4 Replies Latest reply on Jul 31, 2014 8:38 AM by trshaner

    hd vs full hd/Sd

    kg_himself

      I recently acquired a cannon rebel t3. I primarily intend to use it to record videos. I dont want to make featrue films I would just like to make web videos of fairly decent quality.

       

      However after reading the manual it seems my canon is only hd 720. not full hd.

       

      Will my videos still look decent? I am kinda bummed but I also am new to all this photo technology. Will my quality suffer?

       

      Thanks

        • 1. Re: hd vs full hd/Sd
          Conrad C Adobe Community Professional & MVP

          720p HD is only about one thing: the resolution. It's just one of a long list of factors that will determine the quality of your videos. If your videos are properly conceived, composed, lit, exposed, and focused, with good camera work, a great story, and proper editing and color grading in post, nobody's going to notice the resolution. Just think of all of the classic movies and TV shows made on lesser equipment like grainy old 16mm film. Having "only" 720p HD shouldn't stop you from learning and creating great work. 720p is still HD.

          • 2. Re: hd vs full hd/Sd
            trshaner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

            There will be some quality loss when playing T3 1280x720 videos on a 1920x1080 HDTV. But most HDTVs incorporate sophisticated upscalers to allow lower resolution video (i.e. DVDs) to fill the screen (i.e. Fit). They do a very a good job and I think you will be pleased with the quality. It will be better than DVD quality, but not quite Blu-ray level. When viewed on a computer or laptop screen at 1:1 view size the quality should be excellent. Your video files will also be much smaller than 1080p, which is a plus!

            • 3. Re: hd vs full hd/Sd
              Jao vdL Adobe Community Professional & MVP

              Well done 720p with good lenses and good technique is better than mediocre 1080p video. Most of this is going to depend on your technique. So I would not fret this too much. If you notice you are becoming limited by it, you should rent another body for a few days and see if it makes a real difference.

              Also do realize that most TVs are viewed from a distance where 720p is above average human visual acuity. Most people cannot tell the difference between 720p and 1080p on their HDTV setups because of this. That is not even considering that many TVs are setup badly out-of-the-box with black crushing contrast and white ruining brightness. Pretty standard is also that the TV applies way too much sharpening. The out-of-the-box settings on almost every HDTV that people buy will basically guarantee that even when peering at it from a few inches you won't see the difference as the TV ruins fine detail anyway with sharpening fringes. Some people with gigantic  (>50" at typical viewing distance) well-calibrated and tuned TVs might be able to pick out the 1080p footage if you switch between 720p and 1080p but the difference will generally be very subtle. For 4K you have to go to a 75" TV or so at 10' distance before a typical person can notice the difference. This is all even before you consider that these guidelines are only valid for static images. In moving images, humans are not able to see that much detail anyway.

              • 4. Re: hd vs full hd/Sd
                trshaner Adobe Community Professional & MVP

                Jao vdL wrote:

                Some people with gigantic  (>50" at typical viewing distance) well-calibrated and tuned TVs might be able to pick out the 1080p footage if you switch between 720p and 1080p but the difference will generally be very subtle.

                That would be me! I can see the difference between my local over-air HD network channels using an antenna versus over cable from my cable TV provider (Cablevision). The cable company apparently compresses the rebroadcast channel signal, which slightly reduces the resolution sharpness and strips the 5.1 sound to 2-channel stereo. In addition the HDTV standard in the US is 1080i, which is no better than 720p video your T3 produces:

                 

                http://www.cnet.com/how-to/1080i-and-1080p-are-the-same-resolution/

                 

                The only way currently to see 1080p video on your TV is with a blu-ray player or other 1080p streaming device, and an actual1080p video source (Blu-ray disc, Netflix)....or videos from a 1080p camera.