11 Replies Latest reply on May 18, 2007 4:53 PM by flarext

    Filesize [again]

    spritc
      I am posting this again. Besides the fact that it took me bloody ages to write the first time, I thought it would concern more than a few users. Maybe there's just not enough people using it yet?

      It is in response to David's article at http://www.adobe.com/devnet/captivate/articles/filesize.html. I'm just after a little more information than what he gave. If anyone think I should, or want to themselves point David to this post, please let me know. Truth is he probably doesn;t have time, but it would make quite a comprehensive list of answers for us beginners:

      1. Minimize file size by reducing the recording area in Captivate:

      Sure, but what is the relationship between recording area and file size? I know there's a relationship between total number of pixels x bytes per pixel, but there must be more to it than that.

      2. Reduce the amount of background noise;

      OK - easily done.

      3. Reduce the color gradients in your recording area:

      How much does this really affect the final size? Is it closer to .05% reduction or 50% reduction? I can see how this may be appropriate for simple slideshows, but what if the animations are graphically intensive, do the color gradients really matter then? Is this point outdated with the increasing complexity of animations?

      4. When recording in "Full Motion" format, Captivate converts the recording from AVI format to static screen shots. This increases the overall file size more than a traditional recording:

      Again, in producing a thoroughly enthralling animation, with 3D graphics and voiceovers, etc, full motion is a necessity. If the Full Motion Recording options (which is only briefly mentioned in the demonstration) are altered, is there a proven relationship between all the settings (Smoother Movie/Video Quality/Video Color Mode) and the final size of that recording?

      5. Remove any extra slides that do not add any value to the presentation:

      Sounds like a sensible idea. Is there anywhere where we can see the size of an actual slide?

      6. If you insert large images, expect your Captivate file size to grow more than if you insert small images:

      Like point 1, what's the magic formula? Even a ballpark figure would help. David mentions SWF files and the file size should increase only by about the same amount as the inserted SWF file. That's good stuff - a tangible amount.

      7. On the Start and End tab:

      Okay, but I'm definitely going to need those. Again is there anywhere where we can find out how big they are?

      8. Advanced movie compression: Select this option to compress slide data shared between slides, thereby reducing overall file size:

      Sweet, consider it done. How much did it just save me?

      9. Compress compiled SWF file: Do not deselect this option.

      I won't. In fact I am not sure why it's even an option!

      10. Include Breeze metadata: This option, which is selected by default, increases the size of the project. If you are not going to use the project with Macromedia Breeze, deselect the option to decrease the size of the finished project file (SWF). However, if there is the possibility that the output file (SWF) may be used in Breeze, it is best to select this option.

      Bit of a crap shoot at this stage. If I knew just how much I was saving in the file size, I would be better informed to know whether to include it or not.

      11. 508 compliance: Publishing 508-compliant output increases your file size. If audience analysis concludes that are no learners with disabilities that need to access your content—or if you are not otherwise required to comply with Section 508 government regulations—you can safely turn off 508 support.

      C'mon sevens! Again if only I knew the real impact on my filesize, I would know whether to just leave it checked, just in case it will one day be needed.

      12. Frames per second: The default setting is 30 Flash frames per second (fps) and this is appropriate in most cases. Note: Decreasing the number of frames per second does not significantly decrease the size of your Captivate project and therefore is not recommended. For example, decreasing the fps rate by half does not halve the file size. Also, reducing the fame rate of Captivate is not the same as reducing the frame rate of an AVI. Lowering the frame rate of an AVI removes static images from the file, which reduces its size. Removing a single frame from a Captivate project where no change takes place does not reduce the file size.

      Mine defaults to 10 fps, is that bad? Now I'm confused! So what is the best frame rate, and just how much does it reduce the file size when changed?

      13. Movie background color: Depending upon the type of slide and how you took screen shots, the background color might not appear on all slides. Double-click the color box to open the color picker, and select a new color. Remember that using a bright background color will increase the file size.

      Does this ~really~ matter if I have 3D Virtual models and constant audio? Or is it like worrying about if the temperature in Antarctica is 70 below or 71 below?

      14. JPEG image quality: Adjust this setting depending upon the images used in your movie. Lowering your image quality to as low as 50% (from the default 75%) is often not noticeable to the naked eye. Higher percentage values allow for very high quality images. Of course, this also increases file size.

      Okay, but numbers would be good again.

