13 Replies Latest reply on Apr 22, 2014 8:02 AM by memitch

    Converting a file format

    memitch

      I created a video clip on my Sony Camcorder. The disc shows a folder containing 6 files: 2 BUP files, 2 IFO files and 2 VOB files. When I try to bring the clip into Adobe Premier Elements 11, the files that show up are VIDEO_TS.VOB and VTS_01.VOB. Although I can import them through Add Media, they do not play clean. They have lots of wierdness happening. How can I convert the files to an acceptable file format? And do I have to convert all 6 files? Thanks, Mitch

        • 1. Re: Converting a file format
          Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

          Is this a DVD camcorder? Those sound like DVD files.

           

          Which version of the program are you using and on what operating system?

           

          What processor does your computer have and how much RAM?

          • 2. Re: Converting a file format
            memitch Level 1

            Hi Steve,

            It’s a Sony Handycam DVD-R. I am on Windows 7 with 6 GB Ram.

            • 3. Re: Converting a file format
              John T Smith Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              Directly editing a VOB... or Ripping a VOB to edit using a note from Jim Simon

              -http://forums.adobe.com/thread/1322647

               

              Premier Elements 11 should directly edit, but the link above does show one method of converting

              • 4. Re: Converting a file format
                Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

                As I show you in my book, if you put the DVD into your computer's DVD drive and then use Premiere Elements' Add Media/From PC DVD or DVD Camcorder, the program will "rip" the video files from the disc and then set up your project automatically to work with your video as the best settings possible.

                 

                I still don't know what processor you have or how much RAM, so I can't say if your computer is adequately powered to edit this type of video. But in my experience, Premiere Elements 11 does a pretty good job with DVD video if you use the Add Media tool to get the video from the disc to your computer.

                 

                Also, don't forget to render your timeline (press Enter) whenever you see yellow orange lines along the top of the timeline, above your clips, in Expert view.

                 

                I show you more of the basics of this program in my free 8 part Basic Training tutorial series, if you're interested.

                http://forums.adobe.com/thread/537685?tstart=30

                • 5. Re: Converting a file format
                  memitch Level 1

                  I am able to import the file through Add Media and to Render it. The problem is with the quality. The clip has strange patterns happening. This is the first time a video clip ever showed up in a VOB format. I suspect that if I could convert the file format to .mov or .mpg it would be okay. I need an explanation that could be understood by someone under 7 or over 70. Thanks. Mitch

                  • 6. Re: Converting a file format
                    Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

                    You don't need to convert the file. In fact, a VOB is an MPG, so converting one to the other is irrelevant.

                     

                    Have you ensured that your .vob is the first clip on Video 1 on your timeline? This is necessary in order for the program to properly set up your project.

                     

                    Have you output your video yet? Try using Publish & Share/Computer/AVCHD with the YouTube SD preset and then play the output video in Quicktime Player.

                     

                    Make sure you play it an 100% Actual Size, NOT full screen.

                     

                    You can also post the video to Vimeo or YouTube and post a link to it on this forum. That will give me a better idea what you mean by "The problem is with the quality. The clip has strange patterns happening. "

                    • 7. Re: Converting a file format
                      memitch Level 1

                      Thanks Steve, I published the file with AVCHD and then brought that clip in through Add Media. It worked out great. I would send you a freeze frame of the “strange patterns” but they only occurred when the video was playing. When it sopped, the screen image was fine. I don’t know if that gives you a clue as to what was happening. Anyway, thanks so much for your help. I don’t know how to reply through the thread. Best, Mitch

                      • 8. Re: Converting a file format
                        Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

                        The strange patterns you saw are likely interlacing, which has to do with the difference in the way your TV and your computer handle video.

                         

                        The AVCHD format I advised you to output is a non-interlaced format, which is why you didn't see those patterns.

                         

                        You can edit from that AVCHD file, but I wouldn't recommend it. Just edit your original VOB video.

                         

                        What matters is what format you output -- and that is based on how you plan to share your video with the world. Do you plan to post it to YouTube or Facebook? Create a DVD? Each medium has its own unique ideal output format.

                        • 9. Re: Converting a file format
                          memitch Level 1

                          Thanks Steve. I have posted my work on YouTube. If I enter it in a film festival, they’ll judge it from YouTube and if it is accepted, they require a DVD. One of my works made in Premier Elements 11 is an Official Selection of the Cape Fear Independent Film Festival screening on May 1st. (made before I started having these problems) If I edit from the VOB files and then post on YouTube will the interlacing disappear? Mitch

                          • 10. Re: Converting a file format
                            Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

                            It depends.

                             

                            Are you posting directly from Premiere Elements to YouTube using Publish & Share or are you creating a finished file and then loading that to YouTube?

                            • 11. Re: Converting a file format
                              memitch Level 1

                              Directly. Not sure what you mean by a “finished file”

                              • 12. Re: Converting a file format
                                Steve Grisetti Adobe Community Professional

                                You can post directly from Publish & Share to YouTube, Vimeo or Facebook.

                                 

                                Although some people (including me) prefer to use Publish & Share/Computer/AVCHD with the YouTube HD preset to output an MP4 of their video and then use the software on the YouTube site upload this MP4 to the site.

                                 

                                It's up to you. The results will be the same -- and your uploaded video will NOT be interlaced either way.

                                • 13. Re: Converting a file format
                                  memitch Level 1

                                  Thanks for all your help. Best, Mitch