7 Replies Latest reply on May 22, 2014 8:59 AM by rob day

    Colours screwing up in InDesign CS6

    Rhodrii

      Basically I am printing my 2nd year graphic design folio in three days and Ive got a page where the colours are screwing up. I have them in photoshop all fine in RGB, then when I save them and place in indesign the colours screw up. I know this is CYMK but it has never changed my colours so much!!

       

      Do I have to export as CYMK if I am taking it to the printers? Can't I export as RGB?

      Heres an example

       

      THE FIRST IMAGE IS THE RIGHT COLOURS. IN PHOTOSHOP

       

      THE SECOND IMAGE IS WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE IN INDESIGN. (WE'RE TALKING ABOUT THE BLUE GETTING PALER)

       

      THANKS

       

      Screen Shot 2014-05-22 at 12.18.13.png

      Screen Shot 2014-05-22 at 12.47.22.png

        • 1. Re: Colours screwing up in InDesign CS6
          John Mensinger Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          Okay well, that's not anything extreme or unexpected. You have to bear in mind that RGB isn't only a wider gamut, but its display on your computer monitor is back-lighted. InDesign is simulating CMYK output (looks like just about 100% C), and the brighter blue in your first image simply isn't available in process printing. The blue in your second image is the nearest possible. It isn't "pale;" it just isn't "luminous." It's quite literally a case of mechanical limitation. This is the difference between the additive color theory of RGB and the subtractive nature of CMYK.

          • 2. Re: Colours screwing up in InDesign CS6
            Rhodrii Level 1

            So is there any way I can replicate the colour in the first image to the second one??

            • 3. Re: Colours screwing up in InDesign CS6
              John Mensinger Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              When you need a (ink) color outside the CMYK gamut, you specify (and pay for) a spot color. In this case, I'd try Pantone 801 C, or perhaps 908 C, which is found among the "pastels and neons" swatches.

              • 4. Re: Colours screwing up in InDesign CS6
                rob day Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                Color gamuts go both ways. There are also CMYK colors that can't be displayed in an RGB color space (like 95%-100% Cyan), so when you do a typical conversion of saturated RGB blues into CMYK via the default color settings you won't get the best result. You can improve saturated cyans by converting to CMYK and making a color correction.

                 

                So the default conversion to US SWOP CMYK of the blue in your capture is something like 79|38|0|0, which eliminates a full 20% of the cyan separation and adds a lot of magenta in attempt to compensate for a darker value. You have to keep in mind that because a 90-100% cyan can't be displayed, soft proofing colors like this is impossible and you have to rely on numbers.

                 

                With a post CMYK edit you can't get some saturation back. Here at the bottom I've converted to CMYK and color corrected the blue to 100|13|0|0 again keeping in mind that because 100% cyan can't be displayed the color will likely improve on an offset press. When you make CMYK edits like this for a press you want to make sure the values output, so don't embed a profile:

                 

                Screen Shot 2014-05-22 at 11.23.32 AM.png

                • 5. Re: Colours screwing up in InDesign CS6
                  Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                  John Mensinger wrote:

                   

                  When you need a (ink) color outside the CMYK gamut, you specify (and pay for) a spot color. In this case, I'd try Pantone 801 C, or perhaps 908 C, which is found among the "pastels and neons" swatches.

                  Of course, that only works if you can print using the spot inks, which means a printing press, not what I would expect to be happening with a student portfolio. There are printers with fairly wide gamuts, though, and you might be able to get your local print shop to output this on an Epson proofer, for example, and get a lot closer than you will at the local copy shop or using the typical desktop or office color printer.

                  • 6. Re: Colours screwing up in InDesign CS6
                    John Mensinger Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                    Peter Spier wrote:

                    Of course, that only works if you can print using the spot inks, which means a printing press...

                    Yes, of course.

                    ..not what I would expect to be happening with a student portfolio.

                    Could be true. I have no preconceived notions in that area.

                    • 7. Re: Colours screwing up in InDesign CS6
                      rob day Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                      There are printers with fairly wide gamuts, though, and you might be able to get your local print shop to output this on an Epson proofer

                       

                      Right, if it's a composite printer converting to CMYK and correcting could make things worse.