      15. Play tap audio for recorded typing when movie is generated: This option plays tapping sounds in the final movie whenever keys are pressed during recording. Including this option adds a small audio file to your project and does increase the file size, but only by a small amount.

      No sure how much they'll hear the taps with me talking over them the whole way through it, but I can turn them off. I think a lot of people finding them slightly annoying anyway, but how much did I just gain with that happy move?

      16. Including a playback control bar increases the file size by a small amount. If your users do not need a playback control—as is often the case with simulations and quizzes—select None from the menu.

      Well they are going to need to play these things back somehow, but I may have that created separately. What's the average size of a playback control bar anyway? And how does You Tube get away with all this stuff?


      I am not trying to be cynical, I'm really not, but I am surprised that this has been raised and addressed by Macromedia/Adobe already. I would assume that as users develop more engaging and interactive content, these will become more important. Is there any hope or support for someone like myself, who wants to know every shortcut there is in order to deliver the best possible animations?

      As always, any help from any of the experts here, would be gratefully received!

      Thanks and I look forward to your replies.

      Cheers,
      spritc.
        • 1. Re: Filesize [again]
          Captiv8r Adobe Community Professional & MVP
          Hi spritc

          Maybe there's just not enough people using it yet?

          I seriously doubt this is the case. There are more and more folks using Captivate each day. Just based on the forum activity alone, we are seeing what I feel is a pretty significant and growing user base. I say this because I conduct Captivate classes. During each class I mention the Adobe support forums. And I'm totally shocked at the fact that almost nobody so far has found/used them! This tells me that even though I'm seeing an increase in new users here, there are a vast amount that haven't yet discovered this area.

          ...If anyone think I should, or want to themselves point David to this post...

          Pointing David to this post won't do anything. Fact is, he has moved on and now works for the company that has Articulate.

          1. Minimize file size by reducing the recording area in Captivate:

          Sure, but what is the relationship between recording area and file size? I know there's a relationship between total number of pixels x bytes per pixel, but there must be more to it than that.


          Think about it this way. If I create a simple bitmap image using Microsoft Paint, and I size that image to be 640 pixels wide by 480 pixels tall, I've created something that uses 307,200 pixels. If I did the same thing at 1024 pixels wide by 768 pixels tall, that number increases to 786,432. That's a significant difference. I just created a stark white image at each of those resolutions and saw the 640x480 resulted in a file sized at 901 kb. The same file at 1024x768 resulted in 2,305 kb. So hopefully this can better illustrate why this bit is important. Probably the single most important factor to consider.

          5. Remove any extra slides that do not add any value to the presentation:

          Sounds like a sensible idea. Is there anywhere where we can see the size of an actual slide?


          Indeed there is. If you click View > Bandwidth Analysis... you should see a dialog labeled Bandwidth Monitor. This dialog has three tabs. One tab (normally the one presented as the default tab) is labeled Slide Summary. I believe this tab has the information you are seeking.

          6. If you insert large images, expect your Captivate file size to grow more than if you insert small images:

          Like point 1, what's the magic formula? Even a ballpark figure would help. David mentions SWF files and the file size should increase only by about the same amount as the inserted SWF file. That's good stuff - a tangible amount.


          I'm unaware of any "magic formula" here. But consider what I offered in the first bit where I advised of the pixel/resolution/end resulting size.

          7. On the Start and End tab:

          Okay, but I'm definitely going to need those. Again is there anywhere where we can find out how big they are?


          This one looks like something got lost during copy/paste. I'm not sure what you are looking for here.

          8. Advanced movie compression: Select this option to compress slide data shared between slides, thereby reducing overall file size:

          Sweet, consider it done. How much did it just save me?


          Well, I'm guessing the savings would vary from project to project. For example, if your entire movie consisted of recording mostly the same application and not much is changing from screen to screen save mouse movement and captions, the savings could be significant. But if the movie is constantly changing, the savings may be negligible at best. In other words, your mileage may vary. However, your question of exactly how much does it save me strikes me as odd. I would think the fact you are reading the article is an indication that you apparently have some concerns with regards to file sizes. So I'm confused as to why you want to know the exact amount it will save you. Even if it's a small amount, it's better than nothing.

          9. Compress compiled SWF file: Do not deselect this option.

          I won't. In fact I am not sure why it's even an option!


          I've seen posts where projects refuse to compile. DE-selecting these options can help in these cases because something about the mix of elements in those projects is causing Captivate to gag.

