8 Replies Latest reply: Jul 25, 2014 4:54 PM by si-boneGFX RSS

    How to reinstall a corrupt, third-party plugin?

    si-boneGFX Community Member

      This is a multi-level issue.

      After purchasing and installing Recosoft PDF2ID (a very useful and clever plugin that allows a user to open PDFs right into InDesign), I noticed that InDesign would hang on Quit. Becasue this hang (and my subsequent force-quite maneuvers) became the norm, I decided to disable PDF2ID, the one third party plugin I had added to ID, using the "Adobe Exchange Manager".

       

      After I did that, "magically", ID resumed it's normal quit process; in other words, no more hanging but just a simple, happy and definitely terminal Quit.

       

      I contacted Recosoft and they replied " We have tens of thousands of PDF2ID installations (amongst various users) and this is a first". So, in other words, I should not have an issue myself because other users do not. That's logical, right?

       

      I then decided to enable PDF2ID once more just so I could obtain some sort of crash log on Quit; something I could send Recosoft for them to examine and possibly find the problem.

       

      When I did enable the plugin again (Exchange screen below, last item enabled), I got a "Startup Alert" -also attached.

      Only one time, the plugin loaded and, as expected, ID hang on Quit.

      After that I could not get the plugin to load again (but got more "Startup Alerts").

       

      I emailed Recosoft again and send them the Force-Quit log. they told me that they saw no issues and, furthermore, they added "You should contact the Adobe Exchange store to download it and install it again.".

      I did.

      After spending 2 useless hours with Adobe on the phone, they told me (in an email I asked them to send me) that "The plugin is from Recosoft & not from Adobe, we have helped you [not true at all] with the installation & activation of the plugin but we cannot help you with the usage of the plugin." I never asked them to help me with the usage of the plugin. I asked them to help me reinstall a plugin that I had purchased through Adobe Exchange, a function that apparently Exchange cannot perform.


      So, I purchased a plugin using Adobe Exchange. The plugin somehow went bad and impairs the normal functioning (quit, to be precise) of InDesign. Recosoft won't help because I bought their plugin through Adobe Exchange and Adobe won't help either (but is happy to send me an email with a lie embedded in it) because it is not their plugin ... Who should I call now? Apple because I'm using a Mac? The manufacturer of the chair where I sit while I work?

       

      Maybe they are the ones who are supposed to help me get a replacement plugin installed. You tell me.

       

      Thank you.

       

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        • 1. Re: How to reinstall a corrupt, third-party plugin?
          P Spier CommunityMVP

          I've never used either the exchange or the plugin in question, but it seems to me that when you bout it you should have downloaded the plugin installer, quite possibly a .zxp file. You should look for the plugin installer, then just choose the Install button on the top of the extension manager, point to the installer and go. It will overwrite the old version.

          • 2. Re: How to reinstall a corrupt, third-party plugin?
            si-boneGFX Community Member

            Thank you Peter. I have found the plugin file and it is nested deep into the invisible user's library folder ... not a very "intuitive" place where to look. The problem is that that very file installs a plugin that causes issues with InDesign; in other words, that installer installs a bad file. But, wait, how can that be? According to Recosoft that never happens. So, my question is: What workaround to replace a purchased, yet bad (possibly corrupt) plugin, made by a thrir-party does Adobe Exchange offer?

            • 3. Re: How to reinstall a corrupt, third-party plugin?
              P Spier CommunityMVP

              Right now it's not clear that the installer is installing a bad plugin rather than something corrupting it after install, so I'd reinstall and test.

               

              I'd also get back in touch with Recosoft customer service and ask them to provide a new download.

              • 4. Re: How to reinstall a corrupt, third-party plugin?
                si-boneGFX Community Member

                Been there, done that. I have tested as you suggest and the behavior repeats itself, consistently. I already wrote back to Recosoft but, so far, no answer. It may be that, in the end, I'll have to eat the expense as neither of the two parties involved, other than me, are prepared to give a straight, "this-is-how-you-do-it" solution. Nowadays software tends to be, in general, very stable but it does fail at times. It is surprising how Adobe (in Exchange) did not set up a way to deal with a full re-download and re-install situation (I could do that, yes, but I'd have to pay $99 for the plugin again). The Creative Cloud Desktop Manager allows me to do that; Exchange, on the other hand, only allows me to reinstall something that's already on my system, something that, as in this case, is no good to start with.

                • 5. Re: How to reinstall a corrupt, third-party plugin?
                  P Spier CommunityMVP

                  Get yourself escalated at both Recosoft and Adobe, and take names.

                  • 6. Re: How to reinstall a corrupt, third-party plugin?
                    si-boneGFX Community Member

                    Thanks, I will get more names. I do have some already:

                     

                    Himanshu in the Adobe Chat support. He abruptly went off line on me when he realized he could not (and did not want to) help me at all.

                    A few minutes after he went off line, I got an email from Adobe stating that "With this response, we believe your issue is resolved ..." What?


                    Anu Pant, Adobe Technical Support Associate. who wrote to me "The plugin is from Recosoft & not from Adobe, we have helped you with the installation & activation of the plugin but we cannot help you with the usage of the plugin." (?) In fact, he never helped me with the installation which is what I needed and still need. I did not ask for help with the usage, although he did insist on telling me that's what I needed. It was really like talking to a wall, a deaf wall.

                     

                    Thank you.

                    • 7. Re: How to reinstall a corrupt, third-party plugin?
                      Steve Werner CommunityMVP

                      General lesson to be learned. If you're having problems with an Add-on or plug-in, you need to work with the company that makes the Add-on or plug-in. You can't expect Adobe to support you for that.

                      • 8. Re: How to reinstall a corrupt, third-party plugin?
                        si-boneGFX Community Member

                        Thanks for the condescending advice. I did contact the vendor first. That's obvious, a no-brainer. Their (Recosoft's) reply was: "... contact the Adobe Exchange store to download it and install it again." Later they explained that because the plugin was acquired through Adobe Exchange and because they only sell that PDF2ID Lite version through Adobe Exchange, I had to ask you for assistance.

                         

                        In short, although they indeed build and provide the plugin, it is Adobe Exchange the engine that does the work to download, enable and/or disable a plugin. Exchange does nothing, however, to replace a bad plugin; there is no setting or button or whatever to re-download from source, replace a bad file and reinstall. The only options are enable and disable plugins OR purchase a plugin again. The latter is not a solution, really.

                         

                        What's interesting to me (other than this thing is still an exercise on pointing fingers) is that when a third party plugin to be used with an Adobe tool is added to your workflow it immediately acquires an Adobe-designed icon, a reflection of Adobe's brand. In general, one does not want to stamp a product with one's own brand unless one is ready to take some sort or responsibility for that product. Adobe appears not follow that logic though. You add one of your branded icons to a product that (it is obvious to me) you take zero responsibility for, one that I can't expect Adobe to support ...