6 Replies Latest reply on Jul 26, 2014 8:24 PM by Dave LaRonde

    Help with Slow Motion?

    Ziji Man Level 1

      After Effects CS6 (11.0.4) Windows 8

       

      I'm attempting to slow motion my entire clip at the same speed, beginning to end. Having difficulties.

       

      1) Time > Time Remapping

      I make keyframes, but if they are spread too far apart (to encompass the entire clip) it is ultra-slo motion. If you bring the keyframes closer together, it is only slow-motion for the portion of the clip that is between the keyframes.

       

      2) BCC Optical Flow (Boris FX10)

      I found the beautiful, slow motion that I wanted, but the clip remained as long as it started, which was 3:24...so it's only about halfway through the animation when it cuts off.

       

      Thanks for any suggestions or help.

        • 1. Re: Help with Slow Motion?
          Ziji Man Level 1

          Apparently slow motion questions get answered in slow motion as well. lol

           

          I've got 30 views and no comments...starting to feel like one of those shops at the mall that everybody looks at, but nobody goes in.

          • 2. Re: Help with Slow Motion?
            Richard M Knight Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            I use the time warp effect added to an adjustment layer, this seems to get round the problem of video length.

            • 3. Re: Help with Slow Motion?
              Ziji Man Level 1

              Thanks Richard! I thought slow-motion was the basic effect that everyone has used, but apparently not many people have experience with slow motion here.

               

              Appreciate your response!

              • 4. Re: Help with Slow Motion?
                Rick Gerard Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                Time remapping is very easy to use if you do the following.

                1. Make sure that your composition is long enough to include the slowed down clip - for slowing down the video this means your composition must be longer than the clip
                2. Enable time remapping
                3. The keyframes that are created represent the original time of the clip. There is one keyframe at the start and one at the end. If you want to end of the clip to be later then move it to the right and the clip will slow down
                4. Here is the important part - The out point of the layer, which is the end of the visible output does not change when you move the end keyframe to the right. You need to move the out point.

                Understand time is not easy for most folks. It can be hard to visualize what is actually happening. When you slow down video you are not changing the number of original frames, you are just spending more time looking at each frame. For example, if you have a video that is 100 frames long and you enable time remapping, extend your composition to 200 frames, set the out point of the video to frame 200 your video will play normally from frame 0 to frame 100 and then frame 100 will repeat until frame 200. If you move the last time remapping keyframe to frame 200 now frame 0 and frame 1 in the timeline will be frame 0 in the video. Each frame will play twice. Extend the composition to 1000 frames, adjust the out point to frame 1000 and move the last time remapping keyframe to frame 1000 and each frame will play 10 times. Frame 0 through 9 will be frame 1 of the original, frame 10 through 19 will be frame 2 of the original video. This means that the video will play slowly, but the action, the things moving in the frame will not appear smooth. You will not achieve smooth extreme slow motion.

                 

                There are 3rd party plug-ins that can do an amazing job of calculating the in-between frames in this scenario, and if properly set up do a good job of making a smooth transition between frame one and frame two of the original video. Frame blending will just create kind of a dissolve between the frames and it helps a great deal in some situations, but a plug-in like Twixtor will create a better job. AE's Time Warp plug-in also will do a good job with certain kinds of footage. The quality of the slow motion footage you can generate from footage shot at "Normal" frame rates (24 to 30 fps) depends entirely on the software used and what is going on in the frame. If you want to create very high quality slow motion footage then the original footage must be shot at a higher frame rate. 60 (or 59.97) fps is a good start but really good slow motion footage starts with a camera original shot at 90 or more fps. This requires a special camera with special capabilities.

                 

                I hope this helps. There is a lot of information on creating slow motion footage available by simply typing 'time remapping' or 'slow motion' in the After Effects Search Help field at the top right corner of the application frame. This is probably the most under utilized feature in After Effects. I've been using AE since it was invented and making a living teaching AE and producing product and I freely admit to doing a search in this field at least once a week to see if there is any new information on the features I want to use.

                 

                Adobe - Search: slow%20motion. There is a ton of information here. Read Up.

                • 5. Re: Help with Slow Motion?
                  Ziji Man Level 1

                  Thank you Rick! This is the Slow Motion Users Manual. I really appreciate this, it's completely clear to me now.

                  • 6. Re: Help with Slow Motion?
                    Dave LaRonde Level 6

                    Ziji Man wrote:

                     

                     

                    2) BCC Optical Flow (Boris FX10)

                    I found the beautiful, slow motion that I wanted, but the clip remained as long as it started, which was 3:24...so it's only about halfway through the animation when it cuts off.

                     

                    Thanks for any suggestions or help.

                     

                     

                    This is a no-brainer. If you make the audio half-speed, you need to make your comp twice as long.  Do it in the comp settings.  And you'll probably have to drag out the out-point of the clip, too.  I don't think that happens automatically.