          10. Include Breeze metadata: This option, which is selected by default, increases the size of the project. If you are not going to use the project with Macromedia Breeze, deselect the option to decrease the size of the finished project file (SWF). However, if there is the possibility that the output file (SWF) may be used in Breeze, it is best to select this option.

          Bit of a crap shoot at this stage. If I knew just how much I was saving in the file size, I would be better informed to know whether to include it or not.


          I think the larger question with this one is to ask: Are you using Breeze? If no, then turn it off. If yes, leave it selected.

          11. 508 compliance: Publishing 508-compliant output increases your file size. If audience analysis concludes that are no learners with disabilities that need to access your content—or if you are not otherwise required to comply with Section 508 government regulations—you can safely turn off 508 support.

          C'mon sevens! Again if only I knew the real impact on my filesize, I would know whether to just leave it checked, just in case it will one day be needed.


          Again, the larger question here is Are you creating output that needs to be 508 compliant? If not, turn it off. If so, leave it selected. However, making a project 508 compliant involves much much more than simply selecting this check box and calling it good.

          12. Frames per second: The default setting is 30 Flash frames per second (fps) and this is appropriate in most cases. Note: Decreasing the number of frames per second does not significantly decrease the size of your Captivate project and therefore is not recommended. For example, decreasing the fps rate by half does not halve the file size. Also, reducing the fame rate of Captivate is not the same as reducing the frame rate of an AVI. Lowering the frame rate of an AVI removes static images from the file, which reduces its size. Removing a single frame from a Captivate project where no change takes place does not reduce the file size.

          Mine defaults to 10 fps, is that bad? Now I'm confused! So what is the best frame rate, and just how much does it reduce the file size when changed?


          The default frame rate for Captivate is 30 Frames per second. The fact yours is 10 indicates that at some point you elected to change it. Not necessarily bad, but could result in a jerkier movie. As Captivate defaults to 30, I'm going to crawl out here on this shaky limb and suggest that it's probably what the developers feel is the "best".

          13. Movie background color: Depending upon the type of slide and how you took screen shots, the background color might not appear on all slides. Double-click the color box to open the color picker, and select a new color. Remember that using a bright background color will increase the file size.

          Does this ~really~ matter if I have 3D Virtual models and constant audio? Or is it like worrying about if the temperature in Antarctica is 70 below or 71 below?


          Most of the time it's like your Antarctica analogy. This is because most of the time we are recording applications that consume the entire recording area. I think what David means here is that if you have perhaps a blank movie, if you have a different color used on each slide, the size will increase as a result.

          I'm skipping the rest of this to get to something you later say:

          I am not trying to be cynical, I'm really not, but I am surprised that this has been raised and addressed by Macromedia/Adobe already. I would assume that as users develop more engaging and interactive content, these will become more important. Is there any hope or support for someone like myself, who wants to know every shortcut there is in order to deliver the best possible animations?

          Sorry, but the tenor of your responses certainly exude a cynical view. Keep in mind that the only player here is now Adobe. They swallowed Macromedia, so it is no more.

          I think David's document was intended to be used in order to know which areas you should look at or consider when you are concerned about file size. It's intended to be a list of places to possibly make tweaks.

          The bottom line is that making all or some of the changes recommended may help dramatically for one type of project and maybe not at all for other types. As Captivate is an application that can be used to create almost anything, it's a bit like asking Kodak just why their digital cameras include the leaves on the trees when you take the picture. After all, almost everyone is taking pictures these days and not everyone wants leaves in their pictures.

          Sincerely... Rick
          • 2. Re: Filesize [again]
            spritc Level 1
            Hi Rick

            Thanks for your reply and your help. Sorry if I came across as cynical, maybe I am a little frustrated. But I am also thoroughly enjoying the experience of learning Captivate. It is a great tool that does a lot, I just wish it could do everything ~I~ want! ;-)

            You're right, I am concerned with filesize. Truth is I hope to make some pretty decent animations with Captivate. They will consist of captured screen recordings mixed in with additional animations like the one shown at http://www.erain.com/products/plug-ins/tour/maxDefault.asp. I need to develop lessons that are about 30-40 minutes long. So I am anticipating huge files, and need to know the best way to reduce their filesize.

