9 Replies Latest reply on May 24, 2007 7:29 AM by Newsgroup_User

    How do I learn to script?

    gvoth
      I use Director on the Mac graphically. It works well but there are things I've seen using scripting that blow me away. I can't seem to get my head around scripting - what it's form needs to be and why. I'm beginning to read Macromedia's reference on the Adobe site...

      I guess I need to see some easy how to's that build some confidence because most of the lessons I scan leave me cold. Is there a quick read out there that really spells out how to start taking advantage of this powerful part of Director?
        • 1. Re: How do I learn to script?
          Level 7
          Dean (a forum regular here) has some pretty nice lingo tutorials
          http://www.fbe.unsw.edu.au/Learning/Director/

          Don't beat yourself up over this. If you've never done any programming
          before then you will really be learning two things at once; the fundamentals
          of programming and Director's implementation of programming. Take small
          steps making sure you understand how the script really makes things happen.

          Anyone can learn to program. You have already demonstrated your motivation
          by coming here. Good luck!

          "gvoth" <webforumsuser@macromedia.com> wrote in message
          news:f2va5t$n2n$1@forums.macromedia.com...
          >I use Director on the Mac graphically. It works well but there are things
          >I've
          > seen using scripting that blow me away. I can't seem to get my head around
          > scripting - what it's form needs to be and why. I'm beginning to read
          > Macromedia's reference on the Adobe site...
          >
          > I guess I need to see some easy how to's that build some confidence
          > because
          > most of the lessons I scan leave me cold. Is there a quick read out there
          > that
          > really spells out how to start taking advantage of this powerful part of
          > Director?
          >


          • 2. Re: How do I learn to script?
            James Newton, ACP Level 3
            Start small and build on what you know.

            My easiest articles for learning about scripting are these:
            Look, no sprites!
            Keeping tabs on Director

            You can also find a number of demo movies, written in answer to questions on this and other forums, in my signature below.
            • 3. Re: How do I learn to script?
              Level 7
              Do use the help function (F1) in director as often as needed. Most of
              the time you'll have nice and short expamples. So you won't end up
              learning the syntax by trial and error.

              Use the message window to try commands before coding real. This makes it
              easier and faster to find errors. Use the command listings in code- or
              message- window to find the right commands (you find them at the top
              buttons in code or message window).

              Search google groups to find a solution for your problems. You'll find
              many code examples that way and you event don't have to ask (and we
              don't have to answer again :) ).

              Keep you code simple, do make comments so you will understand your own
              code two months later.

              You may want also keep some common functions with your projects. You
              will do many code stuff again and again in the beginning. Building
              functions and carry them with your projects will save you much time - at
              least in future.
              • 4. Re: How do I learn to script?
                Level 7
                Hi Gvoth,

                There isn't a single method to learn to code just as there's no single method to
                learn anything. I even struggle with working out the best way to teach
                programming. People learn in different ways and programming can be very
                challenging for a beginner as it requires you to think in a very different way.
                So, take what various people had advised here, but don't worry if you find some
                things (even my tutorials) aren't working. Just keep trying and you'll come a
                cross a way of doing things and learning that will best suit you.

                That all said, here are my links.
                My Lingo tutorials are in column 2 of (Thanks Dave C for the compliment) :
                http://www.fbe.unsw.edu.au/learning/director/

                My web resources have a lot of Lingo resources sites. it is at:
                http://www.fbe.unsw.edu.au/learning/director/resources/

                I even have a small section of links for Programming (which I need to update)
                http://www.fbe.unsw.edu.au/learning/director/resources/#prog

                There was a great article of the fundamentals of programming at:
                http://www.scotlandsoftware.com/articles/programming/
                I just went to the page now and it looks like the site has been hijacked. not sure
                if this is temporary. If you want a copy of the article, email me off list
                (d.utian@unsw.edu.au). It is definitely worth looking at.

                Hope that helps.

                regards
                Dean

                Director Lecturer / Consultant / Director Enthusiast
                http://www.fbe.unsw.edu.au/learning/director
                http://www.multimediacreative.com.au
                email: d.utian@unsw.edu.au

                • 5. Re: How do I learn to script?
                  Level 7
                  Rules of learning computer programming:

                  1) Your first program will attempt to display the words "Hello World!"
                  2) After making your first program work, your second program will attempt to
                  display the words "Hello World" several times.
                  3) Your third program will ask you to enter your name and then display it.
                  4) Your fourth program will extend your third program and greet you with
                  some message pertaining to the time of day.

                  There, now you know everything about computer programming that was ever
                  useful :-)

                  And for anyone that wants to call me a cynic, I can re-write those as if
                  they were computer-class topics:

                  1) Introduction to the development environment.
                  2) Introduction to control structures.
                  3) User interaction, data validation.
                  4) Interacting with the system.

                  Learning to write scripts is not just about knowing the language, it's being
                  able to translate into the language from the way you (or the customer) would
                  describe a task. And searching google groups.

                  Andrew


                  • 6. Re: How do I learn to script?
                    Level 7
                    If Kernighan & Ritchie had a nickel for every beginner that wrote a "Hello
                    World" program...


                    • 7. Re: How do I learn to script?
                      Level 7
                      Dave C wrote:
                      > If Kernighan & Ritchie had a nickel for every beginner that wrote a
                      > "Hello World" program...

                      I think they have :-)

                      You may have missed this from a few years ago:
                      "In an announcement that has stunned the computer industry, Ken Thompson,
                      Dennis Ritchie, and Brian Kernighan admitted..."
                      http://www.galactic-guide.com/articles/2U20.html

                      Andrew


                      • 9. Re: How do I learn to script?
                        Level 7
                        If anyone is interested in reading taht programming article I reffered to email
                        me. I just read it again and really is a great introduction to programming
                        thinking and how to get started. Here's a section.

                        From - Introduction to Programming, Matt Gemmell, Scotland Software
                        "
                        Where to start
                        The question of exactly where to start learning to program is a big one, and it's
                        something that everyone has an opinion about (even your postman may have a
                        strongly-held opinion on this subject). I'm going to try to be as practical as
                        possible about answering this, but just be aware that personal preferences (in
                        terms of programming languages, books, programming environments, and so on) will
                        always creep in somewhere. I do however promise to be as impartial as possible
                        (which isn't too difficult when you're as unquestionably great as I am).

                        You may think that the obvious first step would be to choose a programming
                        language, probably by weighing up the various pros and cons of each major
                        language. However, when someone begins a sentence with "you may think that",
                        there's a fair chance that they're going to tell you that you were wrong to think
                        whatever it was. I'm not exactly going to do that; instead I'm going to point out
                        something that you must realise before going any further:

                        • Programming is programming

                        You're probably thinking "you don't say" (or something less kind), but there
                        really is a valid point in there. You see, there are fundamental similarities
                        between all programming languages, so as a beginner it's really not so important
                        which language you begin with; the important thing is to just get some experience
                        with programming. So, you're really free to choose a language, up to a point. Just
                        be aware that there's no "wrong" language to start with.
                        "

                        That's just a taste of the article. Well written, funny, interesting and great
                        info on what programming is about, different languages, jargon and programming in
                        general.

                        regards
                        Dean

                        Director Lecturer / Consultant / Director Enthusiast
                        http://www.fbe.unsw.edu.au/learning/director
                        http://www.multimediacreative.com.au
                        email: d.utian@unsw.edu.au