibrating it with i1 Display?
              D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              Yes, use Custom. You want the unit in its native state.

               

              The sRGB setting could be useful if you must use software that isn't color managed (and won't use the monitor profile). But with a wide gamut monitor that's something you would tend to avoid if you have alternatives (like using Firefox instead of any other browser).

               

              Note that, as I said, the monitor profile needs to be an accurate description of the monitor as it is. This means that if you change any monitor settings, you need a new profile to describe that. You can have different calibration targets and profiles to accomodate this - but then you have to relaunch Photoshop because it needs to load the correct profile at startup.

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              • 4. Re: Should I set my Dell 3008 monitor mode to Adobe RGB when calibrating it with i1 Display?
                thomasbrigantino Level 1

                Okay, thank you once again for the quick reply.

                 

                I calibrated in full native gamer, things seem so far, so good.

                 

                I work with file that has a color profile of Adobe RGB 1998 and set that as the working space in Photoshop.

                 

                I did notice that in the other Windows folder where the preview area is tends to show colors to off, more vibrant as opposed to the Photoshop workspace. I also went to "Save for web" and checked Convert to sRGB with Monitor as the preview. It looks exactly like the preview in the side preview area found in the Windows folder where the file resides. I opened the same file in Chrome, looks the same as it did in the Photoshop working area. Opened it in Internet Explorer and it shows a more vibrant version, the same found in the preview area of the Windows folder. I also transfered the file through a home network to another computer. The Windows folder preview, Internet Explorer, Chrome all look the same as the Photoshop working area...any ideas as to maybe why?

                 

                I hope I am explaining this correctly...I have been trying to figure this issue out for the past 5 nights and I just can't seem to get it right. I have color issues with files being transfered to a client and their Mac shows more vibrant color as well...it is just so tricky to figure how to keep color continuity, I just I am completely over thinking it.

                 

                Thank you again for taking the time to assist in this process.

                • 5. Re: Should I set my Dell 3008 monitor mode to Adobe RGB when calibrating it with i1 Display?
                  D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  Here's my stock answer to all questions regarding wide gamut monitors:

                   

                  A wide gamut monitor must be used with fully color managed software to work as intended. It must be calibrated and profiled for that software to have a valid monitor profile to work with.

                   

                  These are absolute requirements, and an unavoidable implication of buying a wide gamut unit. Lots of unsuspecting people don't realize this, and the manufacturers aren't helping. There should be a huge sticker on the screen to this effect.

                   

                  Here's the thing: Lots of applications aren't color managed, and they will display oversaturated. No way around that - except cripple the unit by using the sRGB preset. That applies to many native Windows applications such as Windows Explorer, including the Windows desktop. Also many browsers drop color management for untagged material - only Firefox is usable if set to color management mode 1. IE is completely useless.

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                  • 6. Re: Should I set my Dell 3008 monitor mode to Adobe RGB when calibrating it with i1 Display?
                    thomasbrigantino Level 1

                    Okay, huh...marketing at its best when it comes to wide gamut monitors...

                     

                    Again, thank you for the responses as I finally feel I am making progress with this issue.

                     

                    One last question, if I convert the Adobe RGB profile to sRGB in Photoshop why is the result not the same when I "Save for Web" and check the "Convert to sRGB" using the monitor profile?

                     

                    That is my last question, thank you for spending the time to answer all the rest; greatly appreciated.

                    • 7. Re: Should I set my Dell 3008 monitor mode to Adobe RGB when calibrating it with i1 Display?
                      D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                      It fully depends on what application you are using to view the file. That's the key. Without color management - a full remapping into the monitor profile - it won't display correctly. Again, IE is useless and you can just forget it. Use Firefox with color management mode 1.

                       

                      With a standard gamut monitor you can get away without color managing because the monitor is close enough to sRGB that it will be roughly right, as long as the file has sRGB numbers. That's why sRGB became the internet standard.

                       

                      But if you have a complete color management chain the source profile can be anything you like, and the monitor can be standard or wide or anything in between, and it will display correctly regardless. This is the whole point of color management - one color space (the file) being remapped into the other (the monitor).

                      • 8. Re: Should I set my Dell 3008 monitor mode to Adobe RGB when calibrating it with i1 Display?
                        D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                        Just to sum up regarding web: Standard operating procedure is to convert to sRGB and embed the profile. Done.

                         

                        For people with standard gamut monitors that will always display correctly - exactly right in a color managed browser; roughly right and close enough in a nonmanaged one.

                         

                        For people with wide gamut monitors there is no such choice. For correct display, you must use a color managed browser, and color management has to work in all situations. Only one browser qualifies and that is Firefox. Safari, Chrome, IE - they all fail with wide gamut monitors.

                         

                        What makes Firefox unique is that it can be set to assign sRGB to untagged material. Most other browsers drop all attempts at color management when there is no embedded profile - and there is a lot of untagged stuff on the web. This will display with the wide gamut oversaturation that you have seen.

                         

                        To enable this in Firefox, type "about:config" without the quotes in the address bar, hit refresh/go, and scroll down to gfx.color_management.mode. Double-click it and change it from the default 2 into 1. Restart Firefox, and you're all set.

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                        • 9. Re: Should I set my Dell 3008 monitor mode to Adobe RGB when calibrating it with i1 Display?
                          D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                          Hopefully Thomas has this figured out by now. But since this is a recurring question and many people struggle with it, let me close off with a simple three-point checklist.

                           

                          But first: If you have a wide gamut monitor and you see oversaturation, don't panic. Nothing's "wrong". It is in fact fully expected and normal behavior, given the fact that color management is not yet universally implemented.

                           

                          And to those whose eyes tend to glaze over when they hear the words "color management": Take a deep breath, and repeat after me: Color management is not the problem. It is the solution. Yes, I know you frequently hear this from young men in black suits who ring your doorbell at six o'clock in the evening, but we're not talking metaphysics here.

                           

                          ---

                           

                          So, the checklist. This will establish whether you're looking at the end result of a color managed display pipeline - or not.

                           

                          1. Does the image have an embedded document profile, and is that profile the correct one?

                           

                          2. Do you have a monitor profile that is an accurate description of your monitor? Is the profile where it should be, so that applications can find it?

                           

                          3 - and here's where it usually goes wrong: Are you viewing the file in an application that will read and use both those profiles, and perform the prescribed remapping / conversion from one into the other? IOW is it color managed at all?

                           

                          ---

                           

                          If you can honestly put a checkmark on all of these three, and you still see oversaturation, it's time to reduce the intake of hallusinogenic drugs. Once back from rehab, you'll see that your wide gamut monitor is now displaying all colors correctly.