            So now I will:

            1. Reduce the recording area in Captivate (to 800x600);
            2. Reduce the amount of background noise;
            3. Reduce the color gradients in my recording area;
            4. Record in "Full Motion" format as less as possible;
            5. Remove any extra slides that do not add any value to the presentation;
            6. Be conscientious when inserting images (and other files);
            7. Include the Start and End tab and deal with the consequences;
            8. Select Advanced movie compression to compress slide data shared between slides;
            9. Will not deselect 'Compress compiled SWF file' and know what to do if it doesn't compile;
            10. Will not include Include Breeze metadata, 'cause I don't need it!;
            11. Will not include 508 compliance for the same reasons;
            12. Keep my frames per second to 30 and see how it looks. May be tempted to lower it and check results;
            13. Keep the Movie background color the same;
            14. JPEG image quality with due caution and check the results;
            15. Will turn off the tapping sound and hope that cmpensate for the huge amunt of audio I will add to it!

            Maybe (probably) I am in for a huge shock during this experience? I am anticipating each 30-40 minute lesson to be about 100-160Mb each. Do you think that is way off the mark? Any "magic formulas"?;-)

            Thanks again for your response - as you can tell, I have a long way to go, but it's a journey right? Not a destination.

            Cheers,
            spritc.
            • 3. Re: Filesize [again]
              rbLearning Level 1
              Spritc --
              I hate to add to the list, but my gut feeling is that you're in for lots of headaches even with attention to all 15 of the items you listed -- unless you break up your topics into discrete little movies. Our team produces content with a runtime of about 20 minutes, and it's made up of anywhere from 6 to 20 "pages" (separate Captivate movies) that are played in sequence. We use a custom-built player that we developed in Flash, but something similar could be done by just "jumping" at the end of each movie to the next one in the sequence.

              Really, it wouldn't matter what tool you're using -- putting 30 or 40 minutes of content into a single file is just asking for trouble in my opinion. Maybe you're not contemplating that, but the suggestion that you project your lesson to be 100-160MB has me worried.

              You already know about the difficulties of large source files, but do you also know that Captivate 2's source files "bloat" exponentially as you work? The more you edit a file, the bigger it becomes. You have just a little bit of control over that, but much of it "just happens." While you've probably projected the "100-160MB" file size based on optimizations you're working toward, I suspect you'll miss the mark dramatically once you make a couple of edit passes through the course. The more you edit, the bigger the file gets -- even if you don't add/delete images.

              My suggestion? Hang on to your optimism for producing outstanding content, but start studying your options now for splitting and sequencing the content as a series of smaller files. You'll thank (me and) yourself later!
              • 4. Re: Filesize [again]
                spritc Level 1
                Hi rbLearning,

                Your response was exactly the type I was hoping to provoke. It's the kind of key information that I need. Optimism is great right up until it bites you in the butt. The fact is that I ~do~ need to create 30-40 minutes tutorials. So there's no getting away from that, but I am quite happy to split the movies up into smaller ones and half expected that to be the case.

                I was unaware that files bloat so dramatically and am very concerned about it. It almost sounds like a bug to me. Would you agree? If so, I wonder if we can expect to see a fix in the future? Do Adobe personnel respond here?

                Can you please calrify what file grows - is it the woorking file, or the resultant Flash file (or maybe both)?. And would you hazard a guess as to what size my files may be, for that length of time?

                I think I will have the means to have the movies pre-load and link togethr rather seamlessly, so it looks like multiple smaller movies are the way to go, but do you think it will really make much of a difference, especailly if I have to update them on an ongoing basis?

                BTW - I thank you now ~and~ I'll thank you again later.

                Cheers,
                spritc.
                • 5. Re: Filesize [again]
                  rbLearning Level 1
                  OK, Spritc -- here's some details of one of our typical projects:

                  Runtime: 20mins, fully-narrated software simulation
                  Pages (individual Captivate projects): 15
                  Dimension: 800 x 600
                  Average SWF size: 621KB (Min: 300KB, Max: 982KB)
                  Total of 15 SWFs: 8,198 KB
                  Average .CP (source) size: 8,543KB (Min: 3,792, Max: 15,649)
                  Total of 15 .CP files: 113,703KB

                  SOURCE FILE BLOAT
                  The 'bloat' of source files is most definitely a bug, or at least the result of a design flaw that has more impact on users than Adobe engineers thought it would. The resultant SWF does not -generally- bloat appreciatively, though I have seen a few random situations where the SWF doesn't always seem to shrink as much as expected after some content is edited out of the presentation.

                  As for a fix, it seems safe to say now that Adobe won't likely be releasing a fix for this problem prior to releasing the next version of Captivate. Adobe does not regularly monitor these forums, so your only recourse is to post a message using their Bug Report form and/or Wish List form. Despite being told often that they screen every one of those submissions, don't expect to personally hear back from them.

