9 Replies Latest reply on Jun 20, 2014 8:11 AM by Peter Spier

    Image Workflow in InDesign CC 2014?

    kcrossley Level 1

      I'm working on a 16-pg 4-color brochure that will be output as a printable PDF, which in turn will be sent to the printer.

       

      In the past, I've always converted my high-res .jpg images to tiffs before placing them in InDesign. Is that still the preferred workflow? Also, what about placed PSD files? Do the Photoshop files need to be converted to CMYK before placing them in InDesign as well? The reason I'm asking these questions is I usually receive an error message in InDesign if it has placed RGB images, but I didn't see that warning in InDesign CC 2014. And yes, my InDesign document is setup as Print. Thanks in advance for any help with this.

       

      – K

        • 1. Re: Image Workflow in InDesign CC 2014?
          Dov Isaacs Adobe Employee

          If you already have JPEG images, it buys you absolutely nothing to convert them to TIFF or PSD files for placement into InDesign. Whatever lossiness that would occur already happened by creating JPEG in the first place. Note that this doesn't mean that JPEG is a poor choice, but that it doesn't improve anything to convert the file to a lossless format unless you are planning to subsequently edit the file.

           

          No, there is no good reason to convert your RGB images to CMYK before placing the image into InDesign. InDesign can optionally convert RGB imagery to whatever CMYK color space you need for printing. However, the most reasonable and reliable place for any RGB to CMYK (or even LAB to CMYK) conversion to take place is at the RIP itself since it is only at that stage of the print production process that you definitively know what the output CMYK color space really is.

           

          If you received any “error messages” from InDesign in the past about RGB images being placed, it was likely due to having activated an InDesign profile to check for such imagery. Such a check is not on by default.

           

                    - Dov

          • 2. Re: Image Workflow in InDesign CC 2014?
            kcrossley Level 1

            Thanks for your response Dov.

             

            Okay, so moving forward I should leave the jpgs in their native format (these are us usually stock images) and let Photoshop and/or InDesign do the conversion when I output the file to a printable PDF, correct? That seems way too easy, but I like simple. Clearly, I'm behind the times in my workflow.

             

            BTW, the only reason I'm using placed PSD files in InDesign is because I probably edited the jpg in Photoshop and I may want to modify the image in the future.

            • 3. Re: Image Workflow in InDesign CC 2014?
              Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

              If you aren't doing any editing on the image, if it has an embedded profile just place it and things really are that simple. If you need to embed the profile, sharpen, or otherwise tweak the image I save as .psd or in some cases Photoshop PDF (use the .pdp extension and it will be recognized as a Photoshop file by Edit Original) and place that. I'm still old-school enough that I do my own cmyk conversions and tweak colors manually to the specific press condition for color-critical work, but for most jobs where I get an RGB photo and I don't know what the colors REALLY look like in the Real World I leave the images in RGB and export PDF/X-4 and let the RIP do the conversion.

              • 4. Re: Image Workflow in InDesign CC 2014?
                kcrossley Level 1

                How can I tell if the image has an embedded color profile?


                So basically I can bring the image into Photoshop, do any tweaking needed, and simply place the PSD (still in RGB format) in InDesign?


                Color is a real problem for me. When I'm specifying screen built solid colors I can simply use a Pantone Bridge Color Guide and set the colors manually, but for 4-color I have no idea what the printers settings are, so there's a lot of guesswork involved. Most of the time things turn out okay and I've learned to not be as critical.

                • 5. Re: Image Workflow in InDesign CC 2014?
                  John Mensinger Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                  kcrossley wrote:

                   

                  So basically I can bring the image into Photoshop, do any tweaking needed, and simply place the PSD (still in RGB format) in InDesign?

                  Yes. The real key there is to NOT re-save it as JPEG.

                  • 6. Re: Image Workflow in InDesign CC 2014?
                    Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                    If the image has an embedded profile it will show in Bridge, or the link info in ID.

                    • 7. Re: Image Workflow in InDesign CC 2014?
                      kcrossley Level 1

                      Where do I see that info in Bridge?

                      • 8. Re: Image Workflow in InDesign CC 2014?
                        kcrossley Level 1

                        I think I found it. So "Untagged" means there's no profile? And in these cases I should bring the image into Photoshop and save it as a PSD so it receives a color profile, correct? And finally, what color profile do you tend to use for 4-color sheetfed work?

                        • 9. Re: Image Workflow in InDesign CC 2014?
                          Peter Spier Most Valuable Participant (Moderator)

                          Indeed, untagged means there is no embedded profile, so you have to guess (try a few and pick the one that seems right -- sRGB, Adobe RGB and ProPhoto are the most commonly used by pros), then save with the profile embedded. For a cmyk conversion profile my printer likes GRAcol, but check with your printer. In Europe it's more common to use one of the Fogra standards.