9 Replies Latest reply on May 1, 2007 6:32 PM by RobWellington

    Converting CD-ROM built using Director for use on Web

    wyclef
      Hey, I've been handed a CD-ROM with lots of external videos and media and asked to put it on the web. What's involved in doing this? Is it as simple as exporting for shockwave or do I have to compress all the videos down? Some advice on how to proceed with a project like this would be appreciated. Thanks.
        • 1. Re: Converting CD-ROM built using Director for use on Web
          Level 7
          Hi Wyclef,

          I had a similar project not too long ago. In mine, the video for the CD version was
          MPEG-1. In the web version, I converted them all to Flash Video FLVs read by
          Director through a swf. You can create these with Flash and you can choose your own
          control bar from various templates. I needed a wait until end of video behavior
          which was slightly tricky as it neede some coding in the SWF file.

          The only other change I need in my application was to change 'go to movie'
          statements to 'gotoNetMovie'.

          Once the above was all done, just converted to Shockwave.

          You may want to adjust some of the comprewssion settings - liek JPG quality for
          images.

          Hope that helps.

          regards
          Dean

          Director Lecturer / Consultant / Director Enthusiast
          http://www.fbe.unsw.edu.au/learning/director
          http://www.multimediacreative.com.au
          email: d.utian@unsw.edu.au



          • 2. Re: Converting CD-ROM built using Director for use on Web
            Level 7
            It really depends on what is going on in your projector. If you use a
            lot of xtras, then things might get real complicated, since not all of
            them will be safe for shockwave. Any command that can affect the users
            hard drive (like BudAPI or FileIO among others) will not work in
            Shockwave for security reasons. And some xtras have requirements of
            putting some of the xtra files on a server. It completely depends on
            which ones you use.

            If you don't use any non-Shockwave-safe xtras, then it is usually very
            straightforward. Publish your movie as both HTML and Shockwave and
            upload those two files (along with any external media like movies) to
            your web server.

            If you notice a big lag when the movies are starting, then you may very
            well want to look into changing some settings on your video. As Dean
            said, flv video inside a swf wrapper is a very good alternative. You
            get very good quality with very small filesizes, and I believe the video
            streams, so it will start with much less lag. If you do not have Flash
            available, then you can use something like Quicktime Pro to save out the
            video with a lower frame rate or a smaller height/width. Quicktime
            video can stream if you have a streaming server, if not, you can make
            the files small enough that the lag is not too bad.
            • 3. Converting CD-ROM built using Director for use on Web
              wyclef Level 1
              ok, so there are basically a couple options...the simplest one being to just compres the video down more and export for shockwave player and a more logical approach to convert to flv inside swf wrapper. With the simplest approach, how much would you estimate charging for something like that or how much time? I have to give an over the thumb number and am having trouble estimating my time. There are 16 external .mov videos totalling 480mb.
              • 4. Re: Converting CD-ROM built using Director for use on   Web
                Level 7
                I believe that talk of dollar amounts is against the rules of this
                forum, so I'll limit my response to time. Charge whatever your normal
                hourly rate is, or however much you feel is correct. Or however much
                your employer is willing to pay.

                Anyway, simply recompressing the video is pretty easy. You don't seem
                to have too many videos to do, and it shouldn't take more than a few
                hours. The real time-consuming part of this will be testing. You may be
                lucky and your 1st recompress looks perfect and works great online.
                More likely, you will need to do it a few times with a few different
                data rates or codecs and see which ones work better than others- quality
                vs file size vs frame rate, etc. If you have never done this sort of
                thing before, then budget enough time to figure out the software
                options, research data rates and codecs, and otherwise get yourself up
                to speed.

                There are free programs to do the compression for you, and there are for
                pay programs that often offer better results. Quicktime Pro (I think
                it's about $30 to license) will do most of what you need. It is what I
                generally use. Sorensen Squeeze is an industry standard that offers
                very good quality and compression. There are loads more out there. 3ivx
                is one that I have not used personally, but have heard good things
                about. The encoder costs about $20.

                Good luck!
                • 5. Re: Converting CD-ROM built using Director for use onWeb
                  Level 7
                  Hi,

                  Quoting is always an estimate of the amount of time you think it will take
                  multiplied by the rate you feel comfortable working at. If you're doing something
                  new, it's always good to build in an extra testing/contingency amount to cover
                  things that may take longer than expected. I find with most projects, things
                  typically take much longer than expected.

                  Another thing you could do is do a test with converting one video and see how it
                  works online. That may give you an idea of what's involved and the time it takes.

                  When you first mentioned the project, I did not consider the use of Xtras like
                  FileIO, Buddy or others that won't work in Shockwave and sao would ahve to be taken
                  out or rewritten. My CD video to web project was very simple. The bulk of the
                  conversation took 2 days. The longer bits were the building of the FLV SWF player
                  and testing. I just decided that FLV would be the best video format to use. It is
                  easy to create, and works well on the web.

                  If you'd like more advice to compare what I did with your project, feel free to
                  email me directly.

                  Hope that helps.

                  regards
                  Dean

                  Director Lecturer / Consultant / Director Enthusiast
                  http://www.fbe.unsw.edu.au/learning/director
                  http://www.multimediacreative.com.au
                  email: d.utian@unsw.edu.au


                  • 6. Re: Converting CD-ROM built using Director for use onWeb
                    wyclef Level 1
                    Ok, I just checked out the 'Extras' folder and here are the extras listed.

                    Buddy API Xtra
                    Font Asset PPC
                    Font Xtra PPC
                    InetURL PPC Xtra
                    NetFile PPC Xtra
                    NetLingo PPC Xtra
                    Quicktime6 Asset
                    Sound Control
                    TextAssett PPC
                    TextXtra PPC
                    • 7. Re: Converting CD-ROM built using Director for use onWeb
                      Level 7
                      Those will all be fine with the exception of BuddyAPI. Look through
                      your scripts and see what BuddyAPI is used for. Those functions will
                      fail in Shockwave. No way around it. You may be able to substitute
                      shockwave safe calls for some of them, or you may have to remove that
                      functionality entirely.
                      • 8. Re: Converting CD-ROM built using Director for use onWeb
                        Level 7
                        As Mike mentioned, Buddy API won't work in Shockwave. mnay CD-ROMs use Buddy
                        API for a single function like opening a PDF in its associate program. If this
                        is the case with your application, you could just link to the PDF in the same
                        way as you would to a URL and it would open fine. Best to check what is
                        actually being used in Buddy API with your application.

                        regards
                        Dean

                        Director Lecturer / Consultant / Director Enthusiast
                        http://www.fbe.unsw.edu.au/learning/director
                        http://www.multimediacreative.com.au
                        email: d.utian@unsw.edu.au


                        • 9. Re: Converting CD-ROM built using Director for use on Web
                          RobWellington Level 1
                          I am converting a large CD-ROM project to web delivery right now. It has a lot of Quicktime movies which I just compressed harder with the new web codecs (can't tell the dif and 1/6th the size). Works fine.

                          I am using:
                          _movie.preLoadNetThing() with moviePath() in one frame

                          and then kept checking with
                          getStreamStatus()
                          this also has info in it you can use for user loading info like % downloaded, etc.

                          then U load the file into a QT member for display with:
                          member().fileName

                          There's a fair amount in the newsgroups on how to do this but I still found it tricky. The most buried essential bit of info was that the filename and subdirectory must be all lower case. That had me going around in circles for 2 days!

                          the FLVs are probably simpler but if you can't do that try this.