                  COMPRESSION TIPS
                  My team constantly strives for the smallest SWF files, and the two things that seem to work best for us are:

                  IMAGES...
                  If you create/edit graphics outside of Captivate, bring them back in as 24-bit Windows BMP files instead of JPG, GIF, or PNG. The BMP files are uncompressed, and Captivate seems to do the best job of compression when starting with uncompressed images. The fewer colors there are in your image, the greater the compression and the smaller your SWF will be.

                  AUDIO...
                  Our audio is provided by a sound studio as 96kbps, 44kHz, mono MP3 files. When we publish our Captivate projects, we set the 'Audio Settings' panel to 'Custom Bitrate' of 32kbps, 'Encoding Frequency' to 22.050 KHz, and then drag the 'Encoding Speed' slider all the way to the left (to '0'). The narrator is female, and her voice is still very clean even with extreme compression.

                  CONCLUSION
                  This sample project is just 20 minutes long, and was not edited AT ALL due to the fact that it was a reproduction of something we did in another tool some time ago -- we "got it right" the first time.

                  The total source of this 20-min project is 113MB, so for a 40-minute project you can expect something close to 226MB. With lots of editing and the resultant file bloat, I wouldn't be surprised to hear that your source files end up totalling 300-500MB.

                  With the very best compression, the combined total of your SWF files may be roughly 16-18MB.

                  MAINTAINABILITY
                  You asked whether using smaller movies makes much of a difference if you have to update them "on an ongoing basis." From the perspective of maintenance, smaller movies do make a lot of sense to me. Opening, editing, saving, and publishing all works faster and more reliably on smaller files, plus it's just much easier to find what you need if there's only 20-30 slides per Captivate file. Something else to consider is that, like many other applications, Captivate will sometimes (though rarely) corrupt a source file to the point that it's entirely unrecoverable. By spreading your content across multiple files, you're less likely to end up in a situation where you lose the source of a 40-minute project that took you 4 weeks to build. (It's much better to lose 1-3 minutes instead of the whole shebang!)

                  Finally, if you're updating the content at regular intervals, it seems reasonable to think that specific sections will be updated more often than others. There are some workarounds for the source file bloat issue, and although they're cumbersome and problematic, you can more easily strip the bloat out of a few "chunks" without messing up the whole project if it goes badly.

                  One of these days I'd like to get around to publishing a white paper on my team's workflow and optimization techniques, but we're so busy pushing out the content that I never find the time. Perhaps the statistics and tips I've listed here will help you make some prudent decisions, nonetheless.

                  Best of luck!
                  • 6. Re: Filesize [again]
                    spritc Level 1
                    rbLearning, this is pure gold. Thanks again for answering my questions so succinctly.

                    I especially take value in your comments about images (would never have guessed a 24-bit Windows BMP file would have been the best choice) and the audio settings that I'll need to record for the future when I better understand them.

                    Also having huge working files is not a concern for me, so it is a relief to see that the resultant swf's are just 16-18Mb. Seriously I was considering these to be 100-150Mb, which would have been very off putting for anyone wanting to download them! Especially since I am about to create 60-120 of them!

                    If you have any further insights to share, I would love to hear them. A whitepaper would be so beneficial to the general Captivate public. It's a crying shame Adobe aren't a little more vigilant in helping their users with problems and bugs. I would also like to see some of your work, would you be willing to provide links to your site, either here or by private message? I think I could learn a lot from you and hopefully could repay the favor as I commit myself to creating high quality Captivate movies for the next few years.

                    Looking forward to hearing from you.

                    Cheers,
                    spritc.
                    • 7. Re: Filesize [again]
                      rbLearning Level 1
                      Thank you, Spritc. I would love to share samples of my work, but have an unusually stringent non-disclosure situation with this client. This healthcare-related (Electronic Health Record) application is staunchly protected by the vendor. As rediculous as it seems, they allow only licensed software users to even see screenshots of the application.

                      I've considered using the same techniques to create demos of our work using just some public domain application, but never seem to find the time. If and when I get to it, I'll try to make it available here.
                      • 8. Re: Filesize [again]
                        flarext
                        Hi spritc & rblearning,

                        Regarding source filesize bloat, I have seen this happen while working on my Captivate files, but if I follow a couple simple steps I am seeing that I can reduce the bloat back down. Periodically while working on a project I do a "Save As" on the file - this reduces the bloat. After doing a Save As operation on the file, I immediately close the file before making any new changes. At this point, Captivate goes through a close out process on the file that further reduces the file size (about 300 - 500K for me).

