4 Replies Latest reply on Jun 24, 2014 2:35 PM by b.hein

    black appears grey

    b.hein Level 1

      Hi,

       

      I got a new monitor today and spent the last hours googling and trying to fix this issue...no success so far

       

      When I am using 0/0/0/100 black it appears as grey. When I copy a rectangle of the same color from indesign or illustrator, which appears black there, it also turns grey after placing it into photoshop.

      If i copy a rich black, let's say 50/50/0/100, which appears totally black in illustrator and indesign, it appears as a dark purple. My old monitor, which is now the second one, is totally fine.

       

      What can I do?

       

      On both monitors I am using their manufacturers icc profiles, for software I got ECI v2 300% and sRGB running.

        • 1. Re: black appears grey
          D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          In InDesign and Illustrator there is an option to display all blacks as rich black - and this option is on by default. Photoshop doesn't have this and always displays 100K black accurately.

           

          idprefs.png

           

          50/50/0/100 would be dark purple, so again Photoshop is correct. But as long as K=100 it will be displayed as rich black in Id and Ai.

           

          inflame_media wrote:

           

          On both monitors I am using their manufacturers icc profiles

          That is never a good idea. Manufacturer profiles are usually all over the map and frequently broken. You should get a calibrator and do it properly.

          • 2. Re: black appears grey
            b.hein Level 1

            Thank you for the reply. If I understand you right the new monitor is showing the color correctly - while my old one, which shows 0/0/0/100 as dark black, isnt really correct?

            I really got used to seeing a dark black when choosing 100k or similar; Is there a way to have PS show the same dark black as ID and AI with rich black turned on?

             

            I am a bit confused. If the grey I see represents black, is there something wrong with my workflow? How am I supposed to create an almost black baground with slight lighting for example if I dont see the outcome as it is?

            Shall I use rich black or am I supposed to compose my images in RGB (where the black is displayed as dark black) and convert them into CMYK after I finished? Currently I am working directly in CMYK a lot, using a lot of black (shadowing products for print).

             

            I know, I should calibrate my screens. My Spyder somehow got lost. I'll see if I can borrow our ColorMunki from the office, thank's for the reminder.

            • 3. Re: black appears grey
              D Fosse Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              The only way to get consistency is to set ID and Ai to "Display All Blacks Accurately" - because this is the only way Photoshop knows. And then what you see is what you get.

               

              Have you looked at any printed material lately? 100K black really is dark gray, since it prints only on the black plate. The black ink really isn't all that dense. That's why you get richer blacks by adding C, M and Y in the right proportion (up to the maximum total ink coverage, known as TAC, where you get into smearing and drying issues).

               

              The point of 100K black is that it overprints CMY and you get clean, crisp text without registration issues. So if there's text it's not a good idea to work in RGB.

              • 4. Re: black appears grey
                b.hein Level 1

                The only way to get consistency is to set ID and Ai to "Display All Blacks Accurately" - because this is the only way Photoshop knows. And then what you see is what you get.

                Alright, at least now its all the same in all of the three programs.

                 


                Have you looked at any printed material lately? 100K black really is dark gray, since it prints only on the black plate. The black ink really isn't all that dense. That's why you get richer blacks by adding C, M and Y in the right proportion (up to the maximum total ink coverage, known as TAC, where you get into smearing and drying issues).

                I used 100k to do dropshadows and stuff for masked products - because that was the quickest to type or it was the default or I was lazy and uninformed - i don't know anymore. 100k always looked fine on paper, the raster is a bit wide though. Anyways, would you recommend using richer color like 40/40/40/100 in the future, whenever I need  black?

                 

                Left ist the new, right the old monitor. Just so you see what I see. I guess the good ol' DELL wasn't that bad then, at least for my measures regarding black.

                scrr.jpg