2 Replies Latest reply on Jul 30, 2014 3:31 PM by Test Screen Name

    Reverse profile for sRGB?

    IdamIndia Level 1

      I realised that the color photos I work on (on my color calibrated system) look different to people on their monitors (most viewers/users are not using calibrated monitors).

       

      Ok, first let me clarify, that I am using calibration not for web view but for my prints to look as I expect them.

      That is what brings up this question - so for web view to look like they look on calibrated monitors, what should be done?

      1. Simply tag with sRGB

      2. Convert to sRGB (for browsers that don't respect profiles)

      3. 1 or 2 will not work. A "reverse" profile is needed (?)

       

      Goal: Make the colors as they appear on a profiled monitor to look the same on a non-calibrated monitor. this may mean two separate images?

       

      Example: I order a "blue" shirt from Amazon, it turned out to be a very different color!

      What is better for online shopping? I figured, stores don't really bother, and they are addressing masses with sRGB. Even then, using a calibrated monitor for online purchase, will be a bad idea. Or not?

        • 1. Re: Reverse profile for sRGB?
          Level 5

          Nikhil Varma wrote:

           

          …Goal: Make the colors as they appear on a profiled monitor to look the same on a non-calibrated monitor…

           

          That will never happen, ever. You have no control of what your images look like on the uncalibrated monitors of 98% of web surfers. None.

           

          The solution is very simple:  Convert (a copy) of your images to sRGB, and make sure you embed the sRGB profile when you save the PNG or JPEG image.

           

          This is most easily, safely and speedily done if you use "Save for Web", making sure the Embed Document Profile" is checked in the "Save for Web" dialog box.

          • 2. Re: Reverse profile for sRGB?
            Test Screen Name Most Valuable Participant

            There is no way that using a calibrated monitor can be a bad idea.  Your question seems to suggest there are only two colour schemes on monitors: calibrated and non-calibrated. While actually the non-calibrated monitors can do anything and be all different.