                        Like rblearning, I am not noticing the source filesize bloat affect the actual published SWF file size.

                        I am not sure this is an actual bug since many multimedia applications do the exact same thing on files while working on them. Flash, Director, and Authorware all add to the file size even if only making very minor changes or after deleting elements. What those programs do have that is different is a "Save and Compact" feature that you can use to reorder the data in the file to optimize it and discard data that is no longer needed (such as pointers to deleted objects and the undo stack). Fortunately, running Save As on a file seems to give the same results as the Save and Compact feature that other programs have. So, I believe what Captivate needs is a Save and Compact feature to make this operational step more apparent to developers.

                        IHTH

                        Best wishes,
                        Aaron
                        • 9. Re: Filesize [again]
                          rbLearning Level 1
                          Aaron, it's good to hear about positive experiences.

                          The source file bloat is indeed a common thing to see in most applications, and especially in multimedia applications. The age-old "Save As" (or "Save and Compact") technique is a critical step in ensuring that your source file stays small, clean, and uncorrupted.

                          However, Captivate 2 does not play along the same lines. Perhaps it was meant to and certainly should, but it doesn't. Source files that start out at 2-5MB can easily grow to 10...15...20MB+ if the file undergoes a long string of edits.

                          Nonetheless, your advice to periodially do a "Save As" is still a good practice. The disappointment, however, (and the crux of the problem) is that compacting a 20MB source file by 300-500K is dismal. If one has the time to mess with the "copy-and-paste" dance to move slides into a blank project, seeing that 20MB shrink back down to maybe 5MB is a much more satisfying result -- and rather enlightening.

                          Captivate is a particularly "approachable" tool for folks who haven't much experience in producing multimedia, so it's reasonable to assume that a sizable portion of the user base doesn't know about compacting their files -- thus the reason for SO many ongoing complaints about file bloat. However, there are also many of us with as much as 15 years of experience who know what to expect and how to manage it -- and Captivate's not fitting the mold.

                          As was the case in Captivate 1, something's still amiss in Captivate 2's asset management and source compaction. But, given that it wasn't a Macromedia product to begin with, it doesn't work like a Macromedia product -- and until it's been around long enough and selling strongly enough for Adobe to entirely rebuild it, Captivate won't even work like an Adobe product.

                          I'll be happily surprised if it's corrected in the next release.
                          • 10. Re: Filesize [again]
                            spritc Level 1
                            Thanks Aaron and rbLearning

                            I will try the Save As trick and see if it makes a difference. File bloat is not much of an issue for me, it's easy to buy more hard disk space. What really worries me is the resulting files that my users will need to download from the net, and it seems like those are relatively small by today's standards. Another concern is how well Captivate can handle long movies. As a test I tried copying a handful of slides, and when it got over the 200 mark somewhere, Captivate locked up for good. A strategy of playing multiple animations *definitely* will need to be developed, I just hope it doesn't affect the end user too much.

                            Your insight is very interesting to me rbLearning - it gives me a good gauge of where Captivate stands and that in itself answers many of my questions. I'd still love to see some of your work. Is there anywhere where we can view each others work? Is there a community gallery?

                            And may I ask another newbie question? What frame rate do you use for your movies? I assume this depends on the final output - my work will be delivered online, is there a recommended fps for content viewed over the net?

                            Thanks again.

                            Cheers,
                            spritc.

                            • 11. Re: Filesize [again]
                              flarext Level 1
                              Hi rblearning,

                              Thank you for clarifying the source file size bloat issue that you were describing. I am seeing that if I copy the slides to a new file, the new file is significantly smaller after saving. In my quick tests yesterday, I would lose about 3 MBs off files that averaged 5-6 MBs. These new files produced the same size published SWF for me.

                              In my developing with Captivate 2, once this bloat happens I am not seeing it continue to bloat any larger than this roughly 3 MB bloat size (unless adding elements of course). Perhaps my frequent Save As steps and my closing of the file right after saving are keeping additional bloat from happening.

                              Thank you for the tip. Luckily, it is not negatively affecting my output and overall experience with Captivate, but I do appreciate knowing optimization tips, and potential issues under the hood with the application.

                              Best wishes,
                